Results for 'Marc F. Ereshefsky'

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  1. The Ontological Status of Species: A Study of Individuality and its Role in Evolutionary Theory.Marc F. Ereshefsky - 1988 - Dissertation, The University of Wisconsin - Madison
    Traditionally, species have been treated by biologists and philosophers as natural kinds. However, this conception of species has posed several problems for evolutionary theory. For example, biologists have been hard pressed to find traits had by all and only the members of a species. This has caused some philosophers to doubt that evolutionary theory is a scientific theory. ;In an effort to resolve such problems, Michael Ghiselin and David Hull have argued that species are not kinds but individuals. A number (...)
     
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  2.  55
    Specific Language Impairment: A Deficit in Grammar or Processing?Marc F. Joanisse & Mark S. Seidenberg - 1998 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 2 (7):240-247.
  3. Unsolvable Problems, Visual Imagery, and Explanatory Satisfaction.Marc F. Krellenstein - 1995 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 16 (3):235-54.
    It has been suggested that certain problems may be unsolvable because of the mind's cognitive structure, but we may wonder what problems, and exactly why. The ultimate origin of the universe and the mind-body problem seem to be two such problems. As to why, Colin McGinn has argued that the mind-body problem is unsolvable because any theoretical concepts about the brain will be observation-based and unable to connect to unobservable subjective experience. McGinn's argument suggests a requirement of imagability -- an (...)
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  4.  55
    Word Senses as Clusters of Meaning Modulations: A Computational Model of Polysemy.Jiangtian Li & Marc F. Joanisse - 2021 - Cognitive Science 45 (4):e12955.
    Most words in natural languages are polysemous; that is, they have related but different meanings in different contexts. This one‐to‐many mapping of form to meaning presents a challenge to understanding how word meanings are learned, represented, and processed. Previous work has focused on solutions in which multiple static semantic representations are linked to a single word form, which fails to capture important generalizations about how polysemous words are used; in particular, the graded nature of polysemous senses, and the flexibility and (...)
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  5.  15
    Rousseau’s State of Nature: An Interpretation of the Discourse on Inequality.Marc F. Plattner - 1979 - Northern Illinois University Press.
  6.  21
    Antoni Stepien and Epistemological Realism.Marc F. Griesbach - 1986 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 60:105.
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  7.  69
    What Have We Learned From Evolutionary Psychology?Marc F. Krellenstein - manuscript
    Evolutionary psychology claims biological inclinations for certain behaviors (e.g., a desire for more frequent sex and more sexual partners by males as compared to females), and the origin of these inclinations in natural selection. Jerry Fodor’s recent book, The Mind Doesn’t Work that Way (2000), grants the nativist case for such biological grounding but disputes the presumed certainty of its origin in natural selection. Nevertheless, there is today a consensus that at least some of the claims of evolutionary psychology are (...)
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  8.  20
    The Worth of Philosophy.Marc F. Griesbach - 1973 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 47:37.
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  9. Consciousness, Thought, and Neurological Integrity.Marc F. Krellenstein - 1995 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 16 (3):215-234.
     
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  10. Presidential Address: Restoring Philosophical Realism in Today's Intellectual World.Marc F. Griesbach - 1983 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 57:2.
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  11. Problem : The Judgment and Existence.Marc F. Griesbach - 1956 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 30:205.
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  12. Problem : The Analysts and the Nature of Philosophy.Marc F. Griesbach - 1960 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 34:210.
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  13. The Role of Philosophy in the Catholic Liberal College.Marc F. Griesbach - 1956 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 30:205-211.
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  14. What is It to Know?Marc F. Griesbach - 1965 - In Edward Dwyer Simmons (ed.), Essays on Knowledge and Methodology. Milwaukee, K. Cook Co.. pp. 15.
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  15.  25
    The Analysts and the Nature of Philosophy.Marc F. Griesbach - 1960 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 34:210-215.
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  16.  42
    The Dual-Mechanism Model of Inflectional Morphology: A Connectionist Critique.Marc F. Joanisse & Todd R. Haskell - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (6):1026-1027.
    Clahsen has added to the body of evidence that, on average, regular and irregular inflected words behave differently. However, the dual-mechanism account he supports predicts a crisp distinction; the empirical data instead suggest a fuzzy one, more in line with single-mechanism connectionist models.
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  17.  15
    The Judgment and Existence.Marc F. Griesbach - 1956 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 30:205-211.
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  18.  12
    The Epistemology of Paul Weiss.Marc F. Griesbach - 1972 - Review of Metaphysics 25 (Supplement):25 - 39.
    It may be that Kant manifested a profound understanding of modern empirical science in his observation that we have now placed nature on the witness stand and are compelling her to answer the questions we think fit to propose. This, I am convinced, is not the approach best suited to bring out the deepest insights and systematic teachings of another philosopher. On the contrary, it would seem that one can make sense out of another man's thought only by coming to (...)
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  19.  10
    In Memoriam.Marc F. Griesbach - 1978 - New Scholasticism 52 (3):453-455.
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  20.  6
    In Memoriam: Anton C. Pegis.Marc F. Griesbach - 1978 - New Scholasticism 52 (3):453-455.
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  21.  5
    Restoring Philosophical Realism in Today’s Intellectual World.Marc F. Griesbach - 1983 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 57:2-13.
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  22.  1
    Restoring Philosophical Realism in Today’s Intellectual World.Marc F. Griesbach - 1983 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 57:2-13.
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  23.  1
    The Analysts and the Nature of Philosophy.Marc F. Griesbach - 1960 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 34:210-215.
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  24.  1
    The Judgment and Existence.Marc F. Griesbach - 1956 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 30:205-211.
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  25.  49
    The Poverty of the Linnaean Hierarchy: A Philosophical Study of Biological Taxonomy.Marc Ereshefsky - 2000 - Cambridge University Press.
    The question of whether biologists should continue to use the Linnaean hierarchy has been a hotly debated issue. Invented before the introduction of evolutionary theory, Linnaeus's system of classifying organisms is based on outdated theoretical assumptions, and is thought to be unable to provide accurate biological classifications. Marc Ereshefsky argues that biologists should abandon the Linnaean system and adopt an alternative that is more in line with evolutionary theory. He traces the evolution of the Linnaean hierarchy from its (...)
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  26.  4
    Toward a New Philosophy of Biology.Marc Ereshefsky - 1990 - Philosophy of Science 57 (4):725-727.
  27. Scientific Kinds.Marc Ereshefsky & Thomas A. C. Reydon - 2015 - Philosophical Studies 172 (4):969-986.
    Richard Boyd’s Homeostatic Property Cluster Theory is becoming the received view of natural kinds in the philosophy of science. However, a problem with HPC Theory is that it neglects many kinds highlighted by scientific classifications while at the same time endorsing kinds rejected by science. In other words, there is a mismatch between HPC kinds and the kinds of science. An adequate account of natural kinds should accurately track the classifications of successful science. We offer an alternative account of natural (...)
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  28.  29
    Specific Phonological Impairments in Dyslexia Revealed by Eyetracking.Amy S. Desroches, Marc F. Joanisse & Erin K. Robertson - 2006 - Cognition 100 (3):B32-B42.
  29.  23
    Show Us the Model.Mark S. Seidenberg & Marc F. Joanisse - 2003 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (3):106-107.
  30. Eliminative Pluralism.Marc Ereshefsky - 1992 - Philosophy of Science 59 (4):671-690.
    This paper takes up the cause of species pluralism. An argument for species pluralism is provided and standard monist objections to pluralism are answered. A new form of species pluralism is developed and shown to be an improvement over previous forms. This paper also offers a general foundation on which to base a pluralistic approach to biological classification.
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  31. What's Wrong with the New Biological Essentialism.Marc Ereshefsky - 2010 - Philosophy of Science 77 (5):674-685.
    The received view in the philosophy of biology is that biological taxa (species and higher taxa) do not have essences. Recently, some philosophers (Boyd, Devitt, Griffiths, LaPorte, Okasha, and Wilson) have suggested new forms of biological essentialism. They argue that according to these new forms of essentialism, biological taxa do have essences. This article critically evaluates the new biological essentialism. This article’s thesis is that the costs of adopting the new biological essentialism are many, yet the benefits are none, so (...)
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  32.  77
    Species.Marc Ereshefsky - 2010 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  33. Species Pluralism and Anti-Realism.Marc Ereshefsky - 1998 - Philosophy of Science 65 (1):103-120.
    Species pluralism gives us reason to doubt the existence of the species category. The problem is not that species concepts are chosen according to our interests or that pluralism and the desire for hierarchical classifications are incompatible. The problem is that the various taxa we call 'species' lack a common unifying feature.
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  34.  20
    Defining 'Health' and 'Disease'.Marc Ereshefsky - 2009 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 40 (3):221-227.
    How should we define 'health' and 'disease'? There are three main positions in the literature. Naturalists desire value-free definitions based on scientific theories. Normativists believe that our uses of 'health' and 'disease' reflect value judgments. Hybrid theorists offer definitions containing both normativist and naturalist elements. This paper discusses the problems with these views and offers an alternative approach to the debate over 'health' and 'disease'. Instead of trying to find the correct definitions of 'health' and 'disease' we should explicitly talk (...)
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  35.  94
    Biological Individuality: The Case of Biofilms.Marc Ereshefsky & Makmiller Pedroso - 2013 - Biology and Philosophy 28 (2):331-349.
    This paper examines David Hull’s and Peter Godfrey-Smith’s accounts of biological individuality using the case of biofilms. Biofilms fail standard criteria for individuality, such as having reproductive bottlenecks and forming parent-offspring lineages. Nevertheless, biofilms are good candidates for individuals. The nature of biofilms shows that Godfrey-Smith’s account of individuality, with its reliance on reproduction, is too restrictive. Hull’s interactor notion of individuality better captures biofilms, and we argue that it offers a better account of biological individuality. However, Hull’s notion of (...)
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  36. Microbiology and the Species Problem.Marc Ereshefsky - 2010 - Biology and Philosophy 25 (4):553-568.
    This paper examines the species problem in microbiology and its implications for the species problem more generally. Given the different meanings of ‘species’ in microbiology, the use of ‘species’ in biology is more multifarious and problematic than commonly recognized. So much so, that recent work in microbial systematics casts doubt on the existence of a prokaryote species category in nature. It also casts doubt on the existence of a general species category for all of life (one that includes both prokaryotes (...)
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  37.  27
    Marc Ereshefsky, The Poverty of the Linnaean Hierarchy : A Philosophical Study of Biological Taxonomy, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2001, 328 pages.Marc Ereshefsky, The Poverty of the Linnaean Hierarchy : A Philosophical Study of Biological Taxonomy, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2001, 328 pages. [REVIEW]Véronica Ponce - 2004 - Philosophiques 31 (1):271-275.
  38. The Poverty of the Linnaean Hierarchy: A Philosophical Study of Biological Taxonomy.Marc Ereshefsky - 2001 - Journal of the History of Biology 34 (3):600-602.
     
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  39.  28
    Historicity and Explanation.Marc Ereshefsky & Derek Turner - 2020 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 80:47-55.
  40. Taxonomy, Polymorphism, and History: An Introduction to Population Structure Theory.Marc Ereshefsky & Mohan Matthen - 2005 - Philosophy of Science 72 (1):1-21.
    Homeostatic Property Cluster (HPC) theory suggests that species and other biological taxa consist of organisms that share certain similarities. HPC theory acknowledges the existence of Darwinian variation within biological taxa. The claim is that “homeostatic mechanisms” acting on the members of such taxa nonetheless ensure a significant cluster of similarities. The HPC theorist’s focus on individual similarities is inadequate to account for stable polymorphism within taxa, and fails properly to capture their historical nature. A better approach is to treat distributions (...)
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  41.  74
    Homology Thinking.Marc Ereshefsky - 2012 - Biology and Philosophy 27 (3):381-400.
    This paper explores an important type of biological explanation called ‘homology thinking.’ Homology thinking explains the properties of a homologue by citing the history of a homologue. Homology thinking is significant in several ways. First, it offers more detailed explanations of biological phenomena than corresponding analogy explanations. Second, it provides an important explanation of character similarity and difference. Third, homology thinking offers a promising account of multiple realizability in biology.
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  42.  44
    Natural Kinds, Mind Independence, and Defeasibility.Marc Ereshefsky - 2018 - Philosophy of Science 85 (5):845-856.
    A standard requirement on natural kinds is that they be mind independent. However, many kinds in the human and social sciences, even the natural sciences, depend on human thought. This article suggests that the mind independence requirement on natural kinds be replaced with the requirement that natural kind classifications be defeasible. The defeasibility requirement does not require that natural kinds be mind independent, so it does not exclude mind dependent scientific kinds from being natural kinds. Furthermore, the defeasibility requirement captures (...)
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  43. Species, Higher Taxa, and the Units of Evolution.Marc Ereshefsky - 1991 - Philosophy of Science 58 (1):84-101.
    A number of authors argue that while species are evolutionary units, individuals and real entities, higher taxa are not. I argue that drawing the divide between species and higher taxa along such lines has not been successful. Common conceptions of evolutionary units either include or exclude both types of taxa. Most species, like all higher taxa, are not individuals, but historical entities. Furthermore, higher taxa are neither more nor less real than species. None of this implies that there is no (...)
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  44. The Units of Evolution: Essays on the Nature of Species.Marc Ereshefsky - 1992 - Journal of the History of Biology 25 (3):500-501.
     
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  45. Darwin’s Solution to the Species Problem.Marc Ereshefsky - 2010 - Synthese 175 (3):405 - 425.
    Biologists and philosophers that debate the existence of the species category fall into two camps. Some believe that the species category does not exist and the term 'species' should be eliminated from biology. Others believe that with new biological insights or the application of philosophical ideas, we can be confident that the species category exists. This paper offers a different approach to the species problem. We should be skeptical of the species category, but not skeptical of the existence of those (...)
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  46.  45
    Rules Versus Statistics: Insights From a Highly Inflected Language.Jelena Mirković, Mark S. Seidenberg & Marc F. Joanisse - 2011 - Cognitive Science 35 (4):638-681.
    Inflectional morphology has been taken as a paradigmatic example of rule-governed grammatical knowledge (Pinker, 1999). The plausibility of this claim may be related to the fact that it is mainly based on studies of English, which has a very simple inflectional system. We examined the representation of inflectional morphology in Serbian, which encodes number, gender, and case for nouns. Linguists standardly characterize this system as a complex set of rules, with disagreements about their exact form. We present analyses of a (...)
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  47. Psychological Categories as Homologies: Lessons From Ethology.Marc Ereshefsky - 2007 - Biology and Philosophy 22 (5):659-674.
  48.  97
    Species, Historicity, and Path Dependency.Marc Ereshefsky - 2014 - Philosophy of Science 81 (5):714-726.
    This paper clarifies the historical nature of species by showing that species are path-dependent entities. A species’ identity is not determined by its intrinsic properties or its origin, but by its unique evolutionary path. Seeing that species are path-dependent entities has three implications: it shows that origin essentialism is mistaken, it rebuts two challenges to the species-are-historical-entities thesis, and it demonstrates that the identity of a species during speciation depends on future events.
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  49. Marc Ereshefsky, The Poverty of Linnaean Hierarchy. A Philosophical Study of Biological Taxonomy.M. Capocci - 2002 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 23 (2):303-303.
  50.  9
    Gene Drives: Dynamics and Regulatory Matters—A Report From the Workshop “Evaluation of Spatial and Temporal Control of Gene Drives,” April 4–5, 2019, Vienna. [REVIEW]Bernd Giese, Johannes L. Frieß, Nicholas H. Barton, Philipp W. Messer, Florence Débarre, Marc F. Schetelig, Nikolai Windbichler, Harald Meimberg & Christophe Boëte - 2019 - Bioessays 41 (11):1900151.
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