50 found
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  1. The Benefit to Philosophy of the Study of its History.Maria Rosa Antognazza - 2015 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 23 (1):161-184.
    This paper advances the view that the history of philosophy is both a kind of history and a kind of philosophy. Through a discussion of some examples from epistemology, metaphysics, and the historiography of philosophy, it explores the benefit to philosophy of a deep and broad engagement with its history. It comes to the conclusion that doing history of philosophy is a way to think outside the box of the current philosophical orthodoxies. Somewhat paradoxically, far from imprisoning its students in (...)
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  2. XII—The Distinction in Kind between Knowledge and Belief.Maria Rosa Antognazza - 2021 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 120 (3):277-308.
    Drawing inspiration from a well-attested historical tradition, I propose an account of cognition according to which knowledge is not only prior to belief; it is also, and crucially, not a kind of belief. Believing, in turn, is not some sort of botched knowing, but a mental state fundamentally different from knowing, with its own distinctive and complementary role in our cognitive life. I conclude that the main battle-line in the history of epistemology is drawn between the affirmation of a natural (...)
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  3.  66
    Leibniz: An Intellectual Biography.Maria Rosa Antognazza - 2008 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    Of all the thinkers of the century of genius that inaugurated modern philosophy, none lived an intellectual life more rich and varied than Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz. Maria Rosa Antognazza's pioneering biography provides a unified portrait of this unique thinker and the world from which he came. At the centre of the huge range of Leibniz's apparently miscellaneous endeavours, Antognazza reveals a single master project lending unity to his extraordinarily multifaceted life's work. Throughout the vicissitudes of his long life, Leibniz tenaciously (...)
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  4. The Hypercategorematic Infinite.Maria Rosa Antognazza - 2015 - The Leibniz Review 25:5-30.
    This paper aims to show that a proper understanding of what Leibniz meant by “hypercategorematic infinite” sheds light on some fundamental aspects of his conceptions of God and of the relationship between God and created simple substances or monads. After revisiting Leibniz’s distinction between (i) syncategorematic infinite, (ii) categorematic infinite, and (iii) actual infinite, I examine his claim that the hypercategorematic infinite is “God himself” in conjunction with other key statements about God. I then discuss the issue of whether the (...)
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  5.  47
    Leibniz on the Trinity and the Incarnation: Reason and Revelation in the Seventeenth Century.Maria Rosa Antognazza - 2007 - Yale University Press.
    Throughout his long intellectual life, Leibniz penned his reflections on Christian theology, yet this wealth of material has never been systematically gathered or studied. This book addresses an important and central aspect of these neglected materials—Leibniz’s writings on two mysteries central to Christian thought, the Trinity and the Incarnation. -/- From Antognazza’s study emerges a portrait of a thinker surprisingly receptive to traditional Christian theology and profoundly committed to defending the legitimacy of truths beyond the full grasp of human reason. (...)
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  6.  57
    Intuition in the history of philosophy (what’s in it for philosophers today?).Maria Rosa Antognazza & Marco Segala - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 31 (4):574-578.
    What are intuitions? Do they exist as distinctive mental states? Do they have an epistemic function? Can we discern specific features that characterize intuitions? Questions like these are widely d...
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  7. Primary matter, primitive passive power, and creaturely limitation in Leibniz.Maria Rosa Antognazza - 2014 - Studia Leibnitiana 46 (2):167-186.
    In this paper I argue that, in Leibniz’s mature metaphysics, primary matter is not a positive constituent which must be added to the form in order to have a substance. Primary matter is merely a way to express the negation of some further perfection. It does not have a positive ontological status and merely indicates the limitation or imperfection of a substance. To be sure, Leibniz is less than explicit on this point, and in many texts he writes as if (...)
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  8. Ecclesiology, Ecumenism, Toleration.Maria Rosa Antognazza - 2013 - In The Oxford Handbook of Leibniz. New York: Oxford University Press.
    This contribution discusses Leibniz’s conception of the Christian church, his life-long ecumenical efforts, and his stance toward religious toleration. Leibniz’s regarded the main Christian denominations as particular churches constituting the only one truly catholic or universal church, whose authority went back to apostolic times, and whose theology was to be traced back to the entire ecclesiastical tradition. This is the ecclesiology which underpins his ecumenism. The main phases and features of his work toward reunification of Protestants and Roman Catholics, and (...)
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  9.  27
    Leibniz’s opposition to monism.Maria Rosa Antognazza - 2024 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 32 (3):666-686.
    Leibniz's metaphysics appears to go a long way towards monism: it supports a strong dependence of limited things on the absolute or God and understands this dependence not only as causal dependence but also as a pervasive ontological dependence which involves the communality of nature between absolute and limited. Yet, Leibniz stops short of affirming monism. Why? This paper takes a fresh look at Leibniz's reasons for opposing monism through the lens of a virtually unknown text of 1698 on the (...)
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  10. Knowledge and Belief from Plato to Locke.Michael Ayers & Maria Rosa Antognazza - 2019 - In Michael Ayers & Maria Rosa Antognazza (eds.), Knowing and Seeing. Oxford, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press. pp. 3–33.
    This essential historical introduction to the main themes of the book starts with a close, sympathetic, and significantly novel analysis of a famous argument in Plato’s Republic in which Plato draws a distinction of kind between knowledge and belief, and between their objects. It is then demonstrated that the distinction, broadly so understood, remained a dominant force, in one form or another, in all non-sceptical branches of the European philosophical tradition, including empiricism, until the eighteenth century. It is argued that (...)
     
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  11.  16
    Leibniz: A Very Short Introduction.Maria Rosa Antognazza - 2016 - Oxford, England: Oxford University Press UK.
    Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz was a man of extraordinary intellectual creativity who lived an exceptionally rich and varied intellectual life in troubled times. More than anything else, he was a man who wanted to improve the life of his fellow human beings through the advancement of all the sciences and the establishment of a stable and just political order. In this Very Short Introduction Maria Rosa Antognazza outlines the central features of Leibniz's philosophy in the context of his overarching intellectual vision (...)
  12.  37
    Leibniz and Religious Toleration.Maria Rosa Antognazza - 2002 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 76 (4):601-622.
    As one might expect, throughout his life Leibniz assumed an attitude of religious toleration both ad intra (that is, toward Christians of other confessions) and ad extra (that is, toward non-Christians, notably Muslims). The aim of this paper is to uncover the philosophical and theological foundations of Leibniz’s views on this subject. Focusing in particular on his epistolary exchange with the French Catholic convert Paul Pellisson-Fontanier, I argue that neither toleration ad intra nor toleration ad extra is grounded for Leibniz (...)
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  13. Philosophy and Science in Leibniz.Maria Rosa Antognazza - 2017 - In Lloyd Strickland, Erik Vynckier & Julia Weckend (eds.), Tercentenary Essays on the Philosophy & Science of G.W. Leibniz. Cham: Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 19-46.
    This paper explores the question of Leibniz’s contribution to the rise of modern ‘science’. To be sure, it is now generally agreed that the modern category of ‘science’ did not exist in the early modern period. At the same time, this period witnessed a very important stage in the process from which modern science eventually emerged. My discussion will be aimed at uncovering the new enterprise, and the new distinctions which were taking shape in the early modern period under the (...)
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  14.  26
    The Oxford Handbook of Leibniz.Maria Rosa Antognazza (ed.) - 2013 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    "This handbook is currently in development, with individual articles publishing online in advance of print publication. At this time, we cannot add information about unpublished articles in this handbook, however the table of contents will continue to grow as additional articles pass through the review process and are added to the site. Please note that the online publication date for this handbook is the date that the first article in the title was published online. For more information, please read the (...)
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  15. Metaphysical evil revisited.Maria Rosa Antognazza - 2014 - In Larry M. Jorgensen & Samuel Newlands (eds.), New Essays on Leibniz’s Theodicy. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  16.  7
    Alsted and Leibniz: on God, the magistrate, and the millennium.Johann Heinrich Alsted, Maria Rosa Antognazza & Howard Hotson (eds.) - 1999 - Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz in Kommission.
  17. Faith and Reason.Maria Rosa Antognazza - 2013 - In The Oxford Handbook of Leibniz. New York: Oxford University Press.
    This contribution discusses Leibniz’s conception of faith and its relation to reason. It shows that, for Leibniz, faith embraces both cognitive and non-cognitive dimensions: although it must be grounded in reason, it is not merely reasonable belief. Moreover, for Leibniz, a truth of faith (like any truth) can never be contrary to reason but can be above the limits of comprehension of human reason. The latter is the epistemic status of the Christian mysteries. This view raises the problem of how (...)
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  18. Leibniz’s Metaphysical Evil Revisited.Maria Rosa Antognazza - 2014 - In Samuel Newlands Larry Jorgensen (ed.), New Essays on Leibniz’s Theodicy. Oxford University Press. pp. 112-134.
    The category of metaphysical evil introduced by Leibniz appears to cast a sinister shadow over the goodness of creation. It seems to imply that creatures, simply in virtue of not being gods, are to some degree intrinsically and inescapably evil. After briefly unpacking this difficulty and outlining a recent attempt to deal with it, this paper returns to the texts to propose a novel and multilayered understanding of Leibniz’s category of metaphysical evil by reading it against the backdrop of the (...)
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  19. The defence of the mysteries of the trinity and the incarnation: An example of Leibniz's 'other' reason.Maria Rosa Antognazza - 2001 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 9 (2):283 – 309.
    In this paper I will discuss certain aspects of Leibniz's theory and practice of 'soft reasoning' as exemplified by his defence of two central mysteries of the Christian revelation: the Trinity and the Incarnation. By theory and practice of 'soft' or 'broad' reasoning, I mean the development of rational strategies which can successefully be applied to the many areas of human understanding which escape strict demonstration, that is, the 'hard' or 'narrow' reasoning typical of mathematical argumentation. These strategies disclose an (...)
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  20. Truth and Toleration in Early Modern Thought.Maria Rosa Antognazza - forthcoming - In Whatmore Richard & Hunter Ian (eds.), Natural Law and Politics. Cambridge University Press.
    The issue discussed in this paper is as topical today as it was in the early modern period. The Reformation presented with heightened urgency the question of how to relate the system of beliefs and values regarded as fundamental by an established political community to alternative beliefs and values introduced by new groups and individuals. Through a discussion of the views on toleration advanced by some key early modern thinkers, this paper will revisit different ways of addressing this problem, focusing (...)
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  21. Philosophical Theology and Christian Doctrines.Maria Rosa Antognazza - 2013 - In The Oxford Handbook of Leibniz. New York: Oxford University Press.
    This contribution discusses Leibniz’s views on key Christian doctrines which were surrounded, in the early modern period, by particularly lively debates. The first section delves into his defence of the Trinity and the Incarnation against the charge of contradiction, and his exploration of metaphysical models capacious enough to accommodate these mysteries. The second section focuses on the resurrection and the Eucharist with special regard to their connections with Leibniz’s metaphysics of bodies. The third section investigates Leibniz’s position on predestination, grace, (...)
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  22. The Conformity of Faith with Reason in the “Discours Préliminaire” of the Theodicy.Maria Rosa Antognazza - 2011 - In Paul Rateau (ed.), Lectures et interprétations des Essais de théodicée de G. W. Leibniz. [Studia Leibnitiana Sonderhefte 40]. Steiner. pp. 231-245.
  23. Leibniz’s theory of substance and his metaphysics of the Incarnation.Maria Rosa Antognazza - 2015 - In Paul Lodge & Tom Stoneham (eds.), Locke and Leibniz on Substance. New York: Routledge. pp. 231-252.
    This paper explores the development of Leibniz’s metaphysics of the Incarnation in the context of his philosophy. In particular it asks to what extent Leibniz’s repeated endorsement of the traditional analogy between the union in humankind of soul (mind) and body, and the union in Christ of divine and human natures, could be accommodated by his more general metaphysical doctrines. Such an investigation highlights some of the deepest commitments in Leibniz’s theory of substance as well as detect in it some (...)
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  24. Leibniz’s doctrine of toleration: philosophical, theological and pragmatic reasons.Maria Rosa Antognazza - 2013 - In Jon Parkin & Timothy Stanton (eds.), Natural Law and Toleration in the Early Enlightenment. Oxford University Press. pp. 139-164.
    Leibniz is not commonly numbered amongst canonical writers on toleration. One obvious reason is that, unlike Locke, he wrote no treatise specifically devoted to that doctrine. Another is the enormous amount of energy which he famously devoted to ecclesiastical reunification. Promoting the reunification of Christian churches is an objective quite different from promoting the toleration of different religious faiths – so different, in fact, that they are sometimes even construed as mutually exclusive. Ecclesiastical reunification aims to find agreement at least (...)
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  25.  26
    Intuitive cognition in the Latin medieval tradition.Maria Rosa Antognazza - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 31 (4):675-692.
    ABSTRACT This paper explores some key features of Medieval accounts of intuition, focusing on Thomas Aquinas (1224/5–1274), on the one hand, and on Duns Scotus (c. 1266-1308), Peter Auriol (c. 1280–1322), and William Ockham (c. 1287-1347), on the other hand. The first section is devoted to the type of intuitive cognition which is accepted by all these authors, namely, the immediate and direct grasp of some present material object by the senses. It is from this basic sensory intuition – they (...)
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  26. Theory and Praxis in Leibniz’s Theological Thought.Maria Rosa Antognazza - forthcoming - In Irena Backus, Wenchao Li & Hartmut Rudolph (eds.), G. W. Leibniz im Lichte der Theologien [Leibniz in the Light of Theology]. Steiner.
    This paper re-assesses the place of theology in Leibniz’s thought focusing on the relationship between theory and praxis. It takes as its point of departure a general conclusion established in previous work, namely that Leibniz’s key formulations of his overarching plan for the reform and advancement of all the sciences, are devoted to a set of objectives which is both shaped by broadly theological concerns and ultimately practical. Against this backdrop, the discussion will then turn to an exploration of how (...)
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  27. Debilissimae Entitates?Maria Rosa Antognazza - 2001 - The Leibniz Review 11:1-22.
    Over the past decades a number of scholars have identified Johann Heinrich Bisterfeld as one of the most decisive early influences on Leibniz. In particular, the impressive similarity between their conceptions of universal harmony has been stressed. Since the issue of relations is at the heart of both Bisterfeld and Leibniz’s doctrines of universal harmony, the extent of the similarity between their doctrines will depend, however, on Bisterfeld and Leibniz’s respective theories of relations, and especially on their ontologies of relations. (...)
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  28. Arguments for the Existence of God: The Continental European Debate.Maria Rosa Antognazza - 2006 - In The Cambridge History of Eighteenth-Century Philosophy, Volume 2. Cambridge University Press.
    This chapter argues that the outbreak of the Protestant Reformation undermined the Christian consensus that unaided human reason could prove God’s existence. As a consequence the issue of the provability of God in principle gained new prominence and had to be addressed in the first instance before entering the discussion of specific proofs of His existence. On the basis of the answers given to the preliminary question of the provability of God’s existence, the chapter discusses eighteenth-century reformulations of a priori (...)
     
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  29. Die Rolle der Trinitäts-und Menschwerdungsdiskussionen für die Entstehung von Leibniz'Denken.Maria Rosa Antognazza - 1994 - Studia Leibnitiana 26 (1):56-75.
    Leibniz's repeated interventions in the Trinitarian polemics widespread throughout Europe in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries cannot merely be read as scholastic exercises or concessions to the conventions of his time. On the contrary, they involved reflection on issues fundamental to Leibniz's philosophical doctrines: issues such as the relationship between faith and reason, the limitations of the human intellect and the various grades of human knowledge, and the significance of the ' analogia Trinitatis' reconsidered in light of the concept of (...)
     
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  30.  25
    Subject, Object, and Knowledge as First-Person.Maria Rosa Antognazza - 2021 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 98 (4):516-529.
    This article tries to show that focusing on why and how subject and object are distinct is of key importance for understanding the nature of knowledge itself. It argues that: 1) cognition starts with an aliud which is present to a felt self in a way fundamentally different from one’s own modes of being; 2) individual human knowledge in its paradigmatic form is essentially first-personal, that is, its object-directedness requires a built-in, implicit awareness of a ‘self’ that provides the unifying (...)
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  31.  32
    Books for review and for listing here should be addressed to David Boersema, Review Editor, Department of Philosophy, Pacific University, Forest Grove, Oregon 97116.Michael J. Almeida, Maria Rosa Antognazza, Kim Atkins, Catriona Mac-Kenzie, Randall E. Auxier, Phillip S. Seng, Desmond Avery & H. E. Baber - 2009 - Teaching Philosophy 32 (4):427.
  32.  44
    Index of names and subjects.F. U. T. Aepinus, Archibald Alexander, Archibald Alison, John Anderson, Maria Rosa Antognazza, Thomas Aquinas, D. M. Armstrong, Antione Arnauld, J. L. Austin & Johann Sebastian Bach - 2004 - In Terence Cuneo & René van Woudenberg (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Thomas Reid. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. pp. 361.
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    Debilissimae Entitates? Bisterfeld and Leibniz’s Ontology of Relations.Maria Rosa Antognazza - 2001 - The Leibniz Review 11:1-22.
    Over the past decades a number of scholars have identified Johann Heinrich Bisterfeld as one of the most decisive early influences on Leibniz. In particular, the impressive similarity between their conceptions of universal harmony has been stressed. Since the issue of relations is at the heart of both Bisterfeld and Leibniz’s doctrines of universal harmony, the extent of the similarity between their doctrines will depend, however, on Bisterfeld and Leibniz’s respective theories of relations, and especially on their ontologies of relations. (...)
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    Debilissimae Entitates?Maria Rosa Antognazza - 2001 - The Leibniz Review 11:1-22.
    Over the past decades a number of scholars have identified Johann Heinrich Bisterfeld as one of the most decisive early influences on Leibniz. In particular, the impressive similarity between their conceptions of universal harmony has been stressed. Since the issue of relations is at the heart of both Bisterfeld and Leibniz’s doctrines of universal harmony, the extent of the similarity between their doctrines will depend, however, on Bisterfeld and Leibniz’s respective theories of relations, and especially on their ontologies of relations. (...)
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  35.  29
    Knowledge and religious belief.Maria Rosa Antognazza - 2021 - Think 20 (58):39-53.
    Introductions to epistemology routinely define knowledge as a kind of belief which meets certain criteria. In the first two sections of this article, I discuss this account and its application to religious epistemology by the influential movement known as Reformed Epistemology. In the last section, I argue that the controversial consequences drawn from this account by Reformed Epistemology offer one of the best illustrations of the untenability of a conception of knowledge as a kind of belief. I conclude by sketching (...)
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  36.  57
    Leibniz and the post-Copernican universe. Koyré revisited.Maria Rosa Antognazza - 2003 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 34 (2):309-327.
    This paper employs the revised conception of Leibniz emerging from recent research to reassess critically the ‘radical spiritual revolution’ which, according to Alexandre Koyré’s landmark book, From the closed world to the infinite universe was precipitated in the seventeenth century by the revolutions in physics, astronomy, and cosmology. While conceding that the cosmological revolution necessitated a reassessment of the place of value-concepts within cosmology, it argues that this reassessment did not entail a spiritual revolution of the kind assumed by Koyré, (...)
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  37.  52
    Leibniz lecteur de Spinoza.Maria Rosa Antognazza - 2009 - The Leibniz Review 19:71-75.
  38. Natural and supernatural mysteries: Leibniz’s Annotatiunculae subitaneae on Toland’s Christianity not Mysterious.Maria Rosa Antognazza - 2013 - In Winfried Schröder (ed.), Gestalten des Deismus in Europa. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz Verlag. pp. 29-40.
  39.  26
    Protogaea.Maria Rosa Antognazza - 2010 - Annals of Science 67 (2):281-283.
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  40. Previously unpublished works by Leibniz on controversies about the trinity.Maria Rosa Antognazza - 1991 - Rivista di Filosofia Neo-Scolastica 83 (4):525-550.
     
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  41.  31
    Rationalism.Maria Rosa Antognazza - 2013 - In Roger Crisp (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the History of Ethics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    This chapter examines the moral philosophy of four early modern thinkers – Descartes, Malebranche, Leibniz, and Spinoza – who affirm in different ways the Platonic intuition of the priority of the perfect or infinite over the limited beings of which we have experience. In making this affirmation, Descartes, Malebranche, and Leibniz share the framework of a substantially traditional conception of God. Spinoza, on the other hand, challenges the Christianized Platonism of the other three while stretching to the extreme some features (...)
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  42. The Cambridge History of Eighteenth-Century Philosophy, Volume 2.Maria Rosa Antognazza - 2006 - Cambridge University Press.
     
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  43. Il rapporto fede-ragione nel pensiero Leibniziano.Maria Rosa Antognazza - 2010 - Rivista di Filosofia Neo-Scolastica 102 (4):619-632.
     
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  44.  30
    Unity in Multiplicity.Maria Rosa Antognazza - 2017 - The Philosophers' Magazine 77:62-65.
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  45. Knowing and Seeing.Michael Ayers & Maria Rosa Antognazza (eds.) - 2019 - Oxford, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press.
    What is knowledge? What, if anything, can we know? In Knowing and Seeing, Michael Ayers recovers the insight in the traditional distinction between knowledge and belief, according to which 'knowledge' stems from direct and perspicuous cognitive contact with ('seeing') its object, whereas 'belief' relies on 'extraneous' justification. He conducts a careful phenomenological analysis of what it is to perceive one's environment as one's environment, the result of which is not only direct realism, but recognition that in being perceptually aware of (...)
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  46.  92
    Leibniz's Metaphysics: Its Origins and Development (review).Maria Rosa Antognazza - 2003 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 41 (1):131-132.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Journal of the History of Philosophy 41.1 (2003) 131-132 [Access article in PDF] Christia Mercer. Leibniz's Metaphysics: Its Origins and Development. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2001. Pp. xiii + 528. Cloth, $80.00. Christia Mercer's massive study is aimed at unearthing the hidden roots of Leibniz's metaphysics by placing the German philosopher back in the intellectual context within which his thought first took shape. In so doing she stresses (...)
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  47.  4
    Trinità e incarnazione: il rapporto tra filosofia e teologia rivelata nel pensiero di Leibniz.Maria Rosa Antognazza - 1999 - Milano: Vita e pensiero.
  48.  38
    The Leibniz-Des Bosses Correspondence.Maria Rosa Antognazza - 2009 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 17 (2):424-428.
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    … Aliorum diligentiae relinquo.Enrico Pasini, Margherita Palumbo, Giovanna Varani, Maria Rosa Antognazza, Luca Fonnesu & Roberto Palaia - 2012 - In Wenchao Li (ed.), Komma Und Kathedrale: Tradition, Bedeutung Und Herausforderung der Leibniz-Edition. Berlin: De Gruyter. pp. 225-234.
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    Leibniz lecteur de Spinoza. [REVIEW]Maria Rosa Antognazza - 2009 - The Leibniz Review 19:71-75.