Results for 'Lucie Perillat'

964 found
Order:
  1.  1
    Clinical Recommendations: The Role of Mechanisms in the GRADE Framework.Lucie Perillat & Mathew Mercuri - 2022 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 96:1-9.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  21
    Self-Knowing Agents * By LUCY O'BRIEN.Lucy O’Brien - 2009 - Analysis 69 (1):187-188.
    How is it that we think and refer in the first-person way? For most philosophers in the analytic tradition, the problem is essentially this: how two apparently conflicting kinds of properties can be reconciled and united as properties of the same entity. What is special about the first person has to be reconciled with what is ordinary about it. The range of responses reduces to four basic options. The orthodox view is optimistic: there really is a way of reconciling these (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   88 citations  
  3.  57
    Book Symposium on Lucy Allais' Manifest Reality: Kant's Idealism and His Realism An Overview.Lucy Allais - 2016 - European Journal of Philosophy 24 (1):235-240.
  4.  36
    Manifest Reality: Kant's Idealism and His Realism.Lucy Allais - 2015 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Lucy Allais presents an original interpretation of Kant's transcendental idealism. She argues that his distinction between things in themselves and things as they appear to us has both epistemological and metaphysical components. Kant is committed to a genuine idealism about things as they appear to us, but this is not a phenomenalist idealism. He is committed to the claim that there is an aspect of reality that grounds mind-dependent spatio-temporal objects, and which we cannot cognize, but he does not assert (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   64 citations  
  5. Feeling togetherness online: a phenomenological sketch of online communal experiences.Lucy Osler - 2020 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 19 (3):569-588.
    The internet provides us with a multitude of ways of interacting with one another. In discussions about how technological innovations impact and shape our interpersonal interactions, there is a tendency to assume that encountering people online is essentially different to encountering people offline. Yet, individuals report feeling a sense of togetherness with one another online that echoes offline descriptions. I consider how we can understand people’s experiences of being together with others online, at least in certain instances, as arising out (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  6.  20
    Cancer Stem Cells: Philosophy and Therapies.Lucie Laplane - 2016 - Cambridge (Massachusetts): Harvard University Press.
    A new therapeutic strategy could break the stalemate in the war on cancer by targeting not all cancerous cells but the small fraction that lie at the root of cancers. Lucie Laplane offers a comprehensive analysis of cancer stem cell theory, based on an original interdisciplinary approach that combines biology, biomedical history, and philosophy.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  7. Taking Empathy Online.Lucy Osler - 2021 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy.
    Despite its long history of investigating sociality, phenomenology has, to date, said little about online sociality. The phenomenological tradition typically claims that empathy is the fundamental way in which we experience others and their experiences. While empathy is discussed almost exclusively in the context of face-to-face interaction, I claim that we can empathetically perceive others and their experiences in certain online situations. Drawing upon the phenomenological distinction between the physical, objective body and the expressive, lived body, I: (i) highlight that (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  8. ProAna Worlds: Affectivity and Echo Chambers Online.Lucy Osler & Joel Krueger - forthcoming - Topoi:1-11.
    Anorexia Nervosa (AN) is an eating disorder characterised by self-starvation. Accounts of AN typically frame the disorder in individualistic terms: e.g., genetic predisposition, perceptual disturbances of body size and shape, experiential bodily disturbances. Without disputing the role these factors may play in developing AN, we instead draw attention to the way disordered eating practices in AN are actively supported by others. Specifically, we consider how Pro-Anorexia (ProAna) websites — which provide support and solidarity, tips, motivational content, a sense of community, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  9. Privacy Versus Public Health? A Reassessment of Centralised and Decentralised Digital Contact Tracing.Lucie White & Philippe van Basshuysen - 2021 - Science and Engineering Ethics 27 (2):1-13.
    At the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, high hopes were placed on digital contact tracing. Digital contact tracing apps can now be downloaded in many countries, but as further waves of COVID-19 tear through much of the northern hemisphere, these apps are playing a less important role in interrupting chains of infection than anticipated. We argue that one of the reasons for this is that most countries have opted for decentralised apps, which cannot provide a means of rapidly informing users (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  10. Controlling the Noise: A Phenomenological Account of Anorexia Nervosa and the Threatening Body.Lucy Osler - 2021 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 28 (1):41-58.
    Anorexia Nervosa (AN) is a complex disorder characterised by self-starvation, an act of self-destruction. It is often described as a disorder marked by paradoxes and, despite extensive research attention, is still not well understood. Much AN research focuses upon the distorted body image that individuals with AN supposedly experience. However, based upon reports from individuals describing their own experience of AN, I argue that their bodily experience is much more complex than this focus might lead us to believe. Such research (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  11. Taking Watsuji Online: Betweenness and Expression in Online Spaces.Lucy Osler & Joel Krueger - 2021 - Continental Philosophy Review (1):1-23.
    In this paper, we introduce the Japanese philosopher Tetsurō Watsuji’s phenomenology of aidagara (“betweenness”) and use his analysis in the contemporary context of online space. We argue that Watsuji develops a prescient analysis anticipating modern technologically-mediated forms of expression and engagement. More precisely, we show that instead of adopting a traditional phenomenological focus on face-to-face interaction, Watsuji argues that communication technologies — which now include Internet-enabled technologies and spaces — are expressive vehicles enabling new forms of emotional expression, shared experiences, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  12. Please Like This Paper.Lucy McDonald - 2021 - Philosophy 96 (3):335-358.
    In this paper I offer a philosophical analysis of the act of ‘liking’ a post on social media. First, I consider what it means to ‘like’ something. I argue that ‘liking’ is best understood as a phatic gesture; it signals uptake and anoints the poster’s positive face. Next, I consider how best to theorise the power that comes with amassing many ‘likes’. I suggest that ‘like’ tallies alongside posts institute and record a form of digital social capital. Finally, I consider (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  13. Without a Trace: Why Did Corona Apps Fail?Lucie White & Philippe van Basshuysen - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (12):1-4.
    At the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, high hopes were put on digital contact tracing, using mobile phone apps to record and immediately notify contacts when a user reports as infected. Such apps can now be downloaded in many countries, but as second waves of COVID-19 are raging, these apps are playing a less important role than anticipated. We argue that this is because most countries have opted for app configurations that cannot provide a means of rapidly informing users of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  14. Your Word Against Mine: The Power of Uptake.Lucy McDonald - 2020 - Synthese 199 (1-2):3505-3526.
    Uptake is typically understood as the hearer’s recognition of the speaker’s communicative intention. According to one theory of uptake, the hearer’s role is merely as a ratifier. The speaker, by expressing a particular communicative intention, predetermines what kind of illocutionary act she might perform. Her hearer can then render this act a success or a failure. Thus the hearer has no power over which act could be performed, but she does have some power over whether it is performed. Call this (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  15. Bodily Saturation and Social Disconnectedness in Depression.Lucy Osler - 2021 - Phenomenology and Mind 21:48-61.
    Individuals suffering from depression consistently report experiencing a lack of connectedness with others. David Karp (2017, 73), in his memoir and study of depression, has gone so far to describe depression as “an illness of isolation, a disease of disconnectedness”. It has become common, in phenomenological circles, to attribute this social impairment to the depressed individual experiencing their body as corporealized, acting as a barrier between them and the world around them (Fuchs 2005, 2016). In this paper, I offer an (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  16.  33
    A New Perspective on Time and Physical Laws.Lucy Margaret Ellen James - forthcoming - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science.
    Callender claims that `time is the great informer', meaning that the direction in which our `best' physical theories inform are temporal. This is intended to be a metaphysical claim, and as such expresses a relationship between the physical world and information-gathering systems such as ourselves. This paper gives two counterexamples to this claim, illustrating the fact that time and informative strength doubly dissociate, so the claim cannot be about physical theories in general. The first is a case where physical theories (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  17. .Lucy Allais - 2015
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  18. How to Overcome Lockdown: Selective Isolation Versus Contact Tracing.Lucie White & Philippe van Basshuysen - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (11):724-725.
    At this stage of the COVID-19 pandemic, two policy aims are imperative: avoiding the need for a general lockdown of the population, with all its economic, social and health costs, and preventing the healthcare system from being overwhelmed by the unchecked spread of infection. Achieving these two aims requires the consideration of unpalatable measures. Julian Savulescu and James Cameron argue that mandatory isolation of the elderly is justified under these circumstances, as they are at increased risk of becoming severely ill (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  19. The Need for Authenticity-Based Autonomy in Medical Ethics.Lucie White - 2018 - HEC Forum 30 (3):191-209.
    The notion of respect for autonomy dominates bioethical discussion, though what qualifies precisely as autonomous action is notoriously elusive. In recent decades, the notion of autonomy in medical contexts has often been defined in opposition to the notion of autonomy favoured by theoretical philosophers. Where many contemporary theoretical accounts of autonomy place emphasis on a condition of “authenticity”, the special relation a desire must have to the self, bioethicists often regard such a focus as irrelevant to the concerns of medical (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  20. Can One Both Contribute to and Benefit From Herd Immunity?Lucie White - 2021 - Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 14 (2).
    In a recent article, Ethan Bradley and Mark Navin (2021) argue that vaccine refusal is not akin to free riding. Here, I defend one connection between vaccine refusal and free riding and suggest that, when viewed in conjunction with their other arguments, this might constitute a reason to mandate Covid-19 vaccination.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  21. An Epistemology for Practical Knowledge.Lucy Campbell - 2018 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 48 (2):159-177.
    Anscombe thought that practical knowledge – a person’s knowledge of what she is intentionally doing – displays formal differences to ordinary empirical, or ‘speculative’, knowledge. I suggest these differences rest on the fact that practical knowledge involves intention analogously to how speculative knowledge involves belief. But this claim conflicts with the standard conception of knowledge, according to which knowledge is an inherently belief-involving phenomenon. Building on John Hyman’s account of knowledge as the ability to use a fact as a reason, (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  22.  64
    A Case for a Duty to Feed the Hungry: GM Plants and the Third World.Lucy Carter - 2007 - Science and Engineering Ethics 13 (1):69-82.
    This article is concerned with a discussion of the plausibility of the claim that GM technology has the potential to provide the hungry with sufficient food for subsistence. Following a brief outline of the potential applications of GM in this context, a history of the green revolution and its impact will be discussed in relation to the current developing world agriculture situation. Following a contemporary analysis of malnutrition, the claim that GM technology has the potential to provide the hungry with (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   56 citations  
  23.  7
    The New Rhetoric: A Treatise on Argumentation.Chaïm Perelman & Lucie Olbrechts-Tyteca - 1969 - Notre Dame, IN, USA: Notre Dame University Press.
    The New Rhetoric is founded on the idea that since “argumentation aims at securing the adherence of those to whom it is addressed, it is, in its entirety, relative to the audience to be influenced,” says Chaïm Perelman and L. Olbrechts-Tyteca, and they rely, in particular, for their theory of argumentation on the twin concepts of universal and particular audiences: while every argument is directed to a specific individual or group, the orator decides what information and what approaches will achieve (...)
    No categories
  24.  6
    Don't Put All Your Speech-Acts in One Basket: Situating Animal Activism in the Deliberative System.Lucy J. Parry - 2017 - Environmental Values 26 (4):437-455.
    In this article I offer the deliberative systems approach as a normative and evaluative approach through which to appraise typically 'non-deliberative' animal activism. Although such actions can contribute to inclusive deliberation through the political representation of animals, I caution against an over-reliance on such tactics, and interrogate the claim that non-deliberative tactics are essential ingredients for prompting the reflection and reconsideration that animal rights philosophy demands. Instead, non-deliberative activism may serve not only to undermine further deliberation but actually to jeopardise (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  25. Kant, Non-Conceptual Content and the Representation of Space.Lucy Allais - 2009 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (3):pp. 383-413.
    :Space is not an empirical concept that has been drawn from outer experiences. For in order for certain sensations to be related to something outside me , thus in order for me to represent them as outside and next to one another, thus not merely different but as in different places, the representation of space must already be their ground. Thus the representation of space cannot be obtained from the relations of outer appearance through experience, but this outer experience is (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   103 citations  
  26.  36
    Symbiotic Empirical Ethics: A Practical Methodology.Lucy Frith - 2012 - Bioethics 26 (4):198-206.
    Like any discipline, bioethics is a developing field of academic inquiry; and recent trends in scholarship have been towards more engagement with empirical research. This ‘empirical turn’ has provoked extensive debate over how such ‘descriptive’ research carried out in the social sciences contributes to the distinctively normative aspect of bioethics. This paper will address this issue by developing a practical research methodology for the inclusion of data from social science studies into ethical deliberation. This methodology will be based on a (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   36 citations  
  27.  39
    Do They Speak Language?Lucie Čadková - 2015 - Biosemiotics 8 (1):9-27.
    The question: are humans the only animals endowed with language? must be preceded by the question: what makes language a unique communication system? The American linguist Charles F. Hockett answers the second question by listing what he considers the criteria that differentiate language from other communication systems. His ‘design-feature’ approach, first presented in 1958, has become a popular tool by which the communication systems of non-human animals are guaranteed a priori exclusion from the notion of language. However, the results of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  28.  88
    Lying: An Experimental Investigation of the Role of Situational Factors.Lucy F. Ackert, Bryan K. Church, Xi Kuang & Li Qi - 2011 - Business Ethics Quarterly 21 (4):605-632.
    Individuals often lie for psychological rewards (e.g., preserving self image and/or protecting others), absent economic rewards. We conducted a laboratory experiment, using a modified dictator game, to identify conditions that entice individuals to lie solely for psychological rewards. We argue that such lies can provide a ready means for individuals to manage others’ impression of them. We investigated the effect of social distance (the perceived familiarity, intimacy, or psychological proximity between two parties) and knowledge of circumstances (whether parties have common (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  29.  26
    Nietzsche and Jung: The Whole Self in the Union of Opposites.Lucy Huskinson - 2004 - Brunner-Routledge.
    This book considers the thought and personalities of two popular icons of twentieth century philosophical and psychological thought - Nietzsche and Jung - and reveals the extraordinary connections between them. Through a thorough examination of their work, Nietzsche and Jung succeeds in illuminating complex areas of Nietzsche's thought and resolving ambiguities in Jung's reception of these theories. This demonstration of how our understanding of analytical psychology can be enriched by investigating its philosophical roots will be of great interest to students (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  30. (Un)Wanted Feelings in Anorexia Nervosa: Making the Visceral Body Mine Again.Lucy Osler - 2021 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 28 (1):67-69.
    In my article "Controlling the noise," I present a phenomenological investigation of bodily experience in anorexia nervosa. Turning to descriptions of those who have suffered from AN, which repeatedly detail the experience of finding their bodies threatening, out of control and noisy, I suggest that the phenomenological conceptions of body-as-object, body-as-subject and visceral body can help us unpack the complex bodily experience of AN throughout its various stages. My claim is that self-starvation is enacted by a bodily-subject who wishes to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  31.  6
    The Acceptability of Using a Lottery to Allocate Research Funding: A Survey of Applicants.Lucy Pomeroy, Tony Blakely, Adrian Barnett, Philip Clarke, Vernon Choy & Mengyao Liu - 2020 - Research Integrity and Peer Review 5 (1).
    BackgroundThe Health Research Council of New Zealand is the first major government funding agency to use a lottery to allocate research funding for their Explorer Grant scheme. This is a somewhat controversial approach because, despite the documented problems of peer review, many researchers believe that funding should be allocated solely using peer review, and peer review is used almost ubiquitously by funding agencies around the world. Given the rarity of alternative funding schemes, there is interest in hearing from the first (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  32. Self-Knowing Agents.Lucy O'Brien - 2007 - Oxford University Press.
    Lucy O'Brien argues that a satisfactory account of first-person reference and self-knowledge needs to concentrate on our nature as agents. Clearly written, with rigorous discussion of rival views, this book will be of interest to anyone working in the philosophy of mind and action.
  33.  26
    Understanding Agri-Food Networks as Social Relations.Lucy Jarosz - 2000 - Agriculture and Human Values 17 (3):279-283.
    Actor network theory and supply chainmanagement theory provide suggestive researchdirections for understanding regional agri-foodnetworks. These theories claim that relationshipsbased upon trust and cooperation are critical to thestrength and vitality of the network. This means thatexploring and detailing these relationships among thesuppliers, producers, workers, processors, brokers,wholesalers, and retailers within specific regionalgeographies of these networks are critical forfurthering cooperation and trust. Key areas ofcooperation include resource sharing andapprenticeship programs. Employing food networks as akey unit of contextual analysis will deepen ourunderstanding of how (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  34. Wiping the Slate Clean: The Heart of Forgiveness.Lucy Allais - 2008 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 36 (1):33–68.
  35. How Autonomy Can Legitimate Beneficial Coercion.Lucie White - 2017 - In Jakov Gather, Tanja Henking, Alexa Nossek & Jochen Vollmann (eds.), Beneficial Coercion in Psychiatry? Foundations and Challenges. Münster: Mentis. pp. 85-99.
    Respect for autonomy and beneficence are frequently regarded as the two essential principles of medical ethics, and the potential for these two principles to come into conflict is often emphasised as a fundamental problem. On the one hand, we have the value of beneficence, the driving force of medicine, which demands that medical professionals act to protect or promote the wellbeing of patients or research subjects. On the other, we have a principle of respect for autonomy, which demands that we (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  36. Stem Cells and the Temporal Boundaries of Development: Toward a Species-Dependent View.Lucie Laplane - 2011 - Biological Theory 6 (1):48-58.
    The tacit standard view that development ends once reproductive capacity is acquired (reproductive boundary, or ‘‘RB,’’ thesis) has recently been challenged by biologists and philosophers of biology arguing that development continues until death (death boundary, or ‘‘DB,’’ thesis). The relevance of these two theses is difficult to assess because the fact that there is no precise definition of development makes the determination of its temporal boundaries problematic. Taking into account this difficulty, this article tries to develop a new species-dependent perspective (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  37.  61
    Propositionalism About Intention: Shifting the Burden of Proof.Lucy Campbell - 2019 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 49 (2):230-252.
    ABSTRACTA widespread view in the philosophy of mind and action holds that intentions are propositional attitudes. Call this view ‘Propositionalism about Intention’. The key alternative holds that intentions have acts, or do-ables, as their contents. Propositionalism is typically accepted by default, rather than argued for in any detail. By appealing to a key metaphysical constraint on any account of intention, I argue that on the contrary, it is the Do-ables View which deserves the status of the default position, and Propositionalism (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  38. Transcendental Idealism and the Transcendental Deduction.Lucy Allais - 2011 - In Dennis Schulting & Jacco Verburgt (eds.), Kant's Idealism. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 91-107.
  39.  11
    Conceptual Frameworks for Social and Cultural Big Data Analytics: Answering the Epistemological Challenge.Lucy Resnyansky - 2019 - Big Data and Society 6 (1).
    This paper aims to contribute to the development of tools to support an analysis of Big Data as manifestations of social processes and human behaviour. Such a task demands both an understanding of the epistemological challenge posed by the Big Data phenomenon and a critical assessment of the offers and promises coming from the area of Big Data analytics. This paper draws upon the critical social and data scientists’ view on Big Data as an epistemological challenge that stems not only (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  40.  18
    Direct and Indirect Influences of Executive Functions on Mathematics Achievement.Lucy Cragg, Sarah Keeble, Sophie Richardson, Hannah E. Roome & Camilla Gilmore - 2017 - Cognition 162 (C):12-26.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  41.  18
    Phenomenotechnique: Bachelard's Critical Inheritance of Conventionalism.Lucie Fabry - 2019 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 75:34-42.
  42. Kant’s Racism.Lucy Allais - 2016 - Philosophical Papers 45 (1-2):1-36.
    After a long period of comparative neglect, in the last few decades growing numbers of philosophers have been paying attention to the startling contrast presented between Kant’s universal moral theory, with its inspiring enlightenment ideas of human autonomy, equality and dignity and Kant’s racism. Against Charles Mills, who argues that the way to make Kant consistent is by attributing to him a threshold notion of moral personhood, according to which some races do not qualify for consideration under the categorical imperative, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  43.  20
    Self‐Knowledge: Expression Without Expressivism.Lucy Campbell - 2022 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 104 (1):186-208.
    Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, Volume 104, Issue 1, Page 186-208, January 2022.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  44.  3
    Living with Spinal Cord Stimulation: Doing Embodiment and Incorporation.Lucie Dalibert - 2016 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 41 (4):635-659.
    Seen as contributing to human enhancement, implanted technologies have recently been receiving a lot of attention. However, reflections on these technologies have taken the shape of rather speculative ethical judgments on “hyped” technological devices. On the other hand, while science and technology studies and philosophy of technology have a long tradition of analyzing how technological artifacts and tools transform and configure our lives, they tend to focus on use configurations rather than the intimate relations brought about by implanted technologies. Even (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  45. See You Online.Lucy Osler - 2020 - The Philosophers' Magazine 3 (90):80-86.
    Connecting with others online is not a new practice, of course. However, with lockdown measures in place across much of the globe, our social lives have been forced to migrate online to an even greater degree and intensity than ever before. While many decry the poverty of online social encounters, what underlies this debate is a philosophical question about how it is we encounter one another online. Perhaps somewhat counterintuitively, I explore how, in many cases, we directly perceive others and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  46. Engineering Affect: Emotion Regulation, the Internet, and the Techno-Social Niche.Joel Krueger & Lucy Osler - 2019 - Philosophical Topics 47 (2):205-231.
    Philosophical work exploring the relation between cognition and the Internet is now an active area of research. Some adopt an externalist framework, arguing that the Internet should be seen as environmental scaffolding that drives and shapes cognition. However, despite growing interest in this topic, little attention has been paid to how the Internet influences our affective life — our moods, emotions, and our ability to regulate these and other feeling states. We argue that the Internet scaffolds not only cognition but (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  47. Were Lockdowns Justified? A Return to the Facts and Evidence.Philippe van Basshuysen & Lucie White - 2021 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 31 (4):405-428.
    Were governments justified in imposing lockdowns to contain the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic? We argue that a convincing answer to this question is to date wanting, by critically analyzing the factual basis of a recent paper, “How Government Leaders Violated Their Epistemic Duties During the SARS-CoV-2 Crisis” (Winsberg et al. 2020). In their paper, Winsberg et al. argue that government leaders did not, at the beginning of the pandemic, meet the epistemic requirements necessitated to impose lockdowns. We focus on (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  48.  11
    Music, Gender, Education.Lucy Green - 1997 - Cambridge University Press.
    This is the first book to focus on the role of education in relation to music and gender. Invoking a concept of musical patriarchy and a theory of the social construction of musical meaning, Lucy Green shows how women's musical practices and gendered musical meanings have been reproduced, hand-in-hand, through history. Dr. Green views the contemporary school music classroom as a microcosm of the wider society, and reveals the participation of music education in the continued production and reproduction of gendered (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  49.  4
    Contacting Gamete Donors to Facilitate Diagnostic Genetic Testing for the Donor-Conceived Child: What Are the Rights and Obligations of Gamete Donors in These Cases? A Response to Horton Et Al.Lucy Frith - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (3):220-222.
    In their paper Horton et al argue that it is acceptable to contact an anonymous egg-donor to facilitate diagnostic genetic testing for the donor conceived child, despite the donor, ‘indicating on a historical consent form that she did not wish to take part in future research, and that she did not wish to be informed if she was found to be a carrier of a “harmful inherited condition”’. There are a number of claims embedded in Horton et al’s position that (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  50.  30
    Sociality and Embodiment: Online Communication During and After Covid-19.Lucy Osler & Dan Zahavi - forthcoming - Foundations of Science:1-18.
    During the Covid-19 pandemic we increasingly turned to technology to stay in touch with our family, friends, and colleagues. Even as lockdowns and restrictions ease many are encouraging us to embrace the replacement of face-to-face encounters with technologically mediated ones. Yet, as philosophers of technology have highlighted, technology can transform the situations we find ourselves in. Drawing insights from the phenomenology of sociality, we consider how digitally-enabled forms of communication and sociality impact our experience of one another. In particular, we (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 964