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  1.  20
    Kant's Analogy Between the Moral Law and the Law of Nature.Manja Kisner - 2019 - Con-Textos Kantianos 9:137-153.
    In the Groundwork Kant refers to the analogy between the moral law and the law of nature when clarifying the concept of the categorical imperative. However, in the Groundwork itself, he does not give any further explanation as to why he introduces the analogy. Therefore, I take the Groundwork as a starting point of my article, but then I explicate on the analogy from a broader perspective, focusing especially on his lecture courses Moral Mrongovius II and Naturrecht Feyerabend as well (...)
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  2.  5
    The Concept of Will in Classical German Philosophy: Between Ethics, Politics, and Metaphysics.Manja Kisner & Jörg Noller (eds.) - 2020 - De Gruyter.
    This volume collects thirteen original essays that address the concept of will in Classical German Philosophy from Kant to Schopenhauer. During this short, but prolific period, the concept of will underwent various transformations. While Kant identifies the will with pure practical reason, Fichte introduces, in the wake of Reinhold, an originally biological concept of drive into his ethical theory, thereby expanding on the Kantian notion of the will. Schelling, Hegel, and Schopenhauer take a step further and conceive the will either (...)
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  3.  4
    The Concept of Drive in Classical German Philosophy: Between Biology, Anthropology, and Metaphysics.Manja Kisner & Jörg Noller (eds.) - 2021 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    This volume gathers a collection of fourteen original articles discussing the concept of drive in classical German philosophy. Its aim is to offer a comprehensive historical overview of the concept of drive at the turn of the 19th century and to discuss it both historically and systematically. From the 18th century onward, the concept of drive started to play an important role in emerging disciplines such as biology, anthropology, and psychology. In these fields, the concept of drive was used to (...)
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  4.  3
    On the Difference Between Kant’s Intellectual Intuition and Intuitive Understanding in the First Critique.Manja Kisner - 2021 - In Camilla Serck-Hanssen & Beatrix Himmelmann (eds.), The Court of Reason: Proceedings of the 13th International Kant Congress. De Gruyter. pp. 555-564.
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  5.  3
    Drive and Will in Fichte’s System of Ethics.Manja Kisner - 2020 - In Manja Kisner & Jörg Noller (eds.), The Concept of Will in Classical German Philosophy: Between Ethics, Politics, and Metaphysics. De Gruyter. pp. 139-158.
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  6.  1
    Introduction.Manja Kisner & Jörg Noller - 2020 - In Manja Kisner & Jörg Noller (eds.), The Concept of Will in Classical German Philosophy: Between Ethics, Politics, and Metaphysics. De Gruyter. pp. 1-4.
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  7.  1
    Introduction.Manja Kisner & Jörg Noller - 2021 - In Manja Kisner & Jörg Noller (eds.), The Concept of Drive in Classical German Philosophy: Between Biology, Anthropology, and Metaphysics. Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 1-9.
    The introduction to the volume situates the concept of drive in the history of classical German philosophy and in the history of biology. It outlines the recent state of research and provides an overview of the contributions.
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  8.  1
    Kant on Driving Forces: Parallels and Differences in Kant’s Conceptualization of Trieb and Triebfeder.Manja Kisner - 2021 - In Manja Kisner & Jörg Noller (eds.), The Concept of Drive in Classical German Philosophy: Between Biology, Anthropology, and Metaphysics. Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 127-148.
    The concept of Triebfeder, commonly translated into English as “incentive,” plays a crucial role in Kant’s moral philosophy. In the Critique of Practical Reason, in which a whole chapter is dedicated to the Triebfedern of pure practical reason, Kant argues that the moral law is not only the objective determining ground of the will but also functions as a Triebfeder, that is, as a subjective determining ground of the will. Kant’s concept of Trieb, by contrast, is much less clearly defined, (...)
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