Results for 'Marc Larock'

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  1.  28
    Marc Chabot, Chroniques masculines. Coll. Indiscipline. Québec, Éditions Pantoute, 1981, 119 p.Marc Chabot, Chroniques masculines. Coll. Indiscipline. Québec, Éditions Pantoute, 1981, 119 p.Marc Turgeon - 1982 - Philosophiques 9 (2):344-347.
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  2. Filosofiska Smulor Tillägnade Konrad Marc-Wogau, 75 År 4 April 1977.Konrad Marc-Wogau, Ulla Carlstedt & Ann-Mari Henschen-Dahlquist - 1977 - Filosofiska Föreningen Och Filosofiska Institutionen Vid Uppsala Universitet.
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  3.  33
    Marshall M. Weinberg Conference: The Future of Cognitive Science - Friday Morning (Oct. 17, 2008) Session: Marc Hauser and Zenon Pylyshyn. [REVIEW]Marc Hauser & Zenon Pylyshyn - unknown
    Six leading experts speak about the future of cognitive science.
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  4.  40
    Les 'Méditations phénoménologiques' de Marc Richir.Jean-Marc Ghitti - 1999 - Revue Philosophique De Louvain 97 (3):581-605.
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  5. ""Baker, Steve Picturing the Beast: Animals, Identity, and Representation. Urbana: University of Illinois. Barresi, J. And Moore, C." Intentional Relations and Social Understanding." Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19: 107-154. Bekoff, Marc Minding Animals: Awareness, Emotions. And Heart, New York: Oxford University. [REVIEW]Marc Bekoff, Colin Allen, Gordon M. Burghardt, Ann B. Butler, Paul R. Manger & Peter Arhem - 2008 - In Susan J. Armstrong & Richard George Botzler (eds.), The Animal Ethics Reader. Routledge. pp. 143.
     
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  6. Nio Filosofiska Studier Tillägnade Konrad Marc-Wogau.Konrad Marc-Wogau - 1968 - Filosofiska Föreningen].
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  7.  4
    Interview: Cynthia Imogen Hammond and Marc Lafrance on Drawings for a Thicker Skin.Marc Lafrance & Cynthia Hammond - 2018 - Body and Society 24 (1-2):210-224.
    In this interview, Cynthia Hammond sits down with Marc Lafrance in order to discuss the 30-year sketching practice that led to her exhibition, Drawings for a Thicker Skin, in 2012. In this practice, Hammond made small, quick drawings of the clothes she would need for trips or key professional events. As she explains, the drawings were not just essential to knowing what to pack; they were essential to being able to pack. While she never conceived of the practice as (...)
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  8.  44
    Reply to My Critics: On Explanations by Constraint: Marc Lange: Because Without Cause: Non-Causal Explanation in Science and Mathematics. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017, Xxii+489pp, $74.00 HB.Marc Lange - 2017 - Metascience 27 (1):27-36.
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  9. Augustine on Time, Mind, and Personal Identity.Eric Larock - 2001 - Augustinus 46 (182-83):251-270.
    I argue that Augustine's concept of time implies that the continuity of temporal experience is not adequately explainable in physical terms and that persons (or at least a core component of persons) are enduring substances rather than perduring wholes composed of suitably related physical parts. In the latter part of the essay, I suggest that an enduring account of persons is in some important respects explanatorily better than some contemporary varieties of the perduring account of persons.
     
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  10. Counterfactuals All the Way Down?: Marc Lange: Laws and Lawmakers: Science, Metaphysics, and the Laws of Nature. New York: Oxford University Press, 2009, 280 Pp, $99 HB, $24.95 PB.Jim Woodward, Barry Loewer, John W. Carroll & Marc Lange - 2011 - Metascience 20 (1):27-52.
    Counterfactuals all the way down? Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s11016-010-9437-9 Authors Jim Woodward, History and Philosophy of Science, 1017 Cathedral of Learning, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260, USA Barry Loewer, Department of Philosophy, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08901, USA John W. Carroll, Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-8103, USA Marc Lange, Department of Philosophy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, CB#3125—Caldwell Hall, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3125, USA Journal Metascience (...)
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  11.  32
    Texte à plusieurs voix autour d'un livre ou les suites d'une table ronde sur Le Singulier de Marc Renault.Léon Charette, René Champagne, Robert Imlay & Marc Renault - 1983 - Philosophiques 10 (1):127-151.
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  12. Tiempo, mente e identidad personal, según Agustín.Eric LaRock & José Anoz - 2001 - Augustinus 46 (182-183):251-270.
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  13.  34
    Dualistic Interaction, Neural Dependence, and Aquinas’s Composite View.Eric F. Larock - 2001 - Philosophia Christi 3 (2):459-472.
    I explicate the Churchland's dualistic interaction and neural dependence objections to Cartesian dualism and argue that Aquinas’s conception of Aristotelian hylomorphism provides a way out of those objections. -/- .
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  14.  84
    Cognition and Consciousness: Kantian Affinities with Contemporary Vision Research.Eric Larock - 2010 - Kant Studien 101 (4):445-464.
    After providing a critique of Andreas Engel's neural mechanistic approach to object feature binding (OFB), I develop a Kantian approach to OFB that bears affinity with recent findings in cognitive psychology. I also address the diachronic object unity (DOU) problem and discuss the shortcomings of a purely neural mechanistic approach to this problem. Finally, I motivate a Kantian approach to DOU which suggests that DOU requires the persisting character of the cognizing subject. If plausible, the cognizing subject could make an (...)
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  15.  91
    Aristotle and Agent-Directed Neuroplasticity.Eric Larock - 2013 - International Philosophical Quarterly 53 (4):385-408.
    I propose an Aristotelian approach to agent causation that is consistent with the hypothesis of strong emergence. This approach motivates a wider ontology than materialism by maintaining (1) that the agent is generated by the brain without being reducible to it on grounds of the unity of experience and (2) that the agent possesses (formal) causal power to affect (i.e., mold, sculpt, or organize) the brain on grounds of agent-directed neuroplasticity. After providing recent empirical evidence for the strong emergence of (...)
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  16.  66
    Against the Functionalist Reading of Aristotle’s Philosophy of Perception and Emotion.Eric F. Larock - 2002 - International Philosophical Quarterly 42 (2):231-258.
    Examining the literature on Aristotelian psychology can leave one with the impression that his theory of perception and emotion is credible primarily because it accords with contemporary functionalism, a physicalist theory that has achieved orthodoxy in contemporary philosophy of mind. In my view, squeezing Aristotle into a functionalist mold is a mistake, for functionalism entaiIs at least two theses that Aristotle would reject: (1) that material types make no essential difference to perception and emotion (and to mental states in general), (...)
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  17.  85
    A Strong Emergence Hypothesis of Conscious Integration and Neural Rewiring.Eric LaRock, Jeffrey Schwartz, Iliyan Ivanov & David Carreon - 2020 - International Philosophical Quarterly 60 (1):97-115.
    In this paper we discuss the two-system framework, examine its strengths, point out a fundamental weakness concerning the unity of conscious experience, and then propose a new hypothesis that avoids that weakness and other related concerns. According to our strong emergence hypothesis, what emerges are not merely mental properties in specialized, distributed neural areas, but also a new, irreducibly singular entity that functions in a recurrent manner to integrate its mental properties and to rewire its brain. We argue that the (...)
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  18.  49
    An Empirical Case Against Central State Materialism.Eric LaRock - 2012 - Philosophia Christi 14 (2):409-428.
    I argue that recent empirical investigations reveal new problems and new evidence that should compel advocates of causal functionalism (of the sort defended by David Armstrong and David Lewis) to reconsider the feasibility of their account of mind.
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  19. Is Consciousness Really a Brain Process?Eric Larock - 2008 - International Philosophical Quarterly 48 (2):201-229.
    I argue on the basis of recent findings in neuroscience that consciousness is not a brain process, and then explore some alternative, non-reductive options concerning the metaphysical relationship between consciousness and the brain, such as weak and strong accounts of the emergence of consciousness and the constitution view of consciousness. I propose an Aristotelian account of the strong emergence of consciousness. This account motivates a wider ontology than reductive physicalism and makes reference to formal causation as a way explaining the (...)
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  20. How Subjects Can Emerge From Neurons.Eric LaRock & Mostyn Jones - 2019 - Process Studies 48 (1):40-58.
    We pose a foundational problem for those who claim that subjects are ontologically irreducible, but causally reducible (weak emergence). This problem is neuroscience’s notorious binding problem, which concerns how distributed neural areas produce unified mental objects (such as perceptions) and the unified subject that experiences them. Synchrony, synapses and other mechanisms cannot explain this. We argue that this problem seriously threatens popular claims that mental causality is reducible to neural causality. Weak emergence additionally raises evolutionary worries about how we’ve survived (...)
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  21.  55
    From Biological Naturalism to Emergent Subject Dualism.Eric LaRock - 2013 - Philosophia Christi 15 (1):97-118.
    I argue (1) that Searle's reductive stance about mental causation is unwarranted on evolutionary, logical, and neuroscientific grounds; and (2) that his theory of weak emergence, called biological naturalism, fails to provide a satisfactory account of objectual unity and subject unity. Finally I propose a stronger variety of emergence called emergent subject dualism (ESD) to fill the gaps in Searle's account, and support ESD on grounds of recent evidence in neuroscience. Hence I show how it is possible, if not also (...)
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  22. Cognition and Emotion: Aristotelian Affinities with Contemporary Emotion Research.Konstantinos Kafetsios & Eric LaRock - 2005 - Theory and Psychology 15 (5):639-657.
    We provide a critique of the usual functionalist, cognition-first reading of Aristotle’s theory of emotion and then offer an alternative understanding of Aristotle's theory of cognition and emotion that brings to bear certain biological considerations evidenced in his arguments on the integration of form and matter (hylomorphism) and the hierarchical organization of the biological world. This, of course, does not suggest that we are critical of all varieties of functionalism, but only those which fail to utilize and incorporate findings in (...)
     
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  23. E. J. Lowe's Metaphysics and Philosophical/Analytic Theology. Special Issue.Mihretu P. Guta & Eric LaRock - 2021 - TheoLogica: An International Journal for Philosophy of Religion and Philosophical Theology 5 (2):1-216.
    The essays in this special issue focus on connecting the relevant aspects of Lowe’s metaphysics to issues in philosophical theology. In this regard, the essays focus on Trinity, divine causal agency, atonement, embodied existence, physicalism vs. dualism, natural science, and theological claims.
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  24. Consciousness and the Self Without Reductionism: Touching Churchland's Nerve.Eric LaRock & Mostyn W. Jones - forthcoming - In Mihretu P. Guta & Scott Rae (eds.), Taking Persons Seriously: Where Philosophy and Bioethics Intersect. Eugene, OR, USA:
    Patricia Churchland's Touching a Nerve: The Self as Brain is her most recent wide-ranging argument for mind-to-brain reductionism. It's one of the leading anti-dualist works in neurophilosophy. It thus deserves careful attention by anti-reductionists. We survey the main arguments in this book for her thesis that the self is nothing but the brain. These arguments are based largely on the self's dependence upon neural activities as reflected in its various impairments, its unified experiences, and its powers of agency. We show (...)
     
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  25. Intrinsic Perspectives, Object Feature Binding, and Visual Consciousness.Eric LaRock - 2007 - Theory and Psychology 17 (6):799-09.
    I argue that Van der Velde and I agree on two fundamental issues surrounding the vision-related binding problem and recent solutions that have been offered: (1) that tagging theories fail to account for object feature binding in visual consciousness and (2) that feedforward-feedback processes in the visual cortical hierarchy play a role in generating a feature-unified object of visual consciousness. Van der Velde develops and discusses an important objection to tagging theories that could help to strengthen my critique of neuronal (...)
     
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  26. Hard Problems of Unified Experience From the Perspective of Neuroscience.Eric LaRock - 2019 - In Mihretu P. Guta (ed.), Consciousness and the Ontology of Properties. New York: Routledge. pp. 223-240.
    I examine several leading neuronal accounts of binding and conclude that, while those neuronal accounts might be necessary in some important senses (e.g., when it comes to error minimization), they fail to provide satisfying solutions to the hard problems of unified experience. I then present a new, testable hypothesis called emergent subject dualism to account for the unity of experience across modalities of the brain.
     
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  27. Saving Our Souls From Materialism.Eric LaRock & Robin Collins - 2016 - In Thomas M. Crisp (ed.), Neuroscience and the Soul. Grand Rapids, MI, USA: pp. 137-146.
    We refute three key claims against dualism: (1) the claim that dualism implies that we would not expect to observe such a radical causal dependence of our conscious lives on the physical world, which is what we do observe; (2) the claim that dualism implies mysteries beyond necessity, and hence that dualism is, theoretically speaking, less simple than physicalism; and (3) that dualism implies a metaphysical simple (e.g., a human soul) is incapable of undergoing a process of development. We conclude (...)
     
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  28.  49
    The Philosophical Implications of Awareness During General Anesthesia, In Consciousness, Awareness, and Anesthesia (Edited by George Mashour).Eric LaRock - 2010 - Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    Consciousness, Awareness, and Anesthesia is a multidisciplinary approach to both the scientific problem of consciousness and the clinical problem of awareness during general anesthesia.
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  29.  83
    Why Neural Synchrony Fails to Explain the Unity of Visual Consciousness.Eric LaRock - 2006 - Behavior and Philosophy 34:39-58.
    A central issue in philosophy and neuroscience is the problem of unified visual consciousness. This problem has arisen because we now know that an object's stimulus features (e.g., its color, texture, shape, etc.) generate activity in separate areas of the visual cortex (Felleman & Van Essen, 1991). For example, recent evidence indicates that there are very few, if any, neural connections between specific visual areas, such as those that correlate with color and motion (Bartels & Zeki, 2006; Zeki, 2003). So (...)
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  30. Disambiguation, Binding, and the Unity of Visual Consciousness.Eric LaRock - 2007 - Theory and Psychology 17 (6):747-77.
    Recent findings in neuroscience strongly suggest that an object’s features (e.g., its color, texture, shape, etc.) are represented in separate areas of the visual cortex. Although represented in separate neuronal areas, somehow the feature representations are brought together as a single, unified object of visual consciousness. This raises a question of binding: how do neural activities in separate areas of the visual cortex function to produce a feature-unified object of visual consciousness? Several prominent neuroscientists have adopted neural synchrony and attention-based (...)
     
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  31. Compassionate Reasoning.Marc Gopin - 2022 - New York, NY, United States of America: Oxford University Press.
    This book presents the case for Compassionate Reasoning as a moral and psychosocial skill for the positive transformation of individuals and societies. It has been developed from a reservoir of moral philosophical, cultural, and religious wisdom traditions over the centuries. These have been derived from a careful combination of classical schools of ethical thought that are artfully combined with compassion neuroscience, contemporary approaches to conflict resolution, public health methodologies, and positive psychological approaches to social change. There is an urgent need (...)
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  32.  13
    Self-Efficacy: Now You See It, Now You Don’T. Reply to Snoek.Marc Lewis - 2017 - Neuroethics 10 (1):195-197.
    Snoek, like other commentators, conflates some of my neural claims with those of the Brain Disease Model of Addiction. But she sees other details of my modeling with precision and depth. I welcome her emphasis on individual and developmental differences in addicts' capacity to recognize and deploy their personal agency. In fact we agree that belief in personal agency is a critical first step to cultivating it. Yet I wish to steer away from the disease nomenclature, to give that belief (...)
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  33.  12
    Searching for Norms to Violate. Reply to Henden & Gjelsvik.Marc Lewis - 2017 - Neuroethics 10 (1):79-81.
    Although I reject neuronormativity -- an idea central to the Brain Disease Model of Addiction -- Henden and Gjelsvik argue that the disease definition might refer to normativity in nonneural domains. They profess that a cognitive dysfunction, or a mismatch of evolutionary intentions, could also qualify as norm violations, thus legitimizing the disease label. The need for dividing lines is questioned as well. I rebut these criticisms in turn, but I must admit they are thought provoking.
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  34.  9
    Self-Organising Cognitive Appraisals.Marc D. Lewis - 1996 - Cognition and Emotion 10 (1):1-26.
  35.  13
    Self-Organizing Brains Don't Develop Gradually.Marc D. Lewis - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (1):47-47.
    Some dynamic systems approaches posit discontinuous changes, even universal stages, in development. Conversely, Thelen and colleagues see development as gradual because it relies on real-time interactions among many components. Yet their new model hinges on one parameter, neural cooperativity, that should change discontinuously because it engenders new skills that catalyze neural connectivity. In fact, research on cortical connectivity finds development to be discontinuous, and possibly stage-like, based on experience-dependent and experience-independent factors.
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  36.  21
    Resetting the Brain as Well as the Nomenclature. Reply to Szalavitz.Marc Lewis - 2017 - Neuroethics 10 (1):87-89.
    Szalavitz’s model and mine share a good many components. Foremost among them is the conviction that addiction is a developmental trajectory, not a disease. Szalavitz is correct that we should consider controlled substance use an acceptable outcome, though I would like her to shift her terminology away from the medical mainstream. Finally, I suggest that Szalavitz's important idea of a "reset" in brain development might best be addressed by the notion of kindling.
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  37.  7
    Once More, with Feeling! Reply to Ainslie.Marc Lewis - 2017 - Neuroethics 10 (1):155-156.
    Ainslie’s contribution offers a useful refinement of his powerful model of intertemporal bargaining. However, he focuses mostly on the cognitive mechanisms of choice. I suggest that these interact with emotional, personality, and developmental dynamics that cannot be ignored, either psychologically or neurally.
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  38.  29
    No Need for the Disease Label: Choice is Complicated. Reply to Heather.Marc Lewis - 2017 - Neuroethics 10 (1):125-127.
    Despite its historical contribution, Heather sees the Brain Disease Model of Addiction as failing to relieve stigma, increasing fatalism, and fundamentally wrong. He also sees “choice” as partly volitional and partly unconscious, implying no moral violation. I agree on all counts. Heather then presents a disorder-of-choice model of addiction, highlighting the failure of self-regulation with respect to immediate goals. Not only do I endorse such modeling, but the neural mechanisms I describe may help to explicate it more thoroughly.
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  39.  15
    Neurocentrism and Name-Calling: Let’s Agree to Agree. Reply to Satel & Lilienfeld.Marc Lewis - 2017 - Neuroethics 10 (1):25-27.
    Although these authors sometimes resort to medical terminology, we strongly agree that addiction is not a disease and that the Brain Disease Model of Addiction captures only one part of the story and distorts the big picture. Yet Satel and Lilienfeld continue to conflate a neurobiological model with a disease model. They also complain that my modeling of addiction reveals a hidden “neurocentric” bias, despite my integration of multiple levels of analysis, exactly as they recommend.
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  40.  21
    What Evolution Intended? Reply to Wakefield.Marc Lewis - 2017 - Neuroethics 10 (1):69-70.
    Wakefield doesn't mind my focus on parallels between addiction and love. But love can fall outside the bounds of what evolution intended. So, he claims, comparing addiction with love does not preclude a naturally defined "disorder." I counter with the argument that evolution handed us such highly general response systems, the bounds of normality cannot be defined.
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  41.  73
    Three Time Scales of Neural Self-Organization Underlying Basic and Nonbasic Emotions.Marc D. Lewis & Zhong-xu Liu - 2011 - Emotion Review 3 (4):416-423.
    Our model integrates the nativist assumption of prespecified neural structures underpinning basic emotions with the constructionist view that emotions are assembled from psychological constituents. From a dynamic systems perspective, the nervous system self-organizes in different ways at different time scales, in relation to functions served by emotions. At the evolutionary scale, brain parts and their connections are specified by selective pressures. At the scale of development, connectivity is revised through synaptic shaping. At the scale of real time, temporary networks of (...)
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  42.  13
    Yes, Precision is a Good Thing. Reply to Flanagan.Marc Lewis - 2017 - Neuroethics 10 (1):99-101.
    Flanagan asserts that my model of addiction would apply as well to sonnet writing. Yet his most interesting point is that “addiction” is an imprecise label for a cluster of distinct phenomena. I agree with him that we need to examine these distinctions, but that doesn’t negate their shared features. Neuroscience can play an important role in advancing our understanding of both commonalities and distinctions within the phenomena of addiction.
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  43.  49
    Marc Lange: Natural Laws in Scientific Practice. [REVIEW]Joshua Alexander - 2004 - Philosophy of Science 71 (2):222-224.
    What is a law of nature? Traditionally, philosophical discussion of this question has been dominated by two prominent alternatives; David Lewis’s best-systems analysis, according to which a law is a regularity that serves as a theorem in our best axiomatization of the facts about the world, and the Dretske-Armstrong-Tooley analysis, which incorporates universals to distinguish laws from mere accidental generalizations. Marc Lange’s first book presents a provocative alternative to this tradition, providing a novel treatment of natural laws that should (...)
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  44.  23
    Moral Minds: How Nature Designed Our Universal Sense of Right and Wrong.Marc Hauser - 2006 - Harper Collins.
    Marc Hauser puts forth the theory that humans have evolved a universal moral instinct, unconsciously propelling us to deliver judgments of right and wrong independent of gender, education, and religion. Combining his cutting-edge research with the latest findings in cognitive psychology, linguistics, neuroscience, evolutionary biology, economics, and anthropology, Hauser explores the startling implications of his provocative theory vis-à-vis contemporary bioethics, religion, the law, and our everyday lives.
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  45. Accounting for the Commandments in Medieval Judaism: Studies in Law, Philosophy, Pietism, and Kabbalah.Jeremy P. Brown & Marc Herman (eds.) - 2021 - Leiden ; Boston: Brill.
    Accounting for the Commandments in Medieval Judaism explores the discursive formation of the commandments as a generative matrix of Jewish thought and life in the posttalmudic period. Each study sheds light on how medieval Jews crafted the commandments out of theretofore underdetermined material. By systematizing, representing, or interrogating the amorphous category of commandment, medieval Jewish authors across both the Islamic and Christian spheres of influence sought to explain, justify, and characterize Israel's legal system, divine revelation, the cosmos, and even the (...)
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  46. Quiet Days in Burgundy: A Study of Local Politics.Marc Abélès - 2007 - Cambridge University Press.
    This ethnographic study of political life in the department of the Yonne, in the Burgundy region, explores a still richly Balzacian provincial world. The author, a French anthropologist, has extensive field experience in Ethiopia. Deploying the insights and methods of social anthropology by drawing on local history, interviews and participant observation, Abélès describes politicians at every level, from municipal officers to Members of Parliament and Ministers. He provides a clear picture of the process of 'decentralization' initiated by the Socialist government (...)
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  47. Anthropology at the French National Assembly : The Semiotic Aspects of a Political Institution.Marc Abélès - 2008 - In E. Neni K. Panourgia & George E. Marcus (eds.), Ethnographica Moralia: Experiments in Interpretive Anthropology. Fordham University Press.
     
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  48.  3
    Moral Minds: The Nature of Right and Wrong.Marc Hauser - 2007 - Harper Perrenial.
    In his groundbreaking book, Marc Hauser puts forth a revolutionary new theory: that humans have evolved a universal moral instinct, unconsciously propelling us to deliver judgments of right and wrong independent of gender, education, and religion. Combining his cutting-edge research with the latest findings in cognitive psychology, linguistics, neuroscience, evolutionary biology, economics, and anthropology, Hauser explores the startling implications of his provocative theory vis-à-vis contemporary bioethics, religion, the law, and our everyday lives.
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  49.  6
    Unrichtiges Recht: Gustav Radbruchs Rechtsphilosophische Parteienlehre.Marc André Wiegand - 2004 - Mohr Siebeck.
    English summary: Marc Andre Wiegand analyzes the neo-Kantian premises of Gustav Radbruch's legal philosophy.
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  50. Studies in Maimonides and His Interpreters.Marc B. Shapiro - 2008 - University of Scranton Press.
    More than 800 years after his death, the figure of Moses Maimonides—rabbi, philosopher, doctor, and communal leader—continues to fascinate. _Studies in Maimonides and His Interpreters_ unites the traditional rabbinic approach and the modern academic perspective to forge a new understanding of this iconic teacher._ _ This groundbreaking work by Marc B. Shapiro, which includes an essay on Maimonides’ approach to superstition in rabbinic literature and features three previously unpublished letters by Rabbi Joseph Kafih, will be essential reading for scholars (...)
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