6 found
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  1.  21
    The ECOUTER Methodology for Stakeholder Engagement in Translational Research.Madeleine J. Murtagh, Joel T. Minion, Andrew Turner, Rebecca C. Wilson, Mwenza Blell, Cynthia Ochieng, Barnaby Murtagh, Stephanie Roberts, Oliver W. Butters & Paul R. Burton - 2017 - BMC Medical Ethics 18 (1):24.
    Because no single person or group holds knowledge about all aspects of research, mechanisms are needed to support knowledge exchange and engagement. Expertise in the research setting necessarily includes scientific and methodological expertise, but also expertise gained through the experience of participating in research and/or being a recipient of research outcomes. Engagement is, by its nature, reciprocal and relational: the process of engaging research participants, patients, citizens and others brings them closer to the research but also brings the research closer (...)
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  2.  32
    Clinical Research Without Consent in Adults in the Emergency Setting: A Review of Patient and Public Views. [REVIEW]Jan Lecouturier, Helen Rodgers, Gary A. Ford, Tim Rapley, Lynne Stobbart, Stephen J. Louw & Madeleine J. Murtagh - 2008 - BMC Medical Ethics 9 (1):9.
    In emergency research, obtaining informed consent can be problematic. Research to develop and improve treatments for patients admitted to hospital with life-threatening and debilitating conditions is much needed yet the issue of research without consent (RWC) raises concerns about unethical practices and the loss of individual autonomy. Consistent with the policy and practice turn towards greater patient and public involvement in health care decisions, in the US, Canada and EU, guidelines and legislation implemented to protect patients and facilitate acute research (...)
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  3.  18
    Biobank Economics and the “Commercialization Problem”.Andrew Turner, Clara Dallaire-Fortier & Madeleine J. Murtagh - 2013 - Spontaneous Generations 7 (1):69-80.
    The economic aspects of biobanking are intertwined with the social and scientific aspects. We describe two problems that structure the discussion about the economics of biobanking and which illustrate this intertwining. First, there is a ‘sustainability problem’ about how to maintain biobanks in the long term. Second, and representing a partial response to the first problem, there is a ‘commercialisation problem’ about how to deal with the voluntary altruistic relationship between participants and biobanks, and the potential commercial relationships that a (...)
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  4. Economic Aspects of Biobanking.Andrew Turner, Clara Dallaire-Fortier & Madeleine J. Murtagh - 2013 - Spontaneous Generations 7 (1):69-80.
     
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  5.  16
    The Challenges of Seeking Consent From Adults to Participate in Acute Research Studies.Jan Lecouturier, Lynne Stobbart, Madeleine J. Murtagh, Gary A. Ford, Tim Rapley, Stephen J. Louw & Helen Rodgers - 2010 - Clinical Ethics 5 (2):73-76.
    In this paper the current legislative landscape and the challenges researchers face in obtaining informed consent in acute situations are explored. In such situations, some current guidelines can be difficult or impossible to apply. Capacity should be formally assessed before consent is sought to ensure that vulnerable persons are neither inappropriately recruited to a study nor denied the opportunity to participate. However, there is little guidance in current legislation as to how this should be achieved. When the patient is considered (...)
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  6.  3
    What Does Engagement Mean to Participants in Longitudinal Cohort Studies? A Qualitative Study.Madeleine J. Murtagh, Mwenza Blell, Andrew Turner, Joel T. Minion & Cynthia A. Ochieng - 2021 - BMC Medical Ethics 22 (1):1-15.
    BackgroundEngagement is important within cohort studies for a number of reasons. It is argued that engaging participants within the studies they are involved in may promote their recruitment and retention within the studies. Participant input can also improve study designs, make them more acceptable for uptake by participants and aid in contextualising research communication to participants. Ultimately it is also argued that engagement needs to provide an avenue for participants to feedback to the cohort study and that this is an (...)
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