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  1.  44
    Sowing the Seeds of Its Own Destruction: Democracy and Democide in the Weimar Republic and Beyond.Mark Chou - 2012 - Theoria: A Journal of Social and Political Theory 59 (133):21-49.
  2.  7
    Democracy Against Itself: Sustaining an Unsustainable Idea.Mark Chou - 2014 - Edinburgh University Press.
    Why do some democracies self-destruct? Using the collapse of democracy in ancient Athens and the Weimar Republic, as well as the uncertain fate of democratic rule in the United States and China today as illustrative examples, Mark Chou examines the conditions and characteristics of democracy that make it prone to self-destruct. In drawing out the political lessons from these past collapses, he explains how a democracy can, simply by being democratic, sow the seeds of its own destruction.
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  3.  78
    Democracy in an Age of Tragedy: Democracy, Tragedy and Paradox.Mark Chou - 2010 - Critical Horizons 11 (2):289-313.
    Democracy and tragedy captured a delicate poise in ancient Athens. While many today perceive democracy as a finite, unquestionable and almost procedural form of governance that glorifies equality and liberty for their own sake, the Athenians saw it as so much more. Beyond the burgeoning equality and liberty, which were but fronts for a deeper goal, finitude, unimpeachability and procedural norms were constantly contradicted by boundlessness, subversion and disarray. In such a world, where certainty and immortality were luxuries beyond the (...)
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  4.  16
    Democracy & Tragedy.Mark Chou - 2013 - Philosophy Now 94:9-11.
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  5.  9
    Greek tragedy and contemporary democracy.Mark Chou - 2012 - New York: Bloomsbury Academic.
    This title tells the story of democracy through the perspective of tragic drama. It shows how the ancient tales of greatness and its loss point to the potential dangers of democracy then and now.
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  6.  39
    Morgenthau, the Tragic: On Tragedy and the Transition from Scientific Man to Politics Among Nations.Mark Chou - 2011 - Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2011 (157):109-128.
    ExcerptIntroduction When Hans J. Morgenthau—one of the key architects of twentieth-century international relations1—first penned Scientific Man vs. Power Politics, it was his scorn of modern science, or “dogmatic scientism,” that spoke the loudest. But with the publication of Politics Among Nations only several years later, this scorn had seemingly vanished. Focused on an altogether different enterprise, Morgenthau now set about to “present a theory of international politics.”2 What captivated him most in this endeavor was reality—something that he contended was dictated (...)
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