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Michaelis Michael [32]Mike Michael [25]Mark A. Michael [17]Mark Michael [10]
Michael Michael [5]M. Michael [4]Michael L. Michael [2]M. A. Michael [2]

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  1. Compatibilist Semantics in Metaphysics: A Case Study.John O'Leary-Hawthorne & Michaelis Michael - 1996 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 74 (1):117 – 134.
    (1996). Compatibilist semantics in metaphysics: A case study. Australasian Journal of Philosophy: Vol. 74, No. 1, pp. 117-134. doi: 10.1080/00048409612347101.
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  2. Implicit Ontological Commitment.Michaelis Michael - 2008 - Philosophical Studies 141 (1):43 - 61.
    Quine’s general approach is to treat ontology as a matter of what a theory says there is. This turns ontology into a question of which existential statements are consequences of that theory. This approach is contrasted favourably with the view that takes ontological commitment as a relation to things. However within the broadly Quinean approach we can distinguish different accounts, differing as to the nature of the consequence relation best suited for determining those consequences. It is suggested that Quine’s own (...)
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  3.  38
    On a “Most Telling” Argument for Paraconsistent Logic.Michaelis Michael - 2016 - Synthese 193 (10).
    Priest and others have presented their “most telling” argument for paraconsistent logic: that only paraconsistent logics allow non-trivial inconsistent theories. This is a very prevalent argument; occurring as it does in the work of many relevant and more generally paraconsistent logicians. However this argument can be shown to be unsuccessful. There is a crucial ambiguity in the notion of non-triviality. Disambiguated the most telling reason for paraconsistent logics is either question-begging or mistaken. This highlights an important confusion about the role (...)
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  4. Business Ethics: The Law of Rules.Michael L. Michael - 2006 - Business Ethics Quarterly 16 (4):475-504.
    Abstract: Despite the recent rash of corporate scandals and the resulting rush to address the problem by adding more laws and regulations, seemingly little attention has been paid to how the nature (not the substance) of rules may or may not affect ethical decision-making. Drawing on work in law, ethics, management, psychology, and other social sciences, this article explores how several characteristics of rules may interfere with the process of reaching and implementing ethical decisions. Such a relationship would have practical (...)
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  5. Time Travel for Endurantists.Markos Valaris & Michaelis Michael - 2015 - American Philosophical Quarterly 52 (4):357-364.
    Famously, David Lewis argued that we can avoid the apparent paradoxes of time travel by introducing a notion of personal time, which by and large follows the causal flow of the time traveler's life history. This paper argues that a related approach can be adapted for use by three-dimensionalists in response to Ted Sider's claim that three-dimensionalism is inconsistent with time travel. In contrast to Lewis (and others who follow him on this point), however, this paper argues that the order (...)
     
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  6.  15
    Is Nonanthropocentrism Anti-Democratic?Mark Alan Michael - 2020 - Environmental Values 29 (1):9-28.
    Environmental pragmatists such as Ben Minteer and Bryan Norton have argued that there is an anti-democratic strain to be found in the work of some nonanthropocentrists. I examine three possible sources of the pragmatists' concern: the claim that nonanthropocentrists know the political truth, the claim that those who disagree with their basic principle should be excluded from discussions of policy and the claim that their basic principle is self-evident. I argue here that none of these claims are objectionably anti-democratic when (...)
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  7. Roadkill: Between Humans, Nonhuman Animals, and Technologies.Mike Michael - 2004 - Society and Animals 12 (4):277-298.
    This paper has two broad objectives. First, the paper aims to treat roadkill as a topic of serious social scientific inquiry by addressing it as a cultural artifact through which various identities are played out. Thus, the paper shows how the idea of roadkill-as-food mediates contradictions and ironies in American identities concerned with hunting, technology, and relationships to nature. At a second, more abstract, level, the paper deploys the example of roadkill to suggest a par ticular approach to theorizing broader (...)
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  8. “What Are We Busy Doing?”: Engaging the Idiot.Mike Michael - 2012 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 37 (5):528-554.
    Engagement events—whether interviews, installations, or participatory encounters—can entail a range of happenings which, in one way or another, “overspill” the empirical, analytic, or political framing of those engagement events. This article looks at how we might attend to these overspills—for instance, forms of “misbehavior” on the part of lay participants—not only to provide accounts of them but also to explore ways of deploying them creatively. In particular, Stengers’ figure of the “idiot” is proposed as a device for deploying those overspills (...)
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  9.  56
    Information and Veridicality: Information Processing and the Bar-Hillel/Carnap Paradox.Nir Fresco & Michaelis Michael - 2016 - Philosophy of Science 83 (1):131-151.
    Floridi’s Theory of Strongly Semantic Information posits the Veridicality Thesis. One motivation is that it can serve as a foundation for information-based epistemology being an alternative to the tripartite theory of knowledge. However, the Veridicality thesis is false, if ‘information’ is to play an explanatory role in human cognition. Another motivation is avoiding the so-called Bar-Hillel/Carnap paradox. But this paradox only seems paradoxical, if ‘information’ and ‘informativeness’ are synonymous, logic is a theory of inference, or validity suffices for rational inference; (...)
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  10.  2
    Medicine: Experimentation, Politics, Emergent Bodies.Marsha Rosengarten & Mike Michael - 2012 - Body and Society 18 (3-4):1-17.
    In this introduction, we address some of the complexities associated with the emergence of medicine’s bodies, not least as a means to ‘working with the body’ rather than simply producing a critique of medicine. We provide a brief review of some of the recent discussions on how to conceive of medicine and its bodies, noting the increasing attention now given to medicine as a technology or series of technologies active in constituting a multiplicity of entities – bodies, diseases, experimental objects, (...)
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  11.  9
    Business Ethics: The Law of Rules.Michael L. Michael - 2006 - Business Ethics Quarterly 16 (4):475-504.
    Despite the recent rash of corporate scandals and the resulting rush to address the problem by adding more laws and regulations,seemingly little attention has been paid to how the nature of rules may or may not affect ethical decision-making.Drawing on work in law, ethics, management, psychology, and other social sciences, this article explores how several characteristics of rules may interfere with the process of reaching and implementing ethical decisions. Such a relationship would have practical implications for regulatory policy and managers (...)
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  12. The Heart of the Matter: Animal Bodies, Ethics, and Species Boundaries.Lynda Birke & Mike Michael - 1998 - Society and Animals 6 (3):245-261.
    This article addresses some of the ways in which the development of xenotransplantation, the use of nonhuman animals as organ donors, are presented in media accounts. Although xenotransplantation raises many ethical and philosophical questions, media coverage typically minimizes these. At issue are widespread public concerns about the transgression of species boundaries, particularly those between humans and other animals. We consider how these are constructed in media narratives, and how those narratives, in turn, rely on particular scientific discourses that posit species (...)
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  13.  28
    Oceans of Need in the Desert: Ethical Issues Identified While Researching Humanitarian Agency Response in Afghanistan.Markus Michael & Anthony B. Zwi - 2002 - Developing World Bioethics 2 (2):109–130.
    This paper describes the interventions by the International Committee of the Red Cross to support a hospital in Afghanistan during the mid 1990s. We present elements of the interventions introduced in Ghazni, Afghanistan, and consider a number of ethical issues stimulated by this analysis. Ethical challenges arise whenever humanitarian interventions to deal with complex political emergencies are undertaken: among those related to the case study presented are questions concerning: a) whether humanitarian support runs the risk of propping up repressive and (...)
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  14.  16
    Towards the Applied: The Construction of Ethical Positions in Stem Cell Translational Research. [REVIEW]Alan Cribb, Steven Wainwright, Clare Williams, Bobbie Farsides & Mike Michael - 2007 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (3):351-361.
    This paper aims to make an empirically informed analytical contribution to the development of a more socially embedded bioethics. Drawing upon 10 interviews with cutting edge stem cell researchers (5 scientists and 5 clinicians) it explores and illustrates the ways in which the role positions of translational researchers are shaped by the ‘normative structures’ of science and medicine respectively and in combination. The empirical data is used to illuminate three overlapping themes of ethical relevance: what matters in stem cell research, (...)
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  15.  15
    Facing Inconsistency: Theories and Our Relations to Them.Michaelis Michael - 2013 - Episteme 10 (4):351-367.
    Classical logic is explosive in the face of contradiction, yet we find ourselves using inconsistent theories. Mark Colyvan, one of the prominent advocates of the indispensability argument for realism about mathematical objects, suggests that such use can be garnered to develop an argument for commitment to inconsistent objects and, because of that, a paraconsistent underlying logic. I argue to the contrary that it is open to a classical logician to make distinctions, also needed by the paraconsistent logician, which allow a (...)
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  16.  2
    Comprehension, Apprehension, Prehension: Heterogeneity and the Public Understanding of Science.Mike Michael - 2002 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 27 (3):357-378.
    This article examines the main approaches to public understanding of science in light of recent developments in social and cultural theory. While traditional and critical perspectives on PUS differ in terms of their models of the public, science, and understanding, they nevertheless share a number of commonalities, which are humanism, incorporeality, and discrete sites. These are contrasted, respectively, to versions of the person as hybridic, to treatments of embodiment drawing especially on Whitehead’s notion of prehension, and to a rhizomic view (...)
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  17.  15
    These Boots Are Made for Walking...: Mundane Technology, the Body and Human-Environment Relations.Mike Michael - 2000 - Body and Society 6 (3-4):107-126.
    This article begins with a consideration of the `pure' unmediated relation between the human body and nature, exemplified, in different ways, by environmental expressivism, and Ingold's subtle analysis of affordance and the taskscape. It is argued that perspectives fail properly to incorporate the role of mundane technology in the mediation of human-nature relations. Drawing upon the work of Michael Serres, and, in particular, his concept of the parasite, I explore how these mundane technological artefacts - specifically, walking boots - intervene (...)
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  18. Belief De Re, Knowing Who, and Singular Thought.Michaelis Michael - 2010 - Journal of Philosophy 107 (6):293-310.
  19.  2
    Lay Discourses of Science: Science-in-General, Science-in-Particular, and Self.Mike Michael - 1992 - Science, Technology and Human Values 17 (3):313-333.
    The understanding of science by members of the public has been of increasing concern to social scientists. This article argues that such understanding, or the ostensible lack of it, is structured by discourses that address science both as an abstract entity or principle and as an activity directed at specific phenomena or problems. Drawing upon a wide range of interviews about various sources of ionizing radiation, it is suggested that understanding is tied to questions of social identity that encompass relations (...)
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  20.  31
    A Resource for Resistance: Power-Knowledge and Affordance. [REVIEW]Mike Michael & Arthur Still - 1992 - Theory and Society 21 (6):869-888.
  21.  1
    Expectation and Mobilisation: Enacting Future Users.Mike Michael & Alex Wilkie - 2009 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 34 (4):502-522.
    This article considers how the figure of the ``user'' is deployed to imagine the assembling of location-based mobile phone technologies in the context of UK policy. Drawing on the sociology of expectations, we address the performativity of the ``user'' in the think tank Demos' publication Mobilisation. In the process, we analyze how discourses about users enact particular futures that feature arrangements of, for example, persons, mobile phone technologies, and political institutions. We present two narrative strategies operating in Mobilisation: first, the (...)
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  22.  37
    Tichý on Kripke on A Posteriori Necessities.Michaelis Michael - 1998 - Philosophical Studies 92 (1/2):113 - 126.
    In Tichy's influential attack, a number of egregious errors are attributed to Kripke's seminal distinction of epistemic and metaphysical dimensions in meaning. I argue that Tichy's work is based on important misunderstandings. In particular Tichy attributes to Kripke the mistaken view that it is propositions, that is sets of worlds, which are the proper object of the appellation "a priori" and "a posteriori". I show that this is a mistaken attribution. Further, I argue that propositions cannot be uniquely associated with (...)
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  23.  1
    Freud's Theory of Dreams: A Philosophico-Scientific Perspective.Michael T. Michael - 2015 - Rowman & Littlefield.
    Michael T. Michael evaluates Freud s theory of dreams in light of major criticisms and scientific research. Approaching the issue from the vantage of the history and philosophy of science, he argues that the theory is a live hypothesis fully deserving of continued scientific exploration.".
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  24.  19
    From Correlation to Causation: What Do We Need in the Historical Sciences?Michaelis Michael, Malte Ebach & Wendy Shaw - 2016 - Acta Biotheoretica 64 (3):241-262.
    Changes in the methodology of the historical sciences make them more vulnerable to unjustifiable speculations being passed off as scientific results. The integrity of historical science is in peril due the way speculative and often unexamined causal assumptions are being used to generate data and underpin the identification of correlations in such data. A step toward a solution is to distinguish between plausible and speculative assumptions that facilitate the inference from measured and observed data to causal claims. One way to (...)
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  25.  50
    The Problems with Double-Indexing Accounts of the a Priori.Michaelis Michael - 2004 - Philosophical Studies 118 (1-2):67-81.
    Inspired by two-dimensional modal logic, some have sought to provide analyses of the notion of the contingent a priori which identify the a priori with truths which have a necessary diagonal. I argue that these analyses fail insofar as they miss the crucial epistemic aspect of the a priori. Augmenting these analyses with specifically epistemic accounts might be possible, but the interest would then reside in these epistemic accounts of the a priori and not in the formal models.
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  26.  1
    Accounting for Animal Experiments: Identity and Disreputable "Others".Lynda Birke & Mike Michael - 1994 - Science, Technology and Human Values 19 (2):189-204.
    This article considers how scientists involved in animal experimentation attempt to defend their practices. Interviews with over 40 scientists revealed that, over and above direct criticisms of the antivivisection lobby, scientists used a number of discursive strategies to demonstrate that critics of animal experimentation are ethically and epistemologically infenor to British scientific practitioners. The scientists portrayed a series of negative "others" such as foreign scientists, farmers, and pet owners. In this manner, they attempted to create a "socioethical domain" which rhetorically (...)
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  27.  1
    Switching Between Science and Culture in Transpecies Transplantation.Mike Michael & Nik Brown - 2001 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 26 (1):3-22.
    This article discusses xenotransplantation and examines the way its scientific promoters have defended their technology against potentially damaging public representations. The authors explore the criteria used to legitimate the selection of the pig as the best species from which to “harvest” transplant tissues in the future. The authors’ analysis shows that scientists and medical practitioners routinely switch between scientific and cultural repertoires. These repertoires enable such actors to exchange expert identities in scientific discourse for public identities in cultural discourse. These (...)
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  28.  68
    On the Validity of Freud's Dream Interpretations.Michael Michael - 2008 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 39 (1):52-64.
    In this article I defend Freud’s method of dream interpretation against those who criticise it as involving a fallacy—namely, the reverse causal fallacy—and those who criticise it as permitting many interpretations, indeed any that the interpreter wants to put on the dream. The first criticism misconstrues the logic of the interpretative process: it does not involve an unjustified reversal of causal relations, but rather a legitimate attempt at an inference to the best explanation. The judgement of whether or not a (...)
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  29.  36
    Utilitarianism and Retributivism: What's the Difference?Mark A. Michael - 1992 - American Philosophical Quarterly 29 (2):173 - 182.
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  30.  9
    Life, Death, and Meaning: Key Philosophical Readings on the Big Questions.Margaret A. Boden, Richard B. Brandt, Peter Caldwell, Fred Feldman, John Martin Fischer, Richard Hare, David Hume, W. D. Joske, Immanuel Kant, Frederick Kaufman, James Lenman, John Leslie, Steven Luper-Foy, Michaelis Michael, Thomas Nagel, Robert Nozick, Derek Parfit, George Pitcher, Stephen E. Rosenbaum, David Schmidtz, Arthur Schopenhauer, David B. Suits, Richard Taylor & Bernard Williams - 2004 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Do our lives have meaning? Should we create more people? Is death bad? Should we commit suicide? Would it be better if we were immortal? Should we be optimistic or pessimistic? Life, Death, and Meaning brings together key readings, primarily by English-speaking philosophers, on such 'big questions.'.
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  31.  60
    Problems with Lewis' Argument for the Identity Theory.Michaelis Michael - 2013 - Ratio 26 (1):51-61.
    David Lewis presented a celebrated argument for the identity theory of mind. His argument has provided the model for the program of analytic functionalism. He argues from two premises, that mental states are analytically tied to their causal roles and that, contingently, there is never a need to explain any physical change by going outside the realm of the physical, to the conclusion that mental states are physical. I show that his argument is mistaken and that it trades on a (...)
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  32.  22
    Being a Sociologist and Becoming a Whiteheadian.Michael Halewood & Mike Michael - unknown
    This article is an attempt to operationalize A.N. Whitehead's ontological approach within sociology. Whitehead offers lessons and clues to a way of re-envisioning `sociological practice' so that it captures something of the nature of a `social' that is at once real and constructed, material and cultural, and processual and actual. In the course of the article, the terms `operationalize' and `sociology' will themselves be transformed, not least because the range of objects and relations of study will far outstrip those common (...)
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  33.  5
    Philosophy in Mind: The Place of Philosophy in the Study of Mind.Murray Michael & John O'Leary-Hawthorne (eds.) - 1994 - Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    Increasingly, the mind is being treated as a fit subject for scientific inquiry. As cognitive science and empirical psychology strive to uncover the mind's secrets, it is fitting to inquire as to what distinctive role is left for philosophy in the study of mind. This collection, which includes contributions by some of the leading scholars in the field, offers a rich variety of perspectives on this issue. Topics addressed include: the place of a priori inquiry in philosophy of mind, moral (...)
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  34.  87
    Formal Causes: Definition, Explanation, and Primacy in Socratic and Aristotelian Thought, by Michael T. Ferejohn: Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013, Pp. Xii + 211, £35. [REVIEW]Michaelis Michael - 2015 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 93 (1):204-205.
  35.  8
    Liberalism, Environmentalism, and the Principle of Neutrality.Mark A. Michael - 2000 - Public Affairs Quarterly 14 (1):39-56.
  36.  25
    To Swat or Not to Swat: Pesky Flies, Environmental Ethics, and the Supererogatory.Mark A. Michael - 1996 - Environmental Ethics 18 (2):165-180.
    A central thesis of biocentrism is that all living things have intrinsic value. But when conflicts arise between the interests of humans and other organisms, this claim often has counterintuitive consequences. It would be wrong, for example, to swat pesky flies. Some biocentrists have responded by positing a taxonomy of interests in which human interests justifiably supersede those of other living things. I express doubts about whether this maneuver can succeed, and suggest that even if it does, it then commits (...)
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  37. Reviews : Michael Billig, Arguing and Thinking: A Rhetorical Approach to Social Psychology, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1989 (1987), Paper £9.95, Vi + 290 Pp. [REVIEW]Mike Michael - 1991 - History of the Human Sciences 4 (3):441-444.
  38.  27
    The Problem with Methodological Pragmatism.Mark A. Michael - 2012 - Environmental Ethics 34 (2):135-157.
    Methodological pragmatists argue that, given the dire state of the environment, the primary goal of environmentalists, including philosophers who work in environmental ethics, must be to work together to ensure that environmentally friendly policies are put into place. They must set aside their differences and not argue over their competing theoretical justifications of environmental policies, as that contributes to divisiveness among environmentalists and prevents this cooperation from occurring. The proposal to ignore disagreements over theory gets cashed out in three distinct (...)
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  39. The Hiss of History and the Sigh of Psychology.Mike Michael - 1997 - History of the Human Sciences 10 (2):133-139.
    Robert M. Farr, The Roots of Modern Social Psychology. Oxford: Blackwell, 1996. £40.00 (hbk), £12.99 (pbk), xvii + 204 pp. Graham Richards, Putting Psychology in its Place: An introduction from a critical historical perspective. London: Routledge, 1996. £40.00 (hbk), £12.99 (pbk), x + 197 pp. Daniel N. Robinson, An Intellectual History of Psychology, 3rd edn. London: Arnold, 1995. £14.99 (pbk), viii + 381 pp.
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  40.  43
    Why Aren’T More Philosophers Interested in Freud? Re-Evaluating Philosophical Arguments Against Psychoanalysis.Michael Michael - 2019 - Philosophia 47 (4):959-976.
    Despite its profound influence on modern thought, psychoanalysis remains peripheral to the concerns of most analytic philosophers. I suggest that one of the main reasons for this is intellectual reservation, and explore some philosophical arguments against psychoanalysis that may be contributing to such reservation. Specifically, I address the objections that psychoanalytic theories are unfalsifiable, that the purported findings of psychoanalysis are readily explained as due to suggestion, that there is a troubling lack of consensus in psychoanalytic interpretation, and that there (...)
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  41.  12
    What Do We Know About “Don't Knows”? Or, Contexts of “Ignorance”.Jill Turner & Mike Michael - 1996 - Social Science Information 35 (1):15-37.
    This paper addresses the meanings of “ignorance” in the context of “don't know” responses to questionnaires. First, we consider some of the broader functions of questionnaires, suggesting that they reflect and mediate between particular types of institutions, respondents and society. We then unpack some of the meanings of “don't know” responses. Specifically, we argue that the “don't know” response is not merely a sign of deficit but, potentially, a potent political statement. Moreover, in relation to studies of the public understanding (...)
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  42.  31
    A Companion To David Lewis, Edited by Barry Loewer and Jonathan Schaffer: Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell, 2015, Pp. Xii + 580, £130. [REVIEW]Michaelis Michael - 2017 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 95 (2):416-417.
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  43.  30
    Naming, Necessity, and More: Explorations in the Philosophical Work of Saul Kripke, Edited by Jonathan Berg: London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2014, Pp. Xiv + 245, £60. [REVIEW]Michaelis Michael - 2016 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 94 (4):836-836.
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  44.  12
    HIV, Globalization and Topology: Of Prepositions and Propositions.Mike Michael & Marsha Rosengarten - 2012 - Theory, Culture and Society 29 (4-5):93-115.
    In this article we explore how two enactments of HIV – the UN’s AIDS Clock and clinical trials for an HIV biomedical prevention technology or pre-exposure prophylaxis – entail particular globalizing and localizing dynamics. Drawing on Latour’s and Whitehead’s concept of proposition, and Serres’ call for a philosophy of prepositions, we use the composite notion of pre/pro-positions to trace the shifting topological status of HIV. For example, we show how PrEP emerges through topological entwinements of globalizing biomedical standardization, localizing protests (...)
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  45.  91
    S.J. Gould's Last Words.Michaelis Michael - 2003 - Metascience 12 (2):214-216.
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  46.  61
    Screening for Genetic Disorders: Therapeutic Abortion and IVF.M. Michael & S. Buckle - 1990 - Journal of Medical Ethics 16 (1):43-47.
    This paper examines a proposal to make use of IVF techniques to provide an alternative to therapeutic abortion of fetuses with genetic abnormalities. We begin by describing the proposed procedure, and then show that, considered in itself, it is morally on a par with therapeutic abortion. However, once the wider practical implications are brought into view, the proposed new procedure loses its initial appeal. The pros and cons are not sufficiently clear-cut entirely to rule out the IVF procedure, so the (...)
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  47.  23
    Philosophy, Certainty and Semantic Stretch.Michaelis Michael - 2017 - Australasian Philosophical Review 1 (3):281-290.
    ABSTRACTLloyd encourages us to look anew at philosophy and science by using a comparative methodology, comparing the familiar Western form of philosophy, for example, with the forms found in ancient China. Taking lessons from comparative biology, this paper attempts to show that such comparison can only take place when we understand what we are looking at in the familiar case. The question of the centrality of the drive for certainty is addressed. Why has certainty been so attractive and what does (...)
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  48.  30
    How Much Should A Person Consume?: Environmentalism In India and The United States. [REVIEW]Mark Michael - 2008 - Environmental Ethics 30 (1):97-100.
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  49.  3
    Life, Death, and Meaning: Key Philosophical Readings on the Big Questions.David Benatar, Margaret A. Boden, Peter Caldwell, Fred Feldman, John Martin Fischer, Richard Hare, David Hume, W. D. Joske, Immanuel Kant, Frederick Kaufman, James Lenman, John Leslie, Steven Luper, Michaelis Michael, Thomas Nagel, Robert Nozick, Derek Parfit, George Pitcher, Stephen E. Rosenbaum, David Schmidtz, Arthur Schopenhauer, David B. Suits, Richard Taylor, Bruce N. Waller & Bernard Williams (eds.) - 2004 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Do our lives have meaning? Should we create more people? Is death bad? Should we commit suicide? Would it be better to be immortal? Should we be optimistic or pessimistic? Since Life, Death, and Meaning: Key Philosophical Readings on the Big Questions first appeared, David Benatar's distinctive anthology designed to introduce students to the key existential questions of philosophy has won a devoted following among users in a variety of upper-level and even introductory courses.
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  50. Book Review: Rousseau, Gender, and Republican Will. [REVIEW]Mosher Michael - 2005 - Political Theory 33 (2):298-303.
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