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Louise Keogh [3]Louise Anne Keogh [1]Louise A. Keogh [1]
  1.  2
    Junior Doctors and Conscientious Objection to Voluntary Assisted Dying: Ethical Complexity in Practice.Rosalind J. McDougall, Ben P. White, Danielle Ko, Louise Keogh & Lindy Willmott - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (8):517-521.
    In jurisdictions where voluntary assisted dying is legal, eligibility assessments, prescription and administration of a VAD substance are commonly performed by senior doctors. Junior doctors’ involvement is limited to a range of more peripheral aspects of patient care relating to VAD. In the Australian state of Victoria, where VAD has been legal since June 2019, all health professionals have a right under the legislation to conscientiously object to involvement in the VAD process, including provision of information about VAD. While this (...)
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  2.  7
    Understanding the Reasons Behind Healthcare Providers’ Conscientious Objection to Voluntary Assisted Dying in Victoria, Australia.Casey M. Haining, Louise A. Keogh & Lynn H. Gillam - 2021 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 18 (2):277-289.
    During the debates about the legalization of Voluntary Assisted Dying in Victoria, Australia, the presence of anti-VAD health professionals in the medical community and reported high rates of conscientious objection to VAD suggested access may be limited. Most empirical research on CO has been conducted in the sexual and reproductive health context. However, given the fundamental differences in the nature of such procedures and the legislation governing it, these findings may not be directly transferable to VAD. Accordingly, we sought to (...)
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  3. “I Haven’T Had to Bare My Soul but Now I Kind of Have To”: Describing How Voluntary Assisted Dying Conscientious Objectors Anticipated Approaching Conversations with Patients in Victoria, Australia.Louise Anne Keogh & Casey Michelle Haining - 2021 - BMC Medical Ethics 22 (1):1-12.
    BackgroundDealing with end of life is challenging for patients and health professionals alike. The situation becomes even more challenging when a patient requests a legally permitted medical service that a health professional is unable to provide due to a conflict of conscience. Such a scenario arises when Victorian health professionals, with a conscientious objection to voluntary assisted dying, are presented with patients who request VAD or merely ask about VAD. The Voluntary Assisted Dying Act 2017 recognizes the inherent conflict of (...)
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    Study Protocol: The Australian Genetics and Life Insurance Moratorium—Monitoring the Effectiveness and Response (A-GLIMMER) Project.Paul Lacaze, Louise Keogh, Margaret Otlowski, Ingrid Winship, Kristine Barlow-Stewart, Martin Delatycki, Penny Gleeson, Tiffany Boughtwood, Andrea Belcher, Aideen McInerney-Leo & Jane Tiller - 2021 - BMC Medical Ethics 22 (1):1-14.
    BackgroundThe use of genetic test results in risk-rated insurance is a significant concern internationally, with many countries banning or restricting the use of genetic test results in underwriting. In Australia, life insurers’ use of genetic test results is legal and self-regulated by the insurance industry ). In 2018, an Australian Parliamentary Inquiry recommended that insurers’ use of genetic test results in underwriting should be prohibited. In 2019, the FSC introduced an industry self-regulated moratorium on the use of genetic test results. (...)
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    ‘There is a Lot of Good in Knowing, but There is Also a Lot of Downs’: Public Views on Ethical Considerations in Population Genomic Screening.Amelia K. Smit, Gillian Reyes-Marcelino, Louise Keogh, Anne E. Cust & Ainsley J. Newson - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (12):28-28.
    Publics are key stakeholders in population genomic screening and their perspectives on ethical considerations are relevant to programme design and policy making. Using semi-structured interviews, we explored social views and attitudes towards possible future provision of personalised genomic risk information to populations to inform prevention and/or early detection of relevant conditions. Participants were members of the public who had received information on their personal genomic risk of melanoma as part of a research project. The focus of the analysis presented here (...)
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