Results for 'Maria Gendron Lisa Feldman Barrett, Kristen A. Lindquist'

983 found
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  1.  58
    Language as context for the perception of emotion.Maria Gendron Lisa Feldman Barrett, Kristen A. Lindquist - 2007 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (8):327.
  2.  77
    Language as context for the perception of emotion.Lisa Feldman Barrett, Kristen A. Lindquist & Maria Gendron - 2007 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (8):327-332.
  3. The brain basis of emotion: A meta-analytic review.Kristen A. Lindquist, Tor D. Wager, Hedy Kober, Eliza Bliss-Moreau & Lisa Feldman Barrett - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (3):121-143.
    Researchers have wondered how the brain creates emotions since the early days of psychological science. With a surge of studies in affective neuroscience in recent decades, scientists are poised to answer this question. In this target article, we present a meta-analytic summary of the neuroimaging literature on human emotion. We compare the locationist approach (i.e., the hypothesis that discrete emotion categories consistently and specifically correspond to distinct brain regions) with the psychological constructionist approach (i.e., the hypothesis that discrete emotion categories (...)
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  4. A functional architecture of the human brain: emerging insights from the science of emotion.Kristen A. Lindquist & Lisa Feldman Barrett - 2012 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 16 (11):533-540.
  5.  92
    What are emotions and how are they created in the brain?Kristen A. Lindquist, Tor D. Wager, Eliza Bliss-Moreau, Hedy Kober & Lisa Feldman Barrett - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (3):172-202.
    In our response, we clarify important theoretical differences between basic emotion and psychological construction approaches. We evaluate the empirical status of the basic emotion approach, addressing whether it requires brain localization, whether localization can be observed with better analytic tools, and whether evidence for basic emotions exists in other types of measures. We then revisit the issue of whether the key hypotheses of psychological construction are supported by our meta-analytic findings. We close by elaborating on commentator suggestions for future research.
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  6. The embodiment of emotion.Lisa Feldman Barrett & Kristen A. Lindquist - 2008 - In Gün R. Semin & Eliot R. Smith (eds.), Embodied grounding: social, cognitive, affective, and neuroscientific approaches. New York: Cambridge University Press.
  7.  83
    What’s in a Word? Language Constructs Emotion Perception.Kristen A. Lindquist & Maria Gendron - 2013 - Emotion Review 5 (1):66-71.
    In this review, we highlight evidence suggesting that concepts represented in language are used to create a perception of emotion from the constant ebb and flow of other people’s facial muscle movements. In this “construction hypothesis,” (cf. Gendron, Lindquist, Barsalou, & Barrett, 2012) (see also Barrett, 2006b; Barrett, Lindquist, & Gendron, 2007; Barrett, Mesquita, & Gendron, 2011), language plays a constitutive role in emotion perception because words ground the otherwise highly variable instances of an emotion (...)
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  8.  55
    The role of the amygdala in the appraising brain.David Sander, Kristen A. Lindquist, Tor D. Wager, Hedy Kober, Eliza Bliss-Moreau & Lisa Feldman Barrett - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (3):161-161.
    Lindquist et al. convincingly argue that the brain implements psychological operations that are constitutive of emotion rather than modules subserving discrete emotions. However, thenatureof such psychological operations is open to debate. I argue that considering appraisal theories may provide alternative interpretations of the neuroimaging data with respect to the psychological operations involved.
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  9.  37
    Reconstructing the Past: A Century of Ideas About Emotion in Psychology.Maria Gendron & Lisa Feldman Barrett - 2009 - Emotion Review 1 (4):316-339.
    Within the discipline of psychology, the conventional history outlines the development of two fundamental approaches to the scientific study of emotion—“basic emotion” and “appraisal” traditions. In this article, we outline the development of a third approach to emotion that exists in the psychological literature—the “psychological constructionist” tradition. In the process, we discuss a number of works that have virtually disappeared from the citation trail in psychological discussions of emotion. We also correct some misconceptions about early sources, such as work by (...)
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  10.  68
    Reconstructing the Past: A Century of Ideas About Emotion in Psychology.Maria Gendron & Lisa Feldman Barrett - 2009 - Emotion Review 1 (4):316.
    Within the discipline of psychology, the conventional history outlines the development of two fundamental approaches to the scientific study of emotion—“basic emotion” and “appraisal” traditions. In this article, we outline the development of a third approach to emotion that exists in the psychological literature—the “psychological constructionist” tradition. In the process, we discuss a number of works that have virtually disappeared from the citation trail in psychological discussions of emotion. We also correct some misconceptions about early sources, such as work by (...)
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  11.  49
    Emotion Perception as Conceptual Synchrony.Maria Gendron & Lisa Feldman Barrett - 2018 - Emotion Review 10 (2):101-110.
    Psychological research on emotion perception anchors heavily on an object perception analogy. We present static “cues,” such as facial expressions, as objects for perceivers to categorize. Yet in the real world, emotions play out as dynamic multidimensional events. Current theoretical approaches and research methods are limited in their ability to capture this complexity. We draw on insights from a predictive coding account of neural activity and a grounded cognition account of concept representation to conceive of emotion perception as a stream (...)
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  12.  63
    Understanding emotion: Lessons from anxiety.Katherine S. Button, Glyn Lewis, Marcus R. Munafò, Kristen A. Lindquist, Tor D. Wager, Hedy Kober, Eliza Bliss-Moreau & Lisa Feldman Barrett - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (3):145.
    We agree that conceptualisation is key in understanding the brain basis of emotion. We argue that by conflating facial emotion recognition with subjective emotion experience, Lindquist et al. understate the importance of biological predisposition in emotion. We use examples from the anxiety disorders to illustrate the distinction between these two phenomena, emphasising the importance of both emotional hardware and contextual learning.
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  13. Do discrete emotions exist?Yang-Ming Huang, Maria Gendron & Lisa Feldman Barrett - 2009 - Philosophical Psychology 22 (4):427-437.
    In various guises (usually referred to as the “basic emotion” or “discrete emotion” approach), scientists and philosophers have long argued that certain categories of emotion are natural kinds. In a recent paper, Colombetti (2009) proposed yet another natural kind account, and in so doing, characterized and critiqued psychological constructionist approaches to emotion, including our own Conceptual Act Model. In this commentary, we briefly address three topics raised by Columbetti. First, we correct several common misperceptions about the discrete emotion approach to (...)
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  14.  23
    The Psychological Construction of Emotion.Lisa Feldman Barrett & James A. Russell (eds.) - 2014 - Guilford Press.
    This volume presents cutting-edge theory and research on emotions as constructed events rather than fixed, essential entities. It provides a thorough introduction to the assumptions, hypotheses, and scientific methods that embody psychological constructionist approaches. Leading scholars examine the neurobiological, cognitive/perceptual, and social processes that give rise to the experiences Western cultures call sadness, anger, fear, and so on. The book explores such compelling questions as how the brain creates emotional experiences, whether the "ingredients" of emotions also give rise to other (...)
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  15.  30
    How emotions are made: the secret life of the brain.Lisa Feldman Barrett - 2017 - Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.
    A new theory of how the brain constructs emotions that could revolutionize psychology, health care, law enforcement, and our understanding of the human mind Emotions feel automatic, like uncontrollable reactions to things we think and experience. Scientists have long supported this assumption by claiming that emotions are hardwired in the body or the brain. Today, however, the science of emotion is in the midst of a revolution on par with the discovery of relativity in physics and natural selection in biology--and (...)
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  16.  47
    Are Women the “More Emotional” Sex? Evidence From Emotional Experiences in Social Context.Lisa Feldman Barrett, Lucy Robin, Paula R. Pietromonaco & Kristen M. Eyssell - 1998 - Cognition and Emotion 12 (4):555-578.
  17.  79
    The experience of emotion.Lisa Feldman Barrett - 2005 - In Lisa Feldman Barrett, Paula M. Niedenthal & Piotr Winkielman (eds.), Emotion and Consciousness. Guilford Press.
    Experiences of emotion are content-rich events that emerge at the level of psychological description, but must be causally constituted by neurobiological processes. This chapter outlines an emerging scientific agenda for understanding what these experiences feel like and how they arise. We review the available answers to what is felt (i.e., the content that makes up an experience of emotion) and how neurobiological processes instantiate these properties of experience. These answers are then integrated into a broad framework that describes, in psychological (...)
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  18.  67
    Psychological Construction: The Darwinian Approach to the Science of Emotion.Lisa Feldman Barrett - 2013 - Emotion Review 5 (4):379-389.
    Psychological construction constitutes a different paradigm for the scientific study of emotion when compared to the current paradigm that is inspired by faculty psychology. This new paradigm is more consistent with the post-Darwinian conceptual framework in biology that includes a focus on (a) population thinking (vs. typologies), (b) domain-general core systems (vs. physical essences), and (c) constructive analysis (vs. reductionism). Three psychological construction approaches (the OCC model, the iterative reprocessing model, and the conceptual act theory) are discussed with respect to (...)
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  19. The Conceptual Act Theory: A Précis.Lisa Feldman Barrett - 2014 - Emotion Review 6 (4):292-297.
    According to the conceptual act theory, emotions emerge when physical sensations in the self and physical actions in others are meaningfully linked to situations during a process that can be called both cognitive and perceptual (creating emotional experiences, and emotion perceptions, respectively). There are key four hypotheses: (a) an emotion (like anger) is a conceptual category, populated with instances that are tailored to the environment; (b) each instance of emotion is constructed within the brain’s functional architecture of domain-general core systems; (...)
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  20.  45
    Variety is the spice of life: A psychological construction approach to understanding variability in emotion.Lisa Feldman Barrett - 2009 - Cognition and Emotion 23 (7):1284-1306.
  21.  76
    Knowing what you 're feeling and knowing what to do about it: Mapping the relation between emotion differentiation and emotion regulation'.Lisa Feldman Barrett, James Gross, Tamlin Conner Christensen & Michael Benvenuto - 2001 - Cognition and Emotion 15 (6):713-724.
    Individuals differ considerably in their emotion experience. Some experience emotions in a highly differentiated manner, clearly distinguishing among a variety of negative and positive discrete emotions. Others experience emotions in a relatively undifferentiated manner, treating a range of like-valence terms as interchangeable. Drawing on self-regulation theory, we hypothesised that individuals with highly differentiated emotion experience should be better able to regulate emotions than individuals with poorly differentiated emotion experience. In particular, we hypothesised that emotion differentiation and emotion regulation would be (...)
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  22.  50
    Discrete Emotions or Dimensions? The Role of Valence Focus and Arousal Focus.Lisa Feldman Barrett - 1998 - Cognition and Emotion 12 (4):579-599.
    The present study provides evidence that valence focus and arousal focus are important processes in determining whether a dimensional or a discrete emotion model best captures how people label their affective states. Individuals high in valence focus and low in arousal focus fit a dimensional model better in that they reported more co-occurrences among like-valenced affective states, whereas those lower in valence focus and higher in arousal focus fit a discrete model better in that they reported fewer co-occurrences between like-valenced (...)
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  23.  99
    Emotion Generation and Emotion Regulation: One or Two Depends on Your Point of View.James J. Gross & Lisa Feldman Barrett - 2011 - Emotion Review 3 (1):8-16.
    Emotion regulation has the odd distinction of being a wildly popular construct whose scientific existence is in considerable doubt. In this article, we discuss the confusion about whether emotion generation and emotion regulation can and should be distinguished from one another. We describe a continuum of perspectives on emotion, and highlight how different (often mutually incompatible) perspectives on emotion lead to different views about whether emotion generation and emotion regulation can be usefully distinguished. We argue that making differences in perspective (...)
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  24.  64
    Affect is a form of cognition: A neurobiological analysis.Seth Duncan & Lisa Feldman Barrett - 2007 - Cognition and Emotion 21 (6):1184-1211.
    In this paper, we suggest that affect meets the traditional definition of “cognition” such that the affect–cognition distinction is phenomenological, rather than ontological. We review how the affect–cognition distinction is not respected in the human brain, and discuss the neural mechanisms by which affect influences sensory processing. As a result of this sensory modulation, affect performs several basic “cognitive” functions. Affect appears to be necessary for normal conscious experience, language fluency, and memory. Finally, we suggest that understanding the differences between (...)
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  25.  57
    Concepts dissolve artificial boundaries in the study of emotion and cognition, uniting body, brain, and mind.Katie Hoemann & Lisa Feldman Barrett - 2018 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (1):67-76.
    Theories of emotion have often maintained artificial boundaries: for instance, that cognition and emotion are separable, and that an emotion concept is separable from the emotional events that comprise its category (e.g. “fear” is distinct from instances of fear). Over the past several years, research has dissolved these artificial boundaries, suggesting instead that conceptual construction is a domain-general process—a process by which the brain makes meaning of the world. The brain constructs emotion concepts, but also cognitions and perceptions, all in (...)
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  26.  73
    What's reason got to do with it? Affect as the foundation of learning.Eliza Bliss-Moreau & Lisa Feldman Barrett - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (2):201-202.
    We propose that learning has a top-down component, but not in the propositional terms described by Mitchell et al. Specifically, we propose that a host of learning processes, including associative learning, serve to imbue the representation of the conditioned stimulus (CS) with affective meaning.
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  27. More than a body: Mind perception and the nature of objectification.Kurt Gray, Joshua Knobe, Mark Sheskin, Paul Bloom & Lisa Feldman Barrett - 2011 - Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 101 (6):1207-1220.
    According to models of objectification, viewing someone as a body induces de-mentalization, stripping away their psychological traits. Here evidence is presented for an alternative account, where a body focus does not diminish the attribution of all mental capacities but, instead, leads perceivers to infer a different kind of mind. Drawing on the distinction in mind perception between agency and experience, it is found that focusing on someone's body reduces perceptions of agency but increases perceptions of experience. These effects were found (...)
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  28.  44
    Comment: Emotions Are Abstract, Conceptual Categories That Are Learned by a Predicting Brain.Katie Hoemann, Madeleine Devlin & Lisa Feldman Barrett - 2020 - Emotion Review 12 (4):253-255.
    In their review, Ruba and Repacholi summarize the methods used to assess preverbal infants’ understanding of emotions, and analyze the existing evidence in light of classical and constructionist ac...
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  29.  42
    Heightened sensitivity to emotional expressions in generalised anxiety disorder, compared to social anxiety disorder, and controls.Eric Bui, Eric Anderson, Elizabeth M. Goetter, Allison A. Campbell, Laura E. Fischer, Lisa Feldman Barrett & Naomi M. Simon - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (1):119-126.
  30.  21
    On the neural implausibility of the modular mind: Evidence for distributed construction dissolves boundaries between perception, cognition, and emotion.Leor M. Hackel, Grace M. Larson, Jeffrey D. Bowen, Gaven A. Ehrlich, Thomas C. Mann, Brianna Middlewood, Ian D. Roberts, Julie Eyink, Janell C. Fetterolf, Fausto Gonzalez, Carlos O. Garrido, Jinhyung Kim, Thomas C. O'Brien, Ellen E. O'Malley, Batja Mesquita & Lisa Feldman Barrett - 2016 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 39.
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  31.  21
    RETRACTED: When Words Hurt: Affective Word Use in Daily News Coverage Impacts Mental Health.Jolie B. Wormwood, Madeleine Devlin, Yu-Ru Lin, Lisa Feldman Barrett & Karen S. Quigley - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9:370118.
    Media exposure influences mental health symptomology in response to salient aversive events, like terrorist attacks, but little has been done to explore the impact of news coverage that varies more subtly in affective content. Here, we utilized an existing data set in which participants self-reported physical symptoms, depressive symptoms, and anxiety symptoms, and completed a potentiated startle task assessing their physiological reactivity to aversive stimuli at three time points (waves) over a 9-month period. Using a computational linguistics approach, we then (...)
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  32.  15
    The Philosophy of Emotion in Buddhist Philosophy (and a Close Look at Remorse and Regret).Maria Heim - 2019 - Journal of Buddhist Philosophy 5 (1):2-25.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:The Philosophy of Emotion in Buddhist Philosophy (and a Close Look at Remorse and Regret)Maria HeimIt is an honor to guest-edit a special issue for the Journal of Buddhist Philosophy for its inaugural issue, and even more to be invited to write a somewhat longer article than is typically the privilege of the guest editor. It was thought that something of a broader statement of the state of (...)
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  33. The role of the amygdala in visual awareness.Lisa Feldman Barrett Seth Duncan - 2007 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (5):190.
  34.  94
    Emotion and Consciousness.Lisa Feldman Barrett, Paula M. Niedenthal & Piotr Winkielman (eds.) - 2005 - New York: Guilford Press.
    Presenting state-of-the-art work on the conscious and unconscious processes involved in emotion, this integrative volume brings together leading psychologists, ...
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  35. On the automaticity of emotion.Lisa Feldman Barrett, Kevin N. Ochsner & James J. Gross - 2007 - In John A. Bargh (ed.), Social Psychology and the Unconscious: The Automaticity of Higher Mental Processes. Frontiers of Social Psychology. Psychology Press. pp. 173-217.
  36.  62
    Feeling is perceiving: Core affect and conceptualization in the experience of emotion.Lisa Feldman Barrett - 2005 - In Lisa Feldman Barrett, Paula M. Niedenthal & Piotr Winkielman (eds.), Emotion and Consciousness. Guilford Press. pp. 255-284.
  37.  24
    Mental representations of affect knowledge.Lisa Feldman Barrett & Thyra Fossum - 2001 - Cognition and Emotion 15 (3):333-363.
  38.  80
    Emotions Emerge from More Basic Psychological Ingredients: A Modern Psychological Constructionist Model.Kristen A. Lindquist - 2013 - Emotion Review 5 (4):356-368.
    Over a century ago, William James outlined the first psychological constructionist model of emotion, arguing that emotions are phenomena constructed of more basic psychological parts. In this article, I outline a modern psychological constructionist model of emotion. I first explore the history of psychological construction to demonstrate that psychological constructionist models have historically emerged in an attempt to explain variability in emotion that cannot be accounted for by other approaches. I next discuss the modern psychological constructionist model of emotion that (...)
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  39.  22
    The role of language in emotion: predictions from psychological constructionism.Kristen A. Lindquist, Jennifer K. MacCormack & Holly Shablack - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
  40.  30
    Mental representations of affect knowledge.Lisa Feldman Barrett & Thyra Fossum - 2001 - Cognition and Emotion 15 (3):333-363.
  41. Introductory chapter.Lisa Feldman Barrett, Paula Niedenthal & Piotr Winkielman - 2005 - In Lisa Feldman Barrett, Paula M. Niedenthal & Piotr Winkielman (eds.), Emotion and Consciousness. Guilford Press.
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  42.  46
    Hedonic Tone, Perceived Arousal, and Item Desirability: Three Components of Self-reported Mood.Lisa Feldman Barrett - 1996 - Cognition and Emotion 10 (1):47-68.
  43.  43
    Intelligent emotion regulation.Tanja Wranik, Lisa Feldman Barrett & Peter Salovey - 2007 - In James J. Gross (ed.), Handbook of Emotion Regulation. Guilford Press.
  44. Affect as embodied evidence in attitude, advertising, and art.L. Feldman Barrett& K. Lindquist - 2008 - In Gün R. Semin & Eliot R. Smith (eds.), Embodied grounding: social, cognitive, affective, and neuroscientific approaches. New York: Cambridge University Press.
  45. Introduction to the Special Section.Lisa Feldman Barrett - 2010 - Emotion Review 2 (3):203-203.
  46.  24
    Bodily Contributions to Emotion: Schachter’s Legacy for a Psychological Constructionist View on Emotion.Jennifer K. MacCormack & Kristen A. Lindquist - 2017 - Emotion Review 9 (1):36-45.
    Although early emotion theorists posited that bodily changes contribute to emotion, the primary view in affective science over the last century has been that emotions produce bodily changes. Recent findings from physiology, neuroscience, and neuropsychology support the early intuition that body representations can help constitute emotion. These findings are consistent with the modern psychological constructionist hypothesis that emotions emerge when representations of bodily changes are conceptualized as an instance of emotion. We begin by introducing the psychological constructionist approach to emotion. (...)
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  47.  18
    Comment: Constructionism is a Multilevel Framework for Affective Science.Kristen A. Lindquist & Jennifer K. MacCormack - 2014 - Emotion Review 6 (2):134-135.
    We point out that constructionist models from experimental psychology account for the sociocultural, psychological, and neural levels of analysis in emotion. Individual constructionist models form a “metamodel” that integrates the levels of analysis important to a science of emotion. By clarifying the multilevel nature of constructionism, we hope to help lay a strong foundation for future cross-disciplinary collaborations.
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  48.  15
    Essentialist Biases in Reasoning About Emotions.Iris Berent, Lisa Feldman Barrett & Melanie Platt - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
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  49.  41
    Situation selection is a particularly effective emotion regulation strategy for people who need help regulating their emotions.Thomas L. Webb, Kristen A. Lindquist, Katelyn Jones, Aya Avishai & Paschal Sheeran - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 32 (2):231-248.
    Situation selection involves choosing situations based on their likely emotional impact and may be less cognitively taxing or challenging to implement compared to other strategies for regulating emotion, which require people to regulate their emotions “in the moment”; we thus predicted that individuals who chronically experience intense emotions or who are not particularly competent at employing other emotion regulation strategies would be especially likely to benefit from situation selection. Consistent with this idea, we found that the use of situation selection (...)
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  50.  33
    Language is Powerful.Kristen A. Lindquist - 2009 - Emotion Review 1 (1):16-18.
    As Wierzbicka suggests in her recent review, language is powerful in emotion. Wierzbicka's solution is to remove the linguistically relative aspects of emotion concepts, like icing from a cake, to reveal the universal meanings below. In the present commentary, I suggest that language is a more fundamental ingredient in emotion than Wierzbicka's solution assumes; language can be no more removed from emotion, than flour can be removed from an already baked cake. As an alternate solution, I present a constructionist view (...)
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