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  1.  8
    How Shekhinah Became the God(Dess) of Jewish Feminism.Luke Devine - 2014 - Feminism Theology 23 (1):71-91.
    Shekhinah, the ‘cloud of Yahweh’ in the Bible, a synonym for God’s presence in the rabbinic tradition, and a feminine hypostasis in the Kabbalah, is a popular theological image in contemporary Jewish feminist circles. Shekhinah currently exists in many forms: she is another name for God, feminine, relational, experiential; she is a Goddess and the singular image that is sufficiently adaptable for a diverse range of postmodern feminist interpreters. However, the processes by which Shekhinah became the God/dess of Jewish feminism (...)
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  2.  8
    Shekhinah as ‘Shield’ to Israel: Refiguring the Role of Divine Presence in Jewish Tradition and the Shoah.Luke Devine - 2016 - Feminist Theology 25 (1):62-88.
    The biblical, talmudic, midrashic, and mystical traditions, as well as contemporary Jewish feminist theologies, reveal a plethora of Shekhinah images. If tracked historically these readings, while diverse, reveal continuities even across traditions. These include Shekhinah’s ‘immanence’, ‘presence’, ‘exile’, and shared ‘suffering’. Another vital continuity is Shekhinah’s function as protective ‘shield’. Accordingly, in her gendered theology of the Shoah Raphael argues that Shekhinah was ‘present but concealed in Auschwitz because her female face was yet unknowable to women’. Raphael’s selectivist approach appropriates (...)
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    Active/Passive, ‘Diminished’/‘Beautiful’, ‘Light’ From Above and Below: Rereading Shekhinah’s Sexual Desire in Zohar Al Shir Ha-Shirim.Luke Devine - 2020 - Feminist Theology 28 (3):297-315.
    In Zohar al Shir ha-Shirim, the Zohar’s reading of Song of Songs, Shekhinah, echoing themes associated with the Shulamite of the biblical text, consistently initiates cosmic union. Sexual desire in the zoharic texts is a form of capital necessary to facilitate sefirotic intercourse, although scholarly readings of the zoharic corpus often identify Shekhinah as a passive receptacle. This, however, is only true if the endemic contradictions within the texts are glossed over. In Song of Songs, the Shulamite’s sexual ‘initiative’ is (...)
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