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  1.  33
    After the DNR: Surrogates Who Persist in Requesting Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation.Ellen M. Robinson, Wendy Cadge, Angelika A. Zollfrank, M. Cornelia Cremens & Andrew M. Courtwright - 2017 - Hastings Center Report 47 (1):10-19.
    Some health care organizations allow physicians to withhold cardiopulmonary resuscitation from a patient, despite patient or surrogate requests that it be provided, when they believe it will be more harmful than beneficial. Such cases usually involve patients with terminal diagnoses whose medical teams argue that aggressive treatments are medically inappropriate or likely to be harmful. Although there is state-to-state variability and a considerable judicial gray area about the conditions and mechanisms for refusals to perform CPR, medical teams typically follow a (...)
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  2.  14
    Declining to Provide or Continue Requested Life-Sustaining Treatment: Experience With a Hospital Resolving Conflict Policy.Emily B. Rubin, Ellen M. Robinson, M. Cornelia Cremens, Thomas H. McCoy & Andrew M. Courtwright - 2023 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 20 (3):457-466.
    In 2015, the major critical care societies issued guidelines outlining a procedural approach to resolving intractable conflict between healthcare professionals and surrogates over life-sustaining treatments (LST). We report our experience with a resolving conflict procedure. This was a retrospective, single-centre cohort study of ethics consultations involving intractable conflict over LST. The resolving conflict process was initiated eleven times for ten patients over 2,015 ethics consultations from 2000 to 2020. In all cases, the ethics committee recommended withdrawal of the contested LST. (...)
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  3.  24
    Ethics Consultation for Adult Solid Organ Transplantation Candidates and Recipients: A Single Centre Experience.Andrew M. Courtwright, Kim S. Erler, Julia I. Bandini, Mary Zwirner, M. Cornelia Cremens, Thomas H. McCoy, Ellen M. Robinson & Emily Rubin - 2021 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 18 (2):291-303.
    Systematic study of the intersection of ethics consultation services and solid organ transplants and recipients can identify and illustrate ethical issues that arise in the clinical care of these patients, including challenges beyond resource allocation. This was a single-centre, retrospective cohort study of all adult ethics consultations between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2017, at a large academic medical centre in the north-eastern United States. Of the 880 ethics consultations, sixty (6.8 per cent ) involved solid organ transplant, thirty-nine (...)
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  4.  18
    Experience with a Revised Hospital Policy on Not Offering Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation.Andrew M. Courtwright, Emily Rubin, Kimberly S. Erler, Julia I. Bandini, Mary Zwirner, M. Cornelia Cremens, Thomas H. McCoy & Ellen M. Robinson - 2020 - HEC Forum 34 (1):73-88.
    Critical care society guidelines recommend that ethics committees mediate intractable conflict over potentially inappropriate treatment, including Do Not Resuscitate status. There are, however, limited data on cases and circumstances in which ethics consultants recommend not offering cardiopulmonary resuscitation despite patient or surrogate requests and whether physicians follow these recommendations. This was a retrospective cohort of all adult patients at a large academic medical center for whom an ethics consult was requested for disagreement over DNR status. Patient demographic predictors of ethics (...)
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  5.  32
    The Changing Composition of a Hospital Ethics Committee: A Tertiary Care Center’s Experience. [REVIEW]Andrew Courtwright, Sharon Brackett, Alexandra Cist, M. Cornelia Cremens, Eric L. Krakauer & Ellen M. Robinson - 2014 - HEC Forum 26 (1):59-68.
    A growing body of research has demonstrated significant heterogeneity of hospital ethics committee (HEC) size, membership and training requirements, length of appointment, institutional support, clinical and policy roles, and predictors of self identified success. Because these studies have focused on HECs at a single point in time, however, little is known about how the composition of HECs changes over time and what impact these changes have on committee utilization. The current study presents 20 years of data on the evolution of (...)
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