31 found
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  1.  17
    Reviewing the Womb.Elizabeth Chloe Romanis, Dunja Begović, Margot R. Brazier & Alexandra Katherine Mullock - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (12):820-829.
    Throughout most of human history women have been defined by their biological role in reproduction, seen first and foremost as gestators, which has led to the reproductive system being subjected to outside interference. The womb was perceived as dangerous and an object which husbands, doctors and the state had a legitimate interest in controlling. In this article, we consider how notions of conflict surrounding the womb have endured over time. We demonstrate how concerns seemingly generated by the invisibility of reproduction (...)
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  2.  6
    Great Idea: What a Fuss About a Swab.Margot R. Brazier - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (8):534-535.
    Developing a simple test to identify swiftly neonates with sepsis who carry the genetic variant which means that one dose of the recommended antibiotic, gentamicin, will cause the child to become profoundly deaf looks like an admirable objective. The baby needs antibiotics and needs them within 1 hour of admission to the neonatal intensive care unit. Conventional genetic tests take much longer to yield results. The test being trialled produces results in 25 min; a baby who carries the variant can (...)
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  3.  14
    Not so New Directions in the Law of Consent? ExaminingMontgomery V Lanarkshire Health Board.Anne Maree Farrell & Margaret Brazier - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (2):85-88.
  4.  71
    Exploitation and Enrighment: The Paradox of Medical Experimentation.M. Brazier - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (3):180--183.
    Modern medicine is built on a long history of medical experimentation. Experiments in the past often exploited more vulnerable patients. Questionable ethics litter the history of medicine. Without such experiments, however, millions of lives would be forfeited. This paper asks whether all the ``unethical'' experiments of the past were unjustifiable, and do we still exploit the poorer members of the community today? It concludes by wondering if Harris is right in his advocacy of a moral duty to participate in medical (...)
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  5. Hard Cases Make Bad Law?M. Brazier - 1997 - Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (6):341-343.
  6.  25
    The Organs Crisis and the Spanish Model: Theoretical Versus Pragmatic Considerations.M. Quigley, M. Brazier, R. Chadwick, M. N. Michel & D. Paredes - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (4):223-224.
    In the United Kingdom, the debate about how best to meet the shortfall of organs for transplantation has persisted on and off for many years. It is often presumed that the answer is simply to alter the law to a system of presumed consent. Acting perhaps on that presumption in his annual report launched in July, the Chief Medical Officer, Sir Liam Donaldson, advocated a system of organ donation based on presumed consent, the so-called “opt-out” system.1 He is calling for (...)
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  7.  28
    Respecting the Living Means Respecting the Dead Too.Sheelagh McGuinness & Margaret Brazier - 2008 - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 28 (2):297-316.
    Why should we respect the wishes which individuals may have about how their body is treated after death? Reflecting on how and why the law respects the bodies of the living, we argue that we must also respect the ‘dead’. We contest the relevance of the argument ‘the dead have no interests’, rather we think that the pertinent argument is ‘the living have interests in what happens to their dead bodies’. And, we advance arguments why we should also respect the (...)
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  8.  24
    Organ Retention and Return: Problems of Consent.M. Brazier - 2003 - Journal of Medical Ethics 29 (1):30-33.
    This paper explores difficulties around consent in the context of organ retention and return. It addresses the proposals of the Independent Review Group in Scotland on the Retention of Organs at Post Mortem to speak of authorisation rather than consent. Practical problems about whose consent determines disputes in relation to organ retention are explored. If a young child dies and his mother refuses consent but his father agrees what should ensue? Should the expressed wishes of a deceased adult override the (...)
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  9.  2
    Protecting the Vulnerable: Autonomy and Consent in Health Care.Margaret Brazier & Mary Lobjoit (eds.) - 1991 - Routledge.
    The right of adults with sound mind to consent to treatment or risk their own health for the benefit of the community in a clinical trial is unequivocally recognised by the law. But what about those vulnerable by virtue of their age, nature or position in society? Experts from the fields of medicine, philosophy, theology and law, explore the ethical and legal principles which seek to reconcile the individual's right to autonomy with the need to protect vulnerable groups. Discussions refer (...)
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  10. Protecting the Vulnerable: Autonomy and Consent in Health Care.Margaret Brazier & Mary Lobjoit (eds.) - 1991 - Routledge.
    The right of adults with sound mind to consent to treatment or risk their own health for the benefit of the community in a clinical trial is unequivocally recognised by the law. But what about those vulnerable by virtue of their age, nature or position in society? Experts from the fields of medicine, philosophy, theology and law, explore the ethical and legal principles which seek to reconcile the individual's right to autonomy with the need to protect vulnerable groups. Discussions refer (...)
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  11. Deceased Organ Donation: In Praise of Pragmatism.Margaret Brazier & Muireann Quigley - 2007 - Clinical Ethics 2 (4):164-165.
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  12. Helping Doctors Become Better Doctors: Mary Lobjoit—an Unsung Heroine of Medical Ethics in the UK.Margaret R. Brazier, Raanan Gillon & John Harris - 2012 - Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (6):383-385.
    Medical Ethics has many unsung heros and heroines. Here we celebrate one of these and on telling part of her story hope to place modern medical ethics and bioethics in the UK more centrally within its historical and human contex.
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  13.  48
    Letting Babies Die.M. Brazier & D. Archard - 2007 - Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (3):125-126.
    Prolonging neonatal lifeThe paradox that medicine’s success breeds medicine’s problems is well known to readers of the Journal of Medical Ethics. Advances in neonatal medicine have worked wonders. Not long ago, extremely premature birth babies, or those born with very serious health problems, would inevitably have died. Today, neonatologists can resuscitate babies born at ever-earlier stages of gestation. And very ill babies also benefit from advances in neonatal intensive care. Infant lives can be prolonged. Unfortunately, several such babies will not (...)
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  14. AB: The Action of Anaesthetics on the Nervous System with Special Reference to the Brain Stern Reticular System.M. Brazier - 1954 - In J. F. Delafresnaye (ed.), Brain Mechanisms and Consciousness. Blackwell. pp. 163.
     
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  15. Editorial: Letting Babies Die.Margaret Brazier & David Archard - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics.
     
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  16. The Age of Deference-a Historical Anomaly.Margaret Brazier - 2008 - In Michael D. A. Freeman (ed.), Law and Bioethics / Edited by Michael Freeman. Oxford University Press.
     
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  17. The Age of Deference: A Historical Anomaly.M. Brazier - 2008 - In Michael Freeman (ed.), Law and Bioethics: Current Legal Issues Volume 11. Oxford University Press.
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  18.  10
    Guest Editorial: A Tribute to the Very Reverend Edward Shotter.Raanan Gillon, Kenneth Boyd, Margaret Brazier, Alastair Campbell, Andrew Goddard, Wing May Kong, Sylvia Limerick, Stephen Lock & Jonathan Montgomery - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (10):629-630.
    We wish to describe and acknowledge the exceptional contributions to medical ethics, both in the UK and internationally, made by Edward Shotter1 who died at home on 3 July 2019. He was founder of the London Medical Group2 3 and instigator of similar student-led medical ethics groups throughout the UK; founder of the Institute of Medical Ethics4 and founder of the Journal of Medical Ethics. Ted Shotter transformed the study of medical ethics in the UK in the interests of patients (...)
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  19.  30
    A Brief Guide to the Human Tissue Act 2004.M. Brazier & S. Fovargue - 2006 - Clinical Ethics 1 (1):26-32.
    The Human Tissue Act 2004 is designed to regulate the storage and use of organs and tissues from the living, and the removal, storage and use of the same material from the deceased. It repeals much criticized legislation, including the Human Tissue Act 1961, and establishes a Human Tissue Authority to ensure compliance with the Act via a licensing and monitoring regime. When the Act comes into force, probably in April 2006, it will be a criminal offence not to comply (...)
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  20.  16
    Why We Wrote... Medicine, Patients and the Law.Margaret Brazier & Emma Cave - 2008 - Clinical Ethics 3 (4):205-208.
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  21.  29
    Letting Charlotte Die.M. Brazier - 2004 - Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (6):519-520.
    The High Court ruling that a premature baby should be not be resuscitatedLate in the afternoon of Thursday, 7 October 2004, Mr Justice Hedley ruled in a highly publicised dispute between parents and doctors about the future care of a severely disabled infant.1 With sadness, and some reluctance, the judge held that Charlotte Wyatt should not be subjected to any further invasive or aggressive treatment to prolong her life, despite her parents’ insistence that she be given every chance to survive (...)
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  22.  50
    Unfinished Feticide: A Legal Commentary.M. Brazier - 1990 - Journal of Medical Ethics 16 (2):68-70.
    Jansen expresses concern as to the legal implications of both selective reduction of pregnancy and unsuccessful attempts at termination of pregnancy using mifepristone. This commentary examines the legality of both procedures and concludes that Jansen is over-optimistic in his belief that neither procedure is likely to fall foul of the criminal laws on induced abortion. By contrast his anxieties about civil liability arising from the subsequent live birth of a damaged infant are, it is suggested, unnecessarily pessimistic. Such an action (...)
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  23. The Action of Anesthetics on the Nervous System.Mary Ab Brazier - 1954 - In J. F. Delafresnaye (ed.), Brain Mechanisms and Consciousness. Blackwell.
  24.  45
    Supply of Medicines: Paternalism, Autonomy and Reality.D. Prayle & M. Brazier - 1998 - Journal of Medical Ethics 24 (2):93-98.
    Radical changes are taking place in the United Kingdom in relation to the classification of, and access to, medicines. More and more medicines are being made available over the counter both in local pharmacies and in supermarkets. The provision of more open access to medicines may be hailed as a triumph for patient autonomy. This paper examines whether such a claim is real or illusory. It explores the ethical and legal implications of deregulating medicines. Do patients benefit? What is the (...)
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  25.  7
    Paper: Healthcare Scandals in the NHS: Crime and Punishment.Amel Alghrani, Margaret Brazier, Anne-Maree Farrell, Danielle Griffiths & Neil Allen - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (4):230-232.
    The Francis Report into failures of care at Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust Hospital documented a series of ‘shocking’ systematic failings in healthcare that left patients routinely neglected, humiliated and in pain as the Trust focused on cutting costs and hitting government targets. At present, the criminal law in England plays a limited role in calling healthcare professionals to account for failures in care. Normally, only if a gross error leads to death will a doctor or nurse face the prospect (...)
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  26. Fiduciary Relationship: An Ethical Approach and a Legal Concept?Margaret Brazier & Mary Lobjoit - 2001 - In Rebecca Bennett & Charles A. Erin (eds.), Hiv and Aids, Testing, Screening, and Confidentiality. Clarendon Press.
     
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  27. Protecting the Vulnerable: Autonomy and Consent in Health Care.Margaret Brazier & Mary Lobjoit (eds.) - 1991 - Routledge.
    Protecting the Vulnerable explores the reality of patient control and choice in health care and analyzes how decisions should be made on behalf of those deemed incapable of making decisions. The contributors, distinguished experts from the disciplines of medicine, ethics, theology, and law, look at the complex problem of autonomy and consent in health care and clinical research today from an illuminating perspective--its impact on the vulnerable members of society. The essays move from the exploration of lingering paternalism in health (...)
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  28.  8
    Where the Law and the Ethics Conflict?Margot Brazier - 2005 - Research Ethics 1 (3):97-100.
    An increasing number of scientists and doctors are concerned that new laws are inhibiting ethical research. This paper argues that this is not the case. Laws do not inhibit medical progress. Misunderstanding the law may do so.
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  29.  4
    John Hunter, A. A. Berthold and the Origins of Endocrinology by C. Barker Jørgensen. [REVIEW]Mary Brazier - 1973 - Isis 64:563-565.
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  30.  2
    Commentary on" Who Should Be Committable?".Margaret Brazier - 1995 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 2 (1):49-50.
  31.  2
    A Neuronal Basis for Ideas.Mary A. B. Brazier - 1950 - Dialectica 4 (3):237-242.