Results for 'Maisie Knew'

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  1.  20
    What Maisie Knew: Moral Imagination and Two Conceptions of Moral Thought.Craig Taylor - 2017 - SATS 18 (2):141-157.
    According to a widely held view, moral thought essentially involves the survey of an array of independently specifiable morally relevant facts, on the basis of which an agent is to reach a judgment about how anybody in that situation ought to act. I argue, drawing on Henry James’s.
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  2. What Maisie Knew: Moral Imagination and Two Conceptions of Moral Thought.Arts Craig TaylorCorresponding authorCollege of Humanities - 2017 - SATS 18 (2).
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  3. What Maisie Knew in What Maisie Knew.Victor Gerald Rivas Lopez - 2011 - Analecta Husserliana 109:43-69.
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  4.  40
    Noël Carroll.Maisie Knew - 2008 - In Paisley Livingston & Carl R. Plantinga (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Philosophy and Film. Routledge. pp. 196.
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  5.  2
    The Regime of the Brother: After the Patriarchy.Juliet Flower MacCannell - 1991 - Routledge.
    The Regime of the Brother is one of the first attempts to challenge modernity on its own terms. Using the work of Lacan, Kristeva and Freud, Juliet MacCannell confronts the failure of modernity to bring about the social equality promised by the Enlightenment. On the verge of its destruction, the Patriarchy has reshaped itself into a new, and often more oppressive regime: that of the Brother. Examining a range of literary and social texts - from Rousseau's Confessions to Richardson's Clarissa (...)
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  6. The Regime of the Brother: After the Patriarchy.Juliet Flower MacCannell - 1991 - Routledge.
    _The Regime of the Brother_ is one of the first attempts to challenge modernity on its own terms. Using the work of Lacan, Kristeva and Freud, Juliet MacCannell confronts the failure of modernity to bring about the social equality promised by the Enlightenment. On the verge of its destruction, the Patriarchy has reshaped itself into a new, and often more oppressive regime: that of the Brother. Examining a range of literary and social texts - from Rousseau's _Confessions_ to Richardson's _Clarissa_ (...)
     
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  7.  97
    Who Knew?: Responsiblity Without Awareness.George Sher - 2009 - Oxford University Press USA.
    To be responsible for their acts, agents must both perform those acts voluntarily and in some sense know what they are doing. Of these requirements, the voluntariness condition has been much discussed, but the epistemic condition has received far less attention. In Who Knew? George Sher seeks to rectify that imbalance. The book is divided in two halves, the first of which criticizes a popular but inadequate way of understanding the epistemic condition, while the second seeks to develop a (...)
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  8.  22
    "Frank & Maisie," by Wilfrid Sheed. [REVIEW]James M. Purcell - 1986 - The Chesterton Review 12 (3):364-369.
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  9.  35
    Peirce Knew Why Abduction Isn’T IBE—A Scheme and Critical Questions for Abductive Argument.Shiyang Yu & Frank Zenker - 2017 - Argumentation 32 (4):569-587.
    Whether abduction is treated as an argument or as an inference, the mainstream view presupposes a tight connection between abduction and inference to the best explanation. This paper critically evaluates this link and supports a narrower view on abduction. Our main thesis is that merely the hypothesis-generative aspect, but not the evaluative aspect, is properly abductive in the sense introduced by C. S. Peirce. We show why equating abduction with IBE unnecessarily complicates argument evaluation by levelling the status of abduction (...)
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  10.  83
    Chesterton's Prophecy About Poland.Maisie Ward - 2007 - The Chesterton Review 33 (1-2):262-267.
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  11.  53
    The Eve of the War.Maisie Ward - 2011 - The Chesterton Review 37 (3/4):397-398.
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  12.  38
    Chesterton and Wilfrid Ward.Maisie Ward - 2004 - The Chesterton Review 30 (3/4):421-431.
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  13.  33
    The Influence of Chesterton's Distributist Ideas on Various Movements of Social Reform Around the World.Maisie Ward - 1993 - The Chesterton Review 19 (2):247-251.
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  14.  34
    About Father Vincent McNabb.Maisie Ward - 1996 - The Chesterton Review 22 (1/2):233-234.
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  15.  20
    St. Margaret of Cortona. By François Mauriac.Maisie Ward - 1949 - Renascence 1 (2):61-63.
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  16. We Knew That’s It: Retelling the Turning Point of a Narrative.Deborah Schiffrin - 2003 - Discourse Studies 5 (4):535-561.
    A paradigmatic means of conveying a turningpoint in a narrativeof danger is the line ‘we knew that’s it’. In four tellings of a single narrative about danger during the Holocaust, anarrator varies this line in ways that maintain its collective focus on knowledge, but alter what is ‘known’. An analysis of changes in the ‘we knew [x]’ line reveals its relationship with the changingstructure of the narrative and with the shift toward multi-vocalic means ofexternal evaluation. Also suggested is (...)
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  17.  38
    France Pagan? By Maisie Ward.S. W. Cassidy - 1949 - Renascence 2 (1):70-71.
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  18.  13
    Frank Sheed and Maisie Ward.John T. Ford C. S. C. - 2011 - Newman Studies Journal 8 (1):94-97.
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  19.  55
    Frank Sheed & Maisie Ward, Spiritual Writings, Selected Introduction by David Meconi, S.J.Joseph Pearce - 2011 - The Chesterton Review 37 (1/2):148-152.
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  20. I Knew I Shouldn’T Do It; But I Did It: Davidson on Causal Strength and Weakness of Will.Rafael Martins - 2019 - Investigação Filosófica 10 (2):05-20.
    Reasons for action is a widely employed methodology in practical philosophy, and especially in moral philosophy. Reasons are facts that explain and justify actions. But, conceptually, if reasons were causes, incontinent actions would be impossible. When an agent ranks an evaluation about what to do as his best judgement, it entails that he has a reason for acting as that judgement prescribes. But when an agent acts incontinently, he acts in accordance to an intention that is not aligned with his (...)
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  21. The Bayesian Who Knew Too Much.Yann Benétreau-Dupin - 2015 - Synthese 192 (5):1527-1542.
    In several papers, John Norton has argued that Bayesianism cannot handle ignorance adequately due to its inability to distinguish between neutral and disconfirming evidence. He argued that this inability sows confusion in, e.g., anthropic reasoning in cosmology or the Doomsday argument, by allowing one to draw unwarranted conclusions from a lack of knowledge. Norton has suggested criteria for a candidate for representation of neutral support. Imprecise credences (families of credal probability functions) constitute a Bayesian-friendly framework that allows us to avoid (...)
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  22.  35
    ‘I Knew Jean-Paul Sartre’: Philosophy of Education as Comedy.Morwenna Griffiths & Michael A. Peters - 2014 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 46 (2):1-16.
    Ludwig Wittgenstein suggests that ?A serious and good philosophical work could be written consisting entirely of jokes?. The idea for this dialogue comes from a conversation that Michael Peters and Morwenna Griffiths had at the Philosophy of Education of Great Britain annual meeting at the University of Oxford, 2011. It was sparked by an account of an assessment of a piece of work where one of the external examiners unexpectedly exclaimed ?I knew Jean-Paul Sartre?, trying to trump the discussion. (...)
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  23. Who Knew? Responsibility Without Awareness.Angela M. Smith - 2010 - Social Theory and Practice 36 (3):515-524.
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  24.  8
    What I Wish You Knew: Insights on Burnout, Inertia, Meltdown, and Shutdown From Autistic Youth.Jasmine Phung, Melanie Penner, Clémentine Pirlot & Christie Welch - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    Introduction: Burnout, inertia, meltdown, and shutdown have been identified as important parts of some autistic people’s lives. This study builds on our previous work that offered early academic descriptions of these phenomena, based on the perspectives of autistic adults.Objectives: This study aimed to explore the unique knowledge and insights of eight autistic children and youth to extend and refine our earlier description of burnout, inertia, and meltdown, with additional exploration of shutdown. We also aimed to explore how these youth cope (...)
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  25. We Knew Jesus: A Series of Lenten Messages.John Calvin Reid - 1954
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  26. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2010, X+ 307 Pp., Pb. $24.95. Care Crosses the River, Hans Blumenberg. Translated From German by Paul Fleming. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2010, X+ 157 Pp., Pb. $21.95. Emotion and Psyche, Mark Jackson. Ropley: O-Books, 2010, 72 Pp., Pb. [REVIEW]Everything You Thought You Knew - 2011 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 54 (1):110-111.
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  27.  19
    "I Knew Him by His Voice": Can Animals Be Our Friends?Stephen R. L. Clark - 2008 - Philosophy Now 67:13-16.
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  28. The Being That Knew Too Much.Patrick Grim - 2000 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 47 (3):141-154.
    John Abbruzzese has recently attempted a defense of omniscience against a series of my attacks. This affords me a welcome occasion to clarify some of the arguments, to pursue some neglected subtleties, and to re-think some important complications. In the end, however, I must insist that at least three of four crucial arguments really do show an omniscient being to be impossible. Abbruzzese sometimes misunderstands the forms of the argument themselves, and quite generally misunderstands their force.
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  29.  28
    ‘She Knew What Was Expected of Her’: The White Legal System’s Encounter with Traditional Marriage.Heather Douglas - 2005 - Feminist Legal Studies 13 (2):181-203.
    A recent case in the Northern Territory of Australia has raised the issues of intra-racial rape and the legal recognition of traditional marriages between Indigenous people. The defendant in the Jamilmira case was charged with statutory rape of a 15-year-old girl. He argued that the girl’s status as his promised wife should lead to mitigation of his sentence. Members of the Northern Territory judiciary and others in the community were divided in their response to his claim. Ultimately the case led (...)
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  30.  20
    Who Knew? Responsibility Without Awareness, by George Sher.Bruce N. Waller - 2014 - Mind 123 (490):639-644.
  31. 10. George Sher, Who Knew? Responsibility Without Awareness George Sher, Who Knew? Responsibility Without Awareness (Pp. 675-680). [REVIEW]Debbie Roberts, Tom Dougherty, Ian Carter, Anna Stilz & David Shoemaker - 2011 - Ethics 121 (3).
     
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  32. The Folk Strike Back; or, Why You Didn’T Do It Intentionally, Though It Was Bad and You Knew It.Mark T. Phelan & Hagop Sarkissian - 2008 - Philosophical Studies 138 (2):291 - 298.
    Recent and puzzling experimental results suggest that people’s judgments as to whether or not an action was performed intentionally are sensitive to moral considerations. In this paper, we outline these results and evaluate two accounts which purport to explain them. We then describe a recent experiment that allegedly vindicates one of these accounts and present our own findings to show that it fails to do so. Finally, we present additional data suggesting no such vindication could be in the offing and (...)
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  33.  15
    Who Knows What Mary Knew? An Experimental Study.Daniel Gregory, Malte Hendrickx & Cameron Turner - 2022 - Philosophical Psychology 35 (4):522-545.
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  34.  82
    If Jones Only Knew More!Isaac Levi - 1969 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 20 (2):153-159.
  35.  16
    The Women Who Knew Too Much, Hitchcock and Feminist Theory.Verena Andermatt Conley & Tania Modleski - 1989 - Substance 18 (2):122.
  36. How to Use Cognitive Faculties You Never Knew You Had.Andrew Moon - 2018 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 99 (S1):251-275.
    Norman forms the belief that the president is in New York by way of a clairvoyance faculty he doesn’t know he has. Many agree that his belief is unjustified but disagree about why it is unjustified. I argue that the lack of justification cannot be explained by a higher-level evidence requirement on justification, but it can be explained by a no-defeater requirement. I then explain how you can use cognitive faculties you don’t know you have. Lastly, I use lessons from (...)
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  37. Finding the Good in Grief: What Augustine Knew but Meursault Couldn't.Michael Cholbi - 2017 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 3 (1):91-105.
    Meursault, the protagonist of Camus' The Stranger, is unable to grieve, a fact that ultimately leads to his condemnation and execution. Given the emotional distresses involved in grief, should we envy Camus or pity him? I defend the latter conclusion. As St. Augustine seemed to dimly recognize, the pains of grief are integral to the process of bereavement, a process that both motivates and provides a distinctive opportunity to attain the good of self-knowledge.
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  38. What Our Rylean Ancestors Knew: More on Knowing How and Knowing That.Joseph Shieber - 2003 - Austrian Ludwig Wittgenstein Society 11:328-330.
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  39.  4
    The Man Who Knew Too Much.Lawrence Cahoone - 2022 - Contemporary Pragmatism 19 (2):81-84.
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  40.  32
    Concealed with a Kiss: A Review of The Living of Maisie Ward by Dana Greene. [REVIEW]Joseph Pearce - 2000 - The Chesterton Review 26 (3):335-341.
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  41.  46
    “I Lived and Knew Myself”: Self-Knowledge in Till We Have Faces.Sharon Jebb - 2011 - Renascence 63 (2):111-129.
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  42. Women Who Knew Paul.Florence M. Gillman - 1992
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  43. By Those Who Knew Them: French Modernists Left, Right and Centre, by Harvey Hill, Louis-Pierre Sardella, and C. J. T. Talar. [REVIEW]Brian Sudlow - 2009 - The Chesterton Review 35 (3/4):681-683.
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  44.  39
    Sher , George . Who Knew? Responsibility Without Awareness .New York: Oxford University Press, 2009. Pp. 168. $99.00 (Cloth); $24.95 (Paper). [REVIEW]Dana Kay Nelkin - 2011 - Ethics 121 (3):675-680.
  45.  34
    Simone Weil as We Knew Her.Joseph Marie Perrin - 2003 - Routledge.
    In 1941 Simone Weil was introduced to Father Jean-Marie Perrin, a priest of the Dominican order whose friendship became one of the most significant influences on her spiritual development. It was for Father Perrin that she wrote her 'spiritual autobiography', contained in Waiting for God, and to him that she later wrote 'Letter to a Priest'. When Weil requested work as a field hand, Perrin sent her to Gustave Thibon, a farmer and Christian philosopher. From 1941-2, Weil stayed with the (...)
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  46.  30
    What Newman Knew: A Walk on the Postmodernist Side.Walter Jost - 1997 - Renascence 49 (4):241-260.
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  47.  48
    ‘What Strether Knew’: ‘The Novel’ as Art Form.Olga McDonald Meidner - 1993 - British Journal of Aesthetics 33 (2):152-161.
  48.  31
    What Penelope Knew: Doubt and Scepticism in the Odyssey.Michelle Zerba - 2009 - Classical Quarterly 59 (2):295-.
  49.  14
    Isaiah Berlin as I Knew Him.Andrzej Walicki - 2005 - Dialogue and Universalism 15 (9-10):5-50.
  50.  35
    What Socrates Knew.Daniel W. Graham - 1997 - Apeiron 30 (4):25 - 36.
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