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  1. Why Corporations Are Not Morally Responsible for Anything They Do.Manuel G. Velasquez - 1983 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 2 (3):1-18.
    Properly speaking, the corporation, considered as an entity distinct from its members, cannot be morally responsible for wrongful corporate acts. Setting aside (in this abstract) acts brought about through negligence or omissions, we may say that moral responsibility for an act attaches to that agent (or agents) in whom the act "originates" in this sense: (1) the agent formed the (mental) intention or plan to bring about that act (possibly with the help of others) and (2) the act was intentionally (...)
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  2.  13
    Christian Religiosity and Corporate Community Involvement.Jinhua Cui, Hoje Jo & Manuel G. Velasquez - 2019 - Business Ethics Quarterly 29 (1):85-125.
    ABSTRACT:We examine whether religion influences company decisions related to corporate community involvement. Employing a large US sample, we show that the CCI initiatives of a company are positively associated with the level of Christian religiosity present in the region within which that company’s headquarters is located. This association persists even after we control for a wide range of firm characteristics and after we subject our results to several econometric tests. These results support our religious morality hypothesis which holds that companies (...)
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  3.  35
    The Influence of Christian Religiosity on Managerial Decisions Concerning the Environment.Jinhua Cui, Hoje Jo & Manuel G. Velasquez - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 132 (1):203-231.
    The issue of management’s relations to the environment has received a significant amount of attention in the literature on corporate social responsibility. Yet the influence of religion on managers’ environmental decisions has until now remained unexamined despite its known importance. In this article, we examine the empirical association between religion—primarily Christianity—and the environmental practices a firm’s management undertakes by investigating their OLS, principal component, simultaneous, and endogenous effects. Employing a large and extensive U.S. sample, we find a negative association between (...)
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  4.  33
    Community Religion, Employees, and the Social License to Operate.Jinhua Cui, Hoje Jo & Manuel G. Velasquez - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 136 (4):775-807.
    The World Bank recently noted: “Social license to operate has traditionally referred to the conduct of firms with regard to the impact on local communities and the environment, but the definition has expanded in recent years to include issues related to worker and human rights”. In this paper, we examine a factor that can influence the kind of work conditions that can facilitate or obstruct a firm’s attempts to achieve the social license to operate. Specifically, we examine the empirical association (...)
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  5.  41
    Workforce Diversity and Religiosity.Jinhua Cui, Hoje Jo, Haejung Na & Manuel G. Velasquez - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 128 (4):743-767.
    Workforce diversity has received increasing amounts of attention from academics and practitioners alike. In this article, we examine the empirical association between a firm’s workforce diversity and the degree of religiosity of the firm’s management by investigating their unidirectional and endogenous effects. Employing a large and extensive U.S. sample of firms from the years 1991–2010, we find a positive association between a measure of the firm’s commitment to diversity and the religiosity of the firm’s management after controlling for various firm (...)
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  6. The Ethics of Consumer Production.Manuel G. Velasquez - 2005 - In Fritz Allhoff & Anand Vaidya (eds.), Business Ethics. Sage Publications. pp. 3.
     
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  7. Abstract of “Why Corporations Are Not Morally Responsible for Anything They Do”.Manuel G. Velasquez - 1983 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 2 (4):99-99.
    Properly speaking, the corporation, considered as an entity distinct from its members, cannot be morally responsible for wrongful corporate acts. Setting aside (in this abstract) acts brought about through negligence or omissions, we may say that moral responsibility for an act attaches to that agent (or agents) in whom the act "originates" in this sense: (1) the agent formed the (mental) intention or plan to bring about that act (possibly with the help of others) and (2) the act was intentionally (...)
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  8.  24
    Some Lessons and Nonlessons of Casuist History.Manuel G. Velasquez - 1994 - The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:184-195.
  9.  21
    Abstract.Manuel G. Velasquez - 1984 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 3 (2):69-69.
    Properly speaking, the corporation, considered as an entity distinct from its members, cannot be morally responsible for wrongful corporate acts. Setting aside (in this abstract) acts brought about through negligence or omissions, we may say that moral responsibility for an act attaches to that agent (or agents) in whom the act "originates" in this sense: (1) the agent formed the (mental) intention or plan to bring about that act (possibly with the help of others) and (2) the act was intentionally (...)
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