31 found
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  1. Leaky bodies and boundaries: feminism, postmodernism and (bio)ethics.Margrit Shildrick - 1997 - New York: Routledge.
    Drawing on postmodernist analyses, Leaky Bodies and Boundaries presents a feminist investigation into the marginalization of women within western discourse that denies both female moral agency and bodylines. With reference to contemporary and historical issues in biomedicine, the book argues that the boundaries of both the subject and the body are no longer secure. The aim is both to valorize women and to suggest that "leakiness" may be the very ground for a postmodern feminist ethic. The contribution made by Margrit (...)
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  2.  15
    Staying Alive: Affect, Identity and Anxiety in Organ Transplantation.Margrit Shildrick - 2015 - Body and Society 21 (3):20-41.
    The field of human organ transplantation, and most particularly that of heart transplantation where the donor is always deceased, is one in which the rhetoric of hope leaves little room for any exploration or understanding of the more negative emotions and affects that recipients may experience. Where a donated heart is commonly referred to as the ‘gift of life’, both in lay discourse and by those engaged in transplantation procedures, how does this imbricate with the alternative clinical term of a (...)
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  3.  12
    Some Reflections on the Socio-cultural and Bioscientific Limits of Bodily Integrity.Margrit Shildrick - 2010 - Body and Society 16 (3):11-22.
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  4. “Why Should Our Bodies End at the Skin?”: Embodiment, Boundaries, and Somatechnics.Margrit Shildrick - 2015 - Hypatia 30 (1):13-29.
    Donna Haraway's enduring question—“Why should our bodies end at the skin?” —is ever more relevant in the postmodern era, where issues of bodies, boundaries, and technologies increasingly challenge not only the normative performance of the human subject, but also the very understanding of what counts as human. Critical Disability Studies has taken up the problematic of technology, particularly in relation to the deployment of prostheses by people with disabilities. Yet rehabilitation to normative practice or appearance is no longer the point; (...)
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  5.  19
    Corporeal Cuts: Surgery and the Psycho-social.Margrit Shildrick - 2008 - Body and Society 14 (1):31-46.
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  6.  13
    Living On; Not Getting Better.Margrit Shildrick - 2015 - Feminist Review 111 (1):10-24.
    The contemporary emergence of the concept ‘debility’, which pertains to a broad swathe of humanity whose ordinary lives simply persist without ever getting better, shares a time span with an acute critique of neo-liberal biopolitics. Where capital has historically relied on a population that through its labour necessarily becomes debilitated, the newer model of understanding references the intrinsic profitability of debility itself. The two dimensions overlap and co-exist, but what I shall pursue here are the implications of recognising that, at (...)
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  7.  53
    The critical turn in feminist bioethics: The case of heart transplantation.Margrit Shildrick - 2008 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 1 (1):28-47.
    Given previously successful interventions that already have shaken up the convention, it is puzzling that the feminist critique of bioethics should be slow to embrace the exciting new developments that have emerged in philosophy and critical cultural studies over the last fifteen years or so. Both in the arenas of poststructuralism and postmodernism and in the powerful revival of phenomenological thought, in which the stress on embodiment is highly appropriate to bioethics, there is much that might augment the adequacy of (...)
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  8.  5
    Estranged Bodies: Shifting Paradigms and the Biomedical Imaginary.Deborah Lynn Steinberg & Margrit Shildrick - 2015 - Body and Society 21 (3):3-19.
    This introductory article provides a contextual and theoretical overview to this special issue of Body & Society. The special issue presents five selected case studies – focusing on the contexts of transplantation, psychiatry, amputation and war, and a transvalued media ecology of cancer – to offer meditations on a number of interlinked questions. The first of these is the entanglement of biomedical governance – political/economic as well as self-disciplinary – with the nexus of estrangement, which can denote both the distancing (...)
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  9.  80
    Breaking the Boundaries of the Broken Body.Margrit Shildrick & Janet Price - 1996 - Body and Society 2 (4):93-113.
  10.  28
    This Body Which is Not One: Dealing with Differences.Margrit Shildrick - 1999 - Body and Society 5 (2-3):77-92.
    While body modification might generally seem to take the form of denaturalizing a biological given, this article looks at the same practice as normalizing the always already unstable corpus. The dominant discourse of the post-Enlightenment relies on the notion of the centrality of the individual subject within the singular and separate body, where distinctions between self and other are secure. Against this the incidence of monstrosity in general, with its disordered crossing of the boundaries of the proper, offers a gross (...)
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  11.  39
    Some speculations on matters of touch.Margrit Shildrick - 2001 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 26 (4):387 – 404.
    In this essay, I examine the question of whether it is possible that the encounter with the other could be mediated such that the interval of distance would lose its determining power. I reflect on some instances of extraordinary corporeality, most particularly the phenomenon of conjoined twins, in order to problematize the relation between subjects as they are embodied. Where the normative body is supposedly marked out by the closed boundaries of the skin, the figuration of the anomalous body as (...)
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  12. Bodies together: Touch, ethics and disability.Margrit Shildrick & Janet Price - 2002 - In Mairian Corker Tom Shakespeare (ed.), Disability/Postmodernity: Embodying Disability Theory. pp. 63--75.
     
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  13.  91
    Posthumanism and the Monstrous Body.Margrit Shildrick - 1996 - Body and Society 2 (1):1-15.
  14.  8
    Reappraising feminist ethics: Developments and debates.Margrit Shildrick - 2001 - Feminist Theory 2 (2):233-244.
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  15.  16
    Individuality, Identity and Supplementarity in Transcorporeal Embodiment.Margrit Shildrick - 2017 - In Thomas Schwarz Wentzer, Martin Gustafsson & Kevin M. Cahill (eds.), Finite but Unbounded: New Approaches in Philosophical Anthropology. Boston: De Gruyter. pp. 153-172.
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  16.  4
    Genetics, Normativity, and Ethics: Some Bioethical Concerns.Margrit Shildrick - 2004 - Feminist Theory 5 (2):149-165.
    Where feminist critiques of bioscience have uncovered a whole set of operations that range round the Foucauldian notions of biopower and normativity, and have explored genetic discourse in particular to question the stability of self-identity, feminist bioethics has lagged behind. Despite an engagement with the technologies of postmodernity, including those associated with genetic research (and especially in its relation to reproduction), there has been, with relatively few exceptions, a reluctance to explore the implications of postmodernist theory. The difficulty is that (...)
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  17. Beyond Bodily Integrity.Margrit Shildrick - 2024 - De Ethica 8 (1):42-58.
    My focus on vulnerability and bioethics – which acknowledges but goes beyond mainstream feminist ethics - will take a phenomenological perspective that understands the self as having no meaning or existence beyond its embodiment. As such we are always open, and therefore vulnerable, to the constant changes of embodied experience. The transformations in embodiment are both necessary for development and continuous over the life course, but it is only when something breaks the cycle of normative development that the intimation of (...)
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  18.  13
    Levinas, politics and responsibility.Margrit Shildrick - 2007 - In Robin May Schott & Kirsten Klercke (eds.), Philosophy on the border. Lancaster: Gazelle Drake Academic [distributor]. pp. 63.
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  19.  8
    Maternal–Fetal Microchimerism and Genetic Origins: Some Socio-legal Implications.Margrit Shildrick - 2022 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 47 (6):1231-1252.
    What are the implications of microchimerism in sociocultural and ethico-legal contexts, particularly as they relate to the destabilization of genetic origins? Conventional biomedicine and related law have been reluctant to acknowledge microchimerism—the existence of unassimilated traces of genetic material that result in some cells in the body coding differently from the dominant DNA—despite it becoming increasingly evident that microchimerism is ubiquitous in the human population. One exception is maternal–fetal microchimerism which has long been recognized, albeit with little consideration of the (...)
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  20.  47
    Monstrous reflections on the mirror of the self-same.Margrit Shildrick - 2006 - In Deborah Orr (ed.), Belief, Bodies, and Being: Feminist Reflections on Embodiment. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers. pp. 37--48.
  21.  35
    Queer phenomenology: Orientations, objects, others.Margrit Shildrick - 2009 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 17 (4):632 – 635.
  22.  20
    Reconfiguring the Bioethics of Reproduction.Margrit Shildrick - 2004 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 11 (1):77-85.
    The paper contends that, despite critiquing certain aspects of modernist thought feminist bioethics has become stuck in its own inadequate paradigms that pay insufficient attention to either the theoretical insights of postmodernism, or to the capacities of biotechnology in the postmodern era to disrupt prior certainties. In the face of an incalculable expansion of both theoretical and material possibilities, feminist bioethicists working in the field of reproduction have remained largely unwilling to reconfigure notions such as embodiment, subjectivity, agency, and so (...)
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  23.  56
    The minority body: A theory of disability.Margrit Shildrick - 2020 - Contemporary Political Theory 19 (1):82-85.
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  24.  14
    The universal (in the realm of the sensible). By Dorothea Olkowski.Margrit Shildrick - 2009 - Hypatia 24 (1):205-208.
  25.  30
    When Species Meet.Margrit Shildrick - 2008 - Society and Animals 16 (4):373-375.
  26.  58
    Becoming Vulnerable: Contagious Encounters and the Ethics of Risk. [REVIEW]Margrit Shildrick - 2000 - Journal of Medical Humanities 21 (4):215-227.
    In western discourse the notion of the contagious, the unclean or the contaminated is never just a neutral descriptor but carries the weight of all that stands against—and paradoxically secures—the categories of normative ontology and epistemology. Set against the ideal closure and invulnerability of the self's “clean and proper body,” this paper investigates the condition of disability as a potentially contaminatory threat. But the given precarious psychic constitution of the subject, and the ontological insecurity of self performativity, can we reconfigure (...)
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  27. Deciding on death: Conventions and contestations in the context of disability. [REVIEW]Margrit Shildrick - 2008 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 5 (2-3):209-219.
    Conflicts between bioethicists and disability theorists often arise over the permissibility of euthanasia and physician assisted suicide. Where mainstream bioethicists propose universalist guidelines that will direct action across a range of effectively disembodied situations, and take for granted that moral agency requires autonomy, feminist bioethicists demand a contextualisation of the circumstances under which moral decision making is conducted, and stress a more relational view of autonomy that does not require strict standards of independent agency. Nonetheless, neither traditional nor feminist perspectives (...)
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  28.  37
    Book review: Jonathan Glover. Humanity: A moral history of the twentieth century. New Haven and London: Yale university press, 2001. [REVIEW]Margrit Shildrick - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (2):227-229.
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  29.  7
    Book Review: Feminist Philosophy Reappraised. [REVIEW]Margrit Shildrick - 2005 - European Journal of Women's Studies 12 (4):489-494.
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  30.  14
    Book review: Jonathan Glover. Humanity: A moral history of the twentieth century. New Haven and London: Yale university press, 2001. [REVIEW]Margrit Shildrick - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (2):227-229.
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  31.  16
    Deviant Bodies: Critical Perspectives on Science and Difference in Popular Culture edited by Jennifer Terry and Jacqueline Urla. [REVIEW]Margrit Shildrick - 1998 - Body and Society 4 (1):113-115.
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