Results for 'Mark E. Stickel'

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  1.  27
    Interpretation as abduction.Jerry R. Hobbs, Mark E. Stickel, Douglas E. Appelt & Paul Martin - 1993 - Artificial Intelligence 63 (1-2):69-142.
  2.  17
    Nietzsche on Inequality, Education, and Human Flourishing.Mark E. Jonas - 2018 - In Ann Chinnery, Nuraan Davids, Naomi Hodgson, Kai Horsthemke, Viktor Johansson, Dirk Willem Postma, Claudia W. Ruitenberg, Paul Smeyers, Christiane Thompson, Joris Vlieghe, Hanan Alexander, Joop Berding, Charles Bingham, Michael Bonnett, David Bridges, Malte Brinkmann, Brian A. Brown, Carsten Bünger, Nicholas C. Burbules, Rita Casale, M. Victoria Costa, Brian Coyne, Renato Huarte Cuéllar, Stefaan E. Cuypers, Johan Dahlbeck, Suzanne de Castell, Doret de Ruyter, Samantha Deane, Sarah J. DesRoches, Eduardo Duarte, Denise Egéa, Penny Enslin, Oren Ergas, Lynn Fendler, Sheron Fraser-Burgess, Norm Friesen, Amanda Fulford, Heather Greenhalgh-Spencer, Stefan Herbrechter, Chris Higgins, Pádraig Hogan, Katariina Holma, Liz Jackson, Ronald B. Jacobson, Jennifer Jenson, Kerstin Jergus, Clarence W. Joldersma, Mark E. Jonas, Zdenko Kodelja, Wendy Kohli, Anna Kouppanou, Heikki A. Kovalainen, Lesley Le Grange, David Lewin, Tyson E. Lewis, Gerard Lum, Niclas Månsson, Christopher Martin & Jan Masschelein (eds.), International Handbook of Philosophy of Education. Springer Verlag. pp. 295-304.
    As recent policy debates demonstrate, schools in democratic societies are often under political and cultural pressure to equalize achievement among all students, even if it necessitates diverting resources from the most educationally advantaged to the least educationally advantaged. The assumption is that maximizing student potential is a zero-sum game, and the best way to increase achievement in the least advantaged group is to focus the majority of attention on their needs, even if it diminishes the potential of the most advantaged (...)
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  3.  30
    Vector Reliability: A new Approach to Epistemic Justification.Mark E. Wunderlich - 2003 - Synthese 136 (2):237-262.
    Critics of reliability theories of epistemic justificationoften claim that the `generality problem' is an insurmountabledifficulty for such theories. The generality problem is theproblem of specifying the level of generality at which abelief-forming process is to be described for the purposeof assessing its reliability. This problem is not asintractable as it seems. There are illuminating solutionsto analogous problems in the ethics literature. Reliabilistsought to attend to utilitarian approaches to choices betweeninfinite utility streams; they also ought to attend towelfarist approaches to social (...)
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  4. Vector reliability: A new approach to epistemic justification.Mark E. Wunderlich - 2003 - Synthese 136 (2):237 - 262.
    Critics of reliability theories of epistemic justificationoften claim that the `generality problem' is an insurmountabledifficulty for such theories. The generality problem is theproblem of specifying the level of generality at which abelief-forming process is to be described for the purposeof assessing its reliability. This problem is not asintractable as it seems. There are illuminating solutionsto analogous problems in the ethics literature. Reliabilistsought to attend to utilitarian approaches to choices betweeninfinite utility streams; they also ought to attend towelfarist approaches to social (...)
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  5. Democracy and Association.Mark E. Warren, Nina Eliasoph, Amy Gutmann & John Ehrenberg - 2002 - Political Theory 30 (2):289-298.
  6. Designing Deliberative Democracy: The British Columbia Citizens' Assembly.Mark E. Warren & Hilary Pearse (eds.) - 2008 - Cambridge University Press.
    Is it possible to advance democracy by empowering ordinary citizens to make key decisions about the design of political institutions and policies? In 2004, the government of British Columbia embarked on a bold democratic experiment: it created an assembly of 160 near-randomly selected citizens to assess and redesign the province's electoral system. The British Columbia Citizens' Assembly represents the first time a citizen body has had the power to reform fundamental political institutions. It was an innovative gamble that has been (...)
     
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  7.  31
    A modern learning theory perspective on the etiology of panic disorder.Mark E. Bouton, Susan Mineka & David H. Barlow - 2001 - Psychological Review 108 (1):4-32.
  8. When Teachers Must Let Education Hurt: Rousseau and Nietzsche on Compassion and the Educational Value of Suffering.Mark E. Jonas - 2010 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 44 (1):45-60.
    Avi Mintz (2008) has recently argued that Anglo-American educators have a tendency to alleviate student suffering in the classroom. According to Mintz, this tendency can be detrimental because certain kinds of suffering actually enhance student learning. While Mintz compellingly describes the effects of educator’s desires to alleviate suffering in students, he does not examine one of the roots of the desire: the feeling of compassion or pity (used as synonyms here). Compassion leads many teachers to unreflectively alleviate student struggles. While (...)
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  9.  47
    Education for Epiphany: The Case of Plato's Lysis.Mark E. Jonas - 2015 - Educational Theory 65 (1):39-51.
    While a great deal has been written on Plato's Lysis in philosophy and philology journals over the last thirty years, nothing has been published on Lysis in the major Anglo-American philosophy of education journals during that time. Nevertheless, this dialogue deserves attention from educators. In this essay, Mark Jonas argues that Lysis can serve as a model for educators who want to move their students beyond mere aporia, but also do not want to dictate answers to students. Although the (...)
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  10.  37
    Infinitary intuitionistic logic from a classical point of view.Mark E. Nadel - 1978 - Annals of Mathematical Logic 14 (2):159-191.
  11.  39
    Two Issues in Computer Ethics for Non-Programmers.Mark E. Wunderlich - 2010 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (2):255-264.
    Two of the distinctive ethical issues that arise for computer users (as opposed to computer programmers) have to do with the file formats that are used to encode information and the licensing terms for computer software. With respect to both issues, most professional philosophers do not recognize the burdens that they impose on others. Once one recognizes these burdens, a very simple argument demands changes in the behavior of the typical computer user: some of the ways we use computers gratuitously (...)
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  12.  57
    Indirect utility, justice, and equality in the political thought of David Hume.Mark E. Yellin - 2000 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 14 (4):375-389.
    Abstract Differing interpretations of the political thought of David Hume have tended to emphasize either conservative, gradualist elements similar to Burke or rationalist aspects similar to Hobbes. The concept of indirect utility as used by Hume reconciles these two approaches. Indirect utility is best illustrated by Hume's conception of justice, in contrast to his conception of benevolence, which yields direct benefits. This understanding of Hume's consequentialism also helps underscore certain egalitarian aspects of Hume's thought.
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  13. How to study adaptation (and why to do it that way).Mark E. Olson & Alfonso Arroyo-Santos - 2015 - Quarterly Review of Biology 90 (2):167-191.
    Some adaptationist explanations are regarded as maximally solid and others fanciful just-so stories. Just-so stories are explanations based on very little evidence. Lack of evidence leads to circular-sounding reasoning: “this trait was shaped by selection in unseen ancestral populations and this selection must have occurred because the trait is present.” Well-supported adaptationist explanations include evidence that is not only abundant but selected from comparative, populational, and optimality perspectives, the three adaptationist subdisciplines. Each subdiscipline obtains its broad relevance in evolutionary biology (...)
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  14.  96
    What Can Democratic Participation Mean Today?Mark E. Warren - 2002 - Philosophy Today 30 (5):677-701.
  15. Persons, Person Stages, Adaptive Preferences, and Historical Wrongs.Mark E. Greene - 2023 - Journal of Cognition and Neuroethics 9 (2):35-49.
    Let’s say that an act requires Person-Affecting Justification if and only if some alternative would have been better for someone. So, Lucifer breaking Xavier’s back requires Person-Affecting Justification because the alternative would have been better for Xavier. But the story continues: While Lucifer evades justice, Xavier moves on and founds a school for gifted children. Xavier’s deepest values become identified with the school and its community. When authorities catch Lucifer, he claims no Person-Affecting Justification is needed: because the attack set (...)
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  16.  49
    What should and should not be said: Deliberating sensitive issues.Mark E. Warren - 2005 - Journal of Social Philosophy 37 (2):163–181.
  17. A (R)evaluation of Nietzsche’s Anti-democratic Pedagogy: The Overman, Perspectivism, and Self-overcoming.Mark E. Jonas - 2008 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 28 (2):153-169.
    In this paper, I argue that Friedrich Nietzsche’s concept of self-overcoming has been largely misinterpreted in the philosophy of education journals. The misinterpretation partially stems from a misconstruction of Nietzsche’s perspectivism, and leads to a conception of self-overcoming that is inconsistent with Nietzsche’s educational ideals. To show this, I examine some of the prominent features of the so-called “debate” of the 1980s surrounding Nietzsche’s conception of self-overcoming. I then offer an alternative conception that is more consistent with Nietzsche’s thought, and (...)
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  18. Finding truth in 'lies': Nietzsche's perspectivism and its relation to education.Mark E. Jonas & Yoshiaki M. Nakazawa - 2008 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 42 (2):269-285.
    In his 2001 article 'Teaching to Lie and Obey: Nietzsche on Education', Stefan Ramaekers defends Nietzsche's concept of perspectivism against the charge that it is relativistic. He argues that perspectivism is not relativistic because it denies the dichotomy between the 'true' world and the 'seeming' world, a dichotomy central to claims to relativism. While Ramaekers' article is correct in denying relativistic interpretations of perspectivism it does not go far enough in this direction. In fact, the way Ramaekers makes his case (...)
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  19.  38
    Finding Truth in ‘Lies’: Nietzsche’s Perspectivism and its Relation to Education.Mark E. Jonas & Yoshiaki M. Nakazawa - 2008 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 42 (2):269-285.
    In his 2001 article ‘Teaching to Lie and Obey: Nietzsche on Education’, Stefan Ramaekers defends Nietzsche’s concept of perspectivism against the charge that it is relativistic. He argues that perspectivism is not relativistic because it denies the dichotomy between the ‘true’ world and the ‘seeming’ world, a dichotomy central to claims to relativism. While Ramaekers’ article is correct in denying relativistic interpretations of perspectivism it does not go far enough in this direction. In fact, the way Ramaekers makes his case (...)
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  20. Dewey's Conception of Interest and its Significance for Teacher Education.Mark E. Jonas - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (2):112-129.
    Many teachers in teacher education programs are cursorily introduced to Dewey's ‘epochmaking’ ideas on interest and effort through discussions based on the need for child-centered pedagogies that utilize students' interests. Unfortunately, this strategy often tacitly encourages teachers to over-rely on students' interests. In this paper, I recommend a way of introducing Dewey's conception of interest that avoids the common pitfall of over-reliance on students' interests. I argue that if we focus on the changes Dewey made to the expression of his (...)
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  21.  23
    Mendeleyev revisited.E. G. Marks & J. A. Marks - 2021 - Foundations of Chemistry 23 (2):215-223.
    Despite the periodic table having been discovered by chemists half a century before the discovery of electronic structure, modern designs are invariably based on physicists’ definition of periods. This table is a chemists’ table, reverting to the phenomenal periods that led to the table’s discovery. In doing so, the position of hydrogen is clarified.
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  22.  52
    Three Misunderstandings of Plato's Theory of Moral Education.Mark E. Jonas - 2016 - Educational Theory 66 (3):301-322.
    In this essay, Mark Jonas argues that there are three broadly held misconceptions of Plato's philosophy that work against his relevance for contemporary moral education. The first is that he is an intellectualist who is concerned only with the cognitive aspect of moral development and does not sufficiently emphasize the affective and conative aspects; the second is that he is an elitist who believes that only philosopher-kings can attain true knowledge of virtue and it is they who should govern (...)
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  23.  30
    Plato's Anti‐Kohlbergian Program for Moral Education.Mark E. Jonas - 2016 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 50 (2):205-217.
    Following Lawrence Kohlberg it has been commonplace to regard Plato's moral theory as ‘intellectualist’, where Plato supposedly believes that becoming virtuous requires nothing other than ‘philosophical knowledge or intuition of the ideal form of the good’. This is a radical misunderstanding of Plato's educational programme, however. While Plato claims that knowledge is extremely important in the initial stages of the moral development of young adults, he also claims that knowledge must be followed by a rigorous process of imitation and habituation. (...)
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  24.  82
    Roberts on Depletion: How Much Better Can We Do for Future People?Mark E. Greene - 2016 - Utilitas 28 (1):108-118.
    Suppose that Depletion will reduce the well-being of future people. Many of us would like to say that Depletion is wrong because of the harm to future people. However, it can easily be made to seem that Depletion is actually harmless – this is the non-identity problem. I discuss a particularly ingenious attempt by Melinda Roberts to attribute a harm to Depletion. I will argue that the magnitude of Roberts's harm is off target by many orders of magnitude: it is (...)
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  25. Appetite, Reason, and Education in Socrates' 'City of Pigs'.Mark E. Jonas, Yoshiaki M. Nakazawa & James Braun - 2012 - Phronesis 57 (4):332-357.
    In Book II of the Republic, Socrates briefly depicts a city where each inhabitant contributes to the welfare of all by performing the role for which he or she is naturally suited. Socrates calls this city the `true city ' and the `healthy one'. Nearly all commentators have argued that Socrates' praise of the city cannot be taken at face value, claiming that it does not represent Socrates' preferred community. The point of this paper is to argue otherwise. The claim (...)
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  26.  96
    Thinking in continua: Beyond the adaptive radiation metaphor.Mark E. Olson & Alfonso Arroyo-Santos - 2009 - Bioessays 31 (12):1337-1346.
    ‘‘Adaptive radiation’’ is an evocative metaphor for explosive evolutionary divergence, which for over 100 years has given a powerful heuristic to countless scientists working on all types of organisms at all phylogenetic levels. However, success has come at the price of making ‘‘adaptive radiation’’ so vague that it can no longer reflect the detailed results yielded by powerful new phylogeny-based techniques that quantify continuous adaptive radiation variables such as speciation rate, phylogenetic tree shape, and morphological diversity. Attempts to shoehorn the (...)
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  27. Behavior systems and the contextual control of anxiety, fear, and panic.Mark E. Bouton - 2005 - In Lisa Feldman Barrett, Paula M. Niedenthal & Piotr Winkielman (eds.), Emotion and Consciousness. Guilford Press.
  28.  26
    Plato’s legacy: alive and well.Mark E. Jonas & Yoshiaki Nakazawa - 2023 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 57 (3):699-707.
    In this essay, we outline the central thesis of our recent book: A Platonic Theory of Moral Education: Cultivating Virtue in Contemporary Democratic Classrooms. We argue that the ethical, epistemological, political, and metaphysical doctrines typically attributed to Plato are not doctrines Plato holds, or at least are not doctrines that he holds in the way he is interpreted to have done. We claim that if we understand Plato’s relationship to these supposed doctrines better, we would discover that Plato’s views are (...)
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  29.  27
    Contract, Culture, and Citizenship: Transformative Liberalism From Hobbes to Rawls.Mark E. Button - 2008 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    "Explores the concept of the social contract and how it shapes citizenship. Argues that the modern social contract is an account of the ethical and cultural conditions upon which modern citizenship depends"--Provided by publisher.
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  30.  27
    Error Reduction, Patient Safety and Institutional Ethics Committees.Mark E. Meaney - 2004 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (2):358-364.
    Institutional ethics committees remain largely absent from the literature on error reduction and patient safety. This paper attempts to fill the gap. Healthcare professionals are on the front lines in the defense against medical error, but the changes that are needed to reduce medical errors and enhance patient safety are cultural and systemic in nature. As noted in the Hastings Centers recent report, Promoting Patient Safety, the occurrence of medical error involves a complex web of multiple factors. Human misstep is (...)
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  31.  25
    Error Reduction, Patient Safety and Institutional Ethics Committees.Mark E. Meaney - 2004 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (2):358-364.
    Institutional ethics committees remain largely absent from the literature on error reduction and patient safety. This paper attempts to fill the gap. Healthcare professionals are on the front lines in the defense against medical error, but the changes that are needed to reduce medical errors and enhance patient safety are cultural and systemic in nature. As noted in the Hastings Centers recent report, Promoting Patient Safety, the occurrence of medical error involves a complex web of multiple factors. Human misstep is (...)
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  32.  20
    What can participatory democracy mean today.Mark E. Warren - 2002 - Political Theory 30 (5):677-701.
  33. Missing the Mark: Sin and Its Consequences in Biblical Theology.Mark E. Biddle - 2005
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  34.  26
    The farmer, the hunter, and the census taker: three distinct views of animal behavior.Mark E. Borrello - 2010 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 32 (1).
  35.  23
    Trying Creation: Scientific Disputes and Legal Strategies.Mark E. Herlihy - 1982 - Science, Technology and Human Values 7 (3):63-66.
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  36.  6
    Frontier atmosphere: observation and regret at Chinese weather stations in Tibet, 1939–1949.Mark E. Frank - 2021 - British Journal for the History of Science 54 (3):361-379.
    Across Tibet during the 1940s, young Han Chinese weather observers became stranded at their weather stations, where they faced illness, poverty and isolation as they pleaded with their superiors for relief. Building on the premise that China exercised ‘imperial nationalism’ in Tibet, and in light of scholarship that emphasizes the desirous ‘gaze’ of imperial observers toward the frontier, this essay considers how the meteorological archive might disrupt our understanding of the relationship between observation and empire. Meteorology presented a new way (...)
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  37.  20
    Health Information Exchange in Memphis: Impact on the Physician-Patient Relationship.Mark E. Frisse - 2010 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (1):50-57.
    Health information exchanges represent one way of making medical information available to practitioners across institutional boundaries. One health information exchange in Memphis Tennessee has been operational since May of 2006 and provides information supporting care for over 1.2 million individuals. Creating such an exchange challenged traditional institutional boundaries, roles, and perceptions. Approaching these challenges required leadership, trust, sound policy, new forms of dialogue, and an incremental approach to technology. Early evidence suggests a positive impact on patient care and a change (...)
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  38.  21
    Health Information Exchange in Memphis: Impact on the Physician-Patient Relationship.Mark E. Frisse - 2010 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (1):50-57.
    Patients and their physicians frequently make important health care decisions with incomplete information. Memory fails; records are incomplete; the onset of significant events is confused with other life stories; and even the most basic information about medications, laboratory tests, allergies, and problems is often the result of guesswork. As providers and as patients, we suffer because information vital to health care is not available when and where it is needed. Data required for care are dispersed across various settings and represented (...)
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  39.  46
    Lonergan’s Method in Ethics and the Meaning of Human Sexuality.Mark E. Frisby - 1989 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 63:235-256.
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  40.  39
    Risking Belief: A Bayesian Decision Theoretic Epistemology.Mark E. Sargent - unknown
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  41.  26
    Conducting ethical research with correctional populations: Do researchers and IRB members know the federal regulations?Mark E. Johnson, Christiane Brems, Bridget L. Hanson, Staci L. Corey, Gloria D. Eldridge & Kristen Mitchell - 2014 - Research Ethics 10 (1):6-16.
    Conducting or overseeing research in correctional settings requires knowledge of specific federal rules and regulations designed to protect the rights of individuals in incarceration. To investigate the extent to which relevant groups possess this knowledge, using a 10-item questionnaire, we surveyed 885 IRB prisoner representatives, IRB members and chairs with and without experience reviewing HIV/AIDS correctional protocols, and researchers with and without correctional HIV/AIDS research experience. Across all groups, respondents answered 4.5 of the items correctly. Individuals who have overseen or (...)
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  42.  5
    An Arbitrary Equivalence Relation as Elementary Equivalence in an Abstract Logic.Mark E. Nadel - 1980 - Mathematical Logic Quarterly 26 (7‐9):103-109.
  43.  26
    An Arbitrary Equivalence Relation as Elementary Equivalence in an Abstract Logic.Mark E. Nadel - 1980 - Mathematical Logic Quarterly 26 (7-9):103-109.
  44.  17
    Scott heights of Abelian groups.Mark E. Nadel - 1994 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 59 (4):1351-1359.
  45.  8
    Taste discrimination learning in preweanling rats.Mark E. Stanton & Michelle M. Nicolle - 1990 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 28 (4):319-322.
  46. Max Weber's Nietzschean conception of power.Mark E. Warren - 1992 - History of the Human Sciences 5 (3):19-37.
  47.  39
    Wittgenstein on language-games of visual sensations and language-games of visual objects.Mark E. Weber - 1993 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 31 (4):491-518.
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  48.  8
    Wittgenstein on Language‐Games of Visual Sensations and Language‐Games of Visual Objects.Mark E. Weber - 1993 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 31 (4):491-518.
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  49.  19
    Foreplay.Mark E. Workman - 1991 - Substance 20 (1):3.
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  50.  24
    Radicals and revolution.Mark E. Borrello - 2004 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 35 (1):209-216.
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