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Mark Paterson [23]Mark W. D. Paterson [2]
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Mark Paterson
University of Pittsburgh
  1. The Senses of Touch: Haptics, Affects and Technologies.Mark Paterson - 2007 - London, UK: Bloomsbury.
    Touch is the first sense to develop in the womb, yet often it is overlooked. The Senses of Touch examines the role of touching and feeling as part of the fabric of everyday, embodied experience. -/- How can we think about touch? Problems of touch and tactility run as a continuous thread in philosophy, psychology, medical writing and representations in art, from Ancient Greece to the present day. Picking through some of these threads, the book ‘feels’ its way towards writing (...)
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  2.  2
    Architecture of Sensation: Affect, Motility and the Oculomotor.Mark Paterson - 2017 - Body and Society 23 (1):3-35.
    Recent social theory that stresses the ‘nonrepresentational’, the ‘more-than visual’, and the relationship between affect and sensation have tended to assume some kind of break or rupture from historical antecedents. Especially since the contributions of Crary and Jay in the 1990s, when it comes to perceiving the built environment the complexities of sensation have been partially obscured by the dominance of a static model of vision as the principal organizing modality. This article returns to some prior historical articulations of the (...)
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  3.  27
    Movement for Movement's Sake? On the Relationship Between Kinaesthesia and Aesthetics.Mark Paterson - 2012 - Essays in Philosophy 13 (2):7.
    Movement and, more particularly, kinesthesia as a modality and as a metaphor has become of interest at the intersection of phenomenology and cognitive science. In this paper I wish to combine three historically related strands, aisthêsis, kinesthesis and aesthetics, to advance an argument concerning the aesthetic value of certain somatic sensations. Firstly, by capitalizing on a recent regard for somatic or inner bodily senses, including kinesthesia, proprioception and the vestibular system by drawing lines of historical continuity from earlier philosophical investigations (...)
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  4.  51
    Caresses, Excesses, Intimacies and Estrangements.Mark Paterson - 2004 - Angelaki 9 (1):165 – 177.
    The first part of the paper, “Foyer: feeling, look- ing, between-us” establishes the role of touch in intersubjectivity. Starting with Irigaray’s notion of the entre-nous, the “between-us,” I use touch as an example of deeply intersubjective communi- cation, an attempt to overcome estrangement. The ambiguity of touching, the physical action of touching and the affective reaction of feeling, is central to this. The second section, “Reception: receptivity, orderings of the sensible,” consolidates this experience of intersubjective touching within the confines of (...)
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  5.  37
    The Forgetting of Touch.Mark Paterson - 2005 - Angelaki 10 (3):115 – 132.
    We like Euclidean geometry because we are men [sic], and have eyes and hands, and need to operate a concept of space that will be independent of orientation, distance and size. Lucas, A Treatise on Time and Space.
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  6.  54
    The Senses and the History of Philosophy.Brian Glenney, José Filipe Silva, Jana Rosker, Susan Blake, Stephen H. Phillips, Katerina Ierodiakonou, Anna Marmodoro, Lukas Licka, Han Thomas Adriaenssen, Chris Meyns, Janet Levin, James Van Cleve, Deborah Boyle, Michael Madary, Josefa Toribio, Gabriele Ferretti, Clare Batty & Mark Paterson (eds.) - 2019 - New York, USA: Routledge.
    The study of perception and the role of the senses have recently risen to prominence in philosophy and are now a major area of study and research. However, the philosophical history of the senses remains a relatively neglected subject. Moving beyond the current philosophical canon, this outstanding collection offers a wide-ranging and diverse philosophical exploration of the senses, from the classical period to the present day. Written by a team of international contributors, it is divided into six parts: -/- Perception (...)
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  7. A Methodological Molyneux Question: Sensory Substitution, Plasticity and the Unification of Perceptual Theory.Mark Paterson & Mazviita Chirimuuta - 2014 - In Dustin Stokes, Mohan Matthen & Stephen Biggs (eds.), Perception and its Modalities. Oxford: pp. 410-430.
  8. Blindness, Empathy, and “Feeling Seeing”: Literary and Insider Accounts of Blind Experience.Mark Paterson - 2014 - Emotion, Space and Society 10 (1):95-104.
  9. Gaston Bachelard, The Dialectic of Duration. [REVIEW]Mark Paterson - 2001 - Philosophy in Review 21:159-162.
  10. Henri Bergson, Duration and Simultaneity: Bergson and the Einsteinian Universe Reviewed By.Mark Paterson - 2001 - Philosophy in Review 21 (3):159-162.
     
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  11.  2
    How We Became Sensorimotor: Movement, Measurement, Sensation.Mark Paterson - 2021 - Minneapolis, MN, USA: University of Minnesota Press.
    The years between 1833 and 1945 fundamentally transformed science’s understanding of the body’s inner senses, revolutionizing fields like philosophy, the social sciences, and cognitive science. In How We Became Sensorimotor, Mark Paterson provides a systematic account of this transformative period, while also demonstrating its substantial implications for current explorations into phenomenology, embodied consciousness, the extended mind, and theories of the sensorimotor, the body, and embodiment. -/- Each chapter of How We Became Sensorimotor takes a particular sense and historicizes its formation (...)
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  12. 'Looking on Darkness, Which the Blind Do See': Blindness, Empathy and Feeling Seeing.Mark Paterson - 2013 - Mosaic: A Journal for the Interdisciplinary Study of Literature 46 (3):163-181.
  13.  2
    Merleau-Ponty.Mark Paterson - 2004 - The Philosophers' Magazine 27:52-52.
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  14. Merleau-Ponty.Mark Paterson - 2004 - In Julian Baggini & Jeremy Stangroom (eds.), The Great Thinkers A-Z. London: pp. 158-160.
     
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  15.  80
    The Human Touch.Mark Paterson - 2009 - The Philosophers' Magazine 45 (45):50-56.
    Touch is a sense of communication. It is receptive, expressive, can communicate empathy. It can bring distant objects and people into proximity. It is a carnal world, with its pleasures of feeling and being felt, of tasting and touching the textures of flesh and of food. And equally it is a profound world of philosophical verification, of the communication of presence and empathy with others, of the mutual implication or folding of body, flesh and world.
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  16.  28
    Merleau-Ponty.Mark Paterson - 2004 - The Philosophers' Magazine 27:52-52.
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  17. Molyneux, Neuroplasticity, and Technologies of Sensory Substitution.Mark Paterson - 2019 - In Brian Glenney & J. F. Silva (eds.), The Senses and the History of Philosophy. New York: pp. 340-352.
  18. Molyneux Problem.Mark Paterson - 2020 - In D. Jalobeanu & Charles T. Wolfe (eds.), Encyclopedia of Early Modern Philosophy and Sciences. New York:
  19. Motricité, Physiology, and Modernity in Phenomenology of Perception.Mark Paterson - 2018 - In A. Mildenberg (ed.), Understanding Merleau-Ponty, Understanding Modernism. London: pp. 170--184.
  20.  1
    On Pain as a Distinct Sensation: Mapping Intensities, Affects, and Difference in ‘Interior States’.Mark Paterson - 2019 - Body and Society 25 (3):100-135.
    A recent widely reported study found that some participants would prefer to self-administer a small electric shock than be bored. This flawed study serves as a departure point to diagram pain and sensation beyond the boundaries of the individual body, consisting of four sections. First, in terms of laboratory-based experimentation and auto-experimentation with pain, there is a long history of viewing pain and touch through introspective means. Second, later theories of pain successively widened the scope of the physiological mechanisms and (...)
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  21.  63
    Skin: On the Cultural Border Between Self and the World.Mark W. D. Paterson - 2004 - British Journal of Aesthetics 44 (2):208-210.
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  22.  72
    Seeing with the Hands: Blindness, Vision and Touch After Descartes.Mark Paterson - 2016 - Edinburgh, UK: Edinburgh University Press.
    The ‘man born blind restored to light’ was one of the foundational myths of the Enlightenment, according to Foucault. With ophthalmic surgery in its infancy, the fascination by the sighted with blindness and what the blind might ‘see’ after sight restoration remained largely speculative. Was being blind, as Descartes once remarked, like ‘seeing with the hands’? Did evidence from early cataract operations begin to resolve epistemological debates about the relationship between vision and touch in the newly sighted, such as the (...)
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  23.  4
    The Biopolitics of Sensation, Techniques of Quantification, and the Production of a ‘New’ Sensorium.Mark Paterson - 2018 - Resilience: A Journal of the Environmental Humanities 5 (3):67-95.
  24.  10
    The Human Touch.Mark Paterson - 2009 - The Philosophers' Magazine 45:50-56.
    Touch is a sense of communication. It is receptive, expressive, can communicate empathy. It can bring distant objects and people into proximity. It is a carnal world, with its pleasures of feeling and being felt, of tasting and touching the textures of flesh and of food. And equally it is a profound world of philosophical verification, of the communication of presence and empathy with others, of the mutual implication or folding of body, flesh and world.
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  25.  10
    The Senses of Modernism: Technology, Perception and Aesthetics.Mark W. D. Paterson - 2003 - British Journal of Aesthetics 43 (4):424-427.
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