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  1.  17
    Things that help out: designing smart wearables as partners in stress management.Xueliang Li, Marco C. Rozendaal, Kaspar Jansen, Catholijn Jonker & Eric Vermetten - 2021 - AI and Society 36 (1):251-261.
    We propose an approach to designing smart wearables that act as partners to help people cope with stress in daily life. Our approach contributes to the developing field of smart wearables by addressing how technological capabilities can be designed to establish partnerships that consider the person, the situation, and the appropriate type of support. As such, this study also contributes to healthcare by opening up novel technology-supported routes to stress treatment and care. We present the results of a phenomenological study (...)
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  2.  67
    Exploring sociality and engagement in play through game-control distribution.Marco C. Rozendaal, Bram A. L. Braat & Stephan A. G. Wensveen - 2010 - AI and Society 25 (2):193-201.
    This study explores how distributing the controls of a video game among multiple players affects the sociality and engagement experienced in game play. A video game was developed in which the distribution of game controls among the players could be varied, thereby affecting the abilities of the individual players to control the game. An experiment was set up in which eight groups of three players were asked to play the video game while the distribution of the game controls was increased (...)
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  3.  44
    Game feature and expertise effects on experienced richness, control and engagement in game play.Marco C. Rozendaal, David V. Keyson, Huib de Ridder & Peter O. Craig - 2009 - AI and Society 24 (2):123-133.
    The extent to which game play is experienced as engaging is an important criterion for the playability of video games. This study investigates how video games can be designed towards increased levels of experienced engagement over time. For this purpose, two experiments were conducted in which a total of 35 participants repeatedly played a video game. Results indicate that experienced engagement is based on the extent to which the game provides rich experiences as well as by the extent to which (...)
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