18 found
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  1.  29
    Three Modes of Evolution by Natural Selection and Drift: A New or an Extended Evolutionary Synthesis?Marion Blute - 2017 - Biological Theory 12 (2):67-71.
    According to sources both in print and at a recent meeting, evolutionary theory is currently undergoing change which some would characterize as a New Synthesis, and others as an Extended Synthesis. This article argues that the important changes involve recognizing that there are three means by which evolutionary change can be initiated and three corresponding modes of evolutionary drift. It compares the three and goes on to discuss the scale of innovation and extended or inclusive and Lamarckian inheritance. It concludes (...)
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  2.  55
    Is It Time for an Updated ‘Eco-Evo-Devo’ Definition of Evolution by Natural Selection?Marion Blute - 2008 - Spontaneous Generations 2 (1):1.
    Abstract A lot of science has passed under the bridge since the classic definition of evolution as a change in gene frequencies in a population became common. Much knowledge has accumulated since then about evolution, heredity, ecology, development, phenotypic plasticity, niche construction and genetic drift. Building on Van Valen’s description of evolution as “the control of development by ecology,” it is suggested that the classic definition be replaced by a updated ‘eco‐evo-evo’ definition of evolution by natural selection which acknowledges this (...)
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  3.  20
    The Evolution of Replication.Marion Blute - 2007 - Biological Theory 2 (1):10-22.
    If all origins of life or of any new grade, level, or major transition as such begin with “competitive development”—with juveniles rather than adults, and multiple individuals rather than a single one—then the evolution of progeneration and of replication always requires an explanation. This article proposes that principles of evolutionary ecology such as density-dependence can be used to explain three kinds of developmental repetitions, viz., sequences of inductive and niche-constructing interactions between the ecological environment and population members, which take place (...)
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  4.  48
    The Reinvention of Grand Theories of the Scientific/Scholarly Process.Marion Blute & Paul Armstrong - 2011 - Perspectives on Science 19 (4):391-425.
    This research was inspired by Werner Callebaut's (1993) classic in which he interviewed major contemporary philosophers of science (specifically of biology) at a time when the interdisciplinary label of "science studies" had hardly been invented. The "real" in his title, Taking the Naturalistic Turn: How Real Philosophy of Science is Done, was a playful reference to debates over realism in Philosophy—the title as a whole drawing attention to his intent to study science studies empirically. That, for Callebaut, was "real" philosophy.In (...)
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  5.  37
    Origins and the EcoEvoDevo Problem.Marion Blute - 2006 - Biological Theory 1 (2):116-118.
  6.  31
    The Evolution of Anisogamy: More Questions Than Answers.Marion Blute - 2013 - Biological Theory 7 (1):3-9.
    Despite a revived interest in explaining the evolution of anisogamy in recent years (i.e. different—micro and macrogametes), there remain more questions than answers. The topic is important because it is thought to be the foundation of the theory of gender differences and relations. Twelve of these questions are briefly reviewed here—(1) the distinction between sex and sexual types; (2) the distinction between mating types and anisogamy; (3) the possible role of ecological as well as social evolution in proto-gender differences and (...)
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  7.  37
    Biologists on Sociocultural Evolution: A Critical Analysis.Marion Blute - 1987 - Sociological Theory 5 (2):185-193.
    Four theoretical monographs, written by biologists in the wake of the sociobiology debate, and which treat, or purport to treat, the topic of sociocultural evolution are examined in this paper. On the biosocial spectrum they range from Trivers' pure sociobiology, to Lumsden and Wilson's sociobiology "in drag," to Boyd and Richerson's genuinely dual approach, to Cavalli-Sforza and Feldman's purely cultural transmission and evolution. The latter is likely to prove of greatest interest to social scientists and represents a major advance in (...)
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  8.  25
    Mating Markets: A Naturally Selected Sex Allocation Theory of Sexual Selection.Marion Blute - 2019 - Biological Theory 14 (2):103-111.
    This article utilizes three premises. There are commonly ecologically oriented, naturally selected specialized differences in frequency and/or quality as well as sexually selected differences between the sexes. Sex in the sense of coming together and going apart or going apart and coming together is trade in these naturally selected differences, i.e., there is a mating market in sexual species. While such trade is beneficial to the population as a whole, sexual competition and selection is conflict over the profits of that (...)
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  9.  19
    A New, New Definition of Evolution by Natural Selection.Marion Blute - 2019 - Biological Theory 14 (4):280-281.
    This note provides a definition of evolution by natural selection that is compatible with the extended evolutionary synthesis.
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  10.  38
    Hamilton: Heir of Darwin and Fisher?Marion Blute - 2014 - Biological Theory 9 (2):229-231.
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  11.  28
    The Evolutionary Economics of Science.Marion Blute - 2013 - Spontaneous Generations 7 (1):62-68.
    This short paper is about the generalized evolutionary approach to the economics of science. Stephen Toulmin and David Hull are pioneers of the former rather than Karl Popper whose falsification thesis was sociologically naive. Useful directions for the future would go beyond the generalities of variation, transmission and selection towards making more explicit use of Darwin’s “two great principles.” The first is “the unity of types” i.e. common descent by employing phylogenetic methods to answer historical questions. The second is “the (...)
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  12.  23
    Condition-Dependent Adaptive Phenotypic Plasticity and Interspecific Gene-Culture Coevolution.Marion Blute - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (2):81-81.
    Evolutionary socioecological theory and research proposing linking parasites with human social organization is uncommon and therefore welcome. However, more generally, condition-dependent adaptive phenotypic plasticity requires environmental uncertainty on a small scale, accompanied by reliable cues. In addition, genes in parasites may select among biologically adaptive cultural alternatives directly without necessarily going through human genetic predispositions, resulting in inter-specific gene-culture coevolution.
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  13.  9
    Life History Theory and the Industrial Revolution.Marion Blute - 2019 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 42.
    The most general theory of life history evolution, that of r versus K selection, implies that innovation in the form of plasticity is more likely to be adaptive under poor rather than good resource conditions, the opposite of how Baumard has it. However, this does focus on benefits rather than costs, and including both allows for greater diversity of outcomes.
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  14.  10
    Evolution’s First Law?: Biology’s First Law: The Tendency for Diversity and Complexity to Increase in Evolutionary Systems Daniel W. McShea and Robert N. Brandon Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2010.Marion Blute - 2010 - Biological Theory 5 (2):194-197.
  15.  10
    Evolution’s First Law?: Biology’s First Law: The Tendency for Diversity and Complexity to Increase in Evolutionary Systems Daniel W. McShea and Robert N. Brandon Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2010. [REVIEW]Marion Blute - 2010 - Biological Theory 5 (2):194-197.
  16.  14
    Social Learning by Observation is Analogue, Instruction is Digital.Marion Blute - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (2):327-327.
    Social learning in the strict sense is learning by observation or instruction. Learning by observation appears to be an analogue process while learning by instruction is digital. In evolutionary biology this distinction is currently thought to have implications for the extent to which mechanisms can function successfully as an inheritance system in an evolutionary process.
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  17.  47
    A Single-Process Learning Theory.Marion Blute - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (3):529-531.
    Many analogies exist between the process of evolution by natural selection and of learning by reinforcement and punishment. A full extension of the evolutionary analogy to learning to include analogues of the fitness, genotype, development, environmental influences, and phenotype concepts makes possible a single theory of the learning process able to encompass all of the elementary procedures known to yield learning.
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  18.  10
    Reflections on Trees of Knowledge.Marion Blute - 2009 - Spontaneous Generations 3 (1):223-225.
    On September 30th I attended a talk by Ian Hacking, the renowned philosopher of science. The topic, “The Tree of Knowledge,” was irresistible for someone like myself whose main interest is in sociocultural evolution. I was rewarded with a dazzling display of erudition about stylized trees drawn through history and across civilizations. Hacking generously credited the many experts he had consulted to amass this treasure. This was consistent with his preference for “collaborating disciplines” over interdisciplinarity.
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