4 found
Order:
  1.  68
    Intuitive Dualism and Afterlife Beliefs: A Cross‐Cultural Study.H. Clark Barrett, Alexander Bolyanatz, Tanya Broesch, Emma Cohen, Peggy Froerer, Martin Kanovsky, Mariah G. Schug & Stephen Laurence - 2021 - Cognitive Science 45 (6):e12992.
    It is widely held that intuitive dualism—an implicit default mode of thought that takes minds to be separable from bodies and capable of independent existence—is a human universal. Among the findings taken to support universal intuitive dualism is a pattern of evidence in which “psychological” traits (knowledge, desires) are judged more likely to continue after death than bodily or “biological” traits (perceptual, physiological, and bodily states). Here, we present cross-cultural evidence from six study populations, including non-Western societies with diverse belief (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  2.  12
    Geographical Cues and Developmental Exposure.Mariah G. Schug - 2016 - Human Nature 27 (1):68-81.
    The current study assessed potential relationships among childhood wayfinding experience, navigational style, and adult wayfinding anxiety in the Faroe Islands. The Faroe Islands are of interest because they have an unusual geography that may promote the use of an orientational style of navigation (e.g., use of cardinal directions). Faroese adults completed questionnaires assessing (1) their permitted childhood range sizes, (2) the types of navigational strategies they use, and (3) the amount of anxiety they experience when navigating in adulthood. Males had (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  3.  16
    Childhood Experience Reduces Gender Differences in Spatial Abilities: A Cross‐Cultural Study.Mariah G. Schug, Erica Barhorst-Cates, Jeanine Stefanucci, Sarah Creem-Regehr, Anna P. L. Olsen & Elizabeth Cashdan - 2022 - Cognitive Science 46 (2):e13096.
    Spatial experience in childhood is a factor in the development of spatial abilities. In this study, we assessed whether American and Faroese participants’ (N = 246, Mage = 19.31 years, 151 females) early spatial experience and adult spatial outcomes differed by gender and culture, and if early experience was related to adult performance and behavior. Participants completed retrospective reports on their childhood spatial experience, both large-scale (permitted childhood range size) and small-scale (Lego play). They also completed assessments of their current (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  13
    Childhood Experience Reduces Gender Differences in Spatial Abilities: A Cross‐Cultural Study.Mariah G. Schug, Erica Barhorst-Cates, Jeanine Stefanucci, Sarah Creem-Regehr, Anna P. L. Olsen & Elizabeth Cashdan - 2022 - Cognitive Science 46 (2):e13096.
    Cognitive Science, Volume 46, Issue 2, February 2022.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark