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Louis C. Charland [82]Louis Charland [9]Louis Christian Charland [3]
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Louis C. Charland
PhD: University of Western Ontario
  1. Cynthia's Dilemma: Consenting to Heroin Prescription.Louis C. Charland - 2002 - American Journal of Bioethics 2 (2):37-47.
    Heroin prescription involves the medical provision of heroin in the treatment of heroin addiction. Rudimentary clinical trials on that treatment modality have been carried out and others are currently underway or in development. However, it is questionable whether subjects considered for such trials are mentally competent to consent to them. The problem has not been sufficiently appreciated in ethical and clinical discussions of the topic. The challenges involved throw new light on the role of value and accountability in contemporary discussions (...)
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  2.  49
    Decision-Making Capacity.Jennifer Hawkins & Louis C. Charland - 2020 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Decision-Making Capacity First published Tue Jan 15, 2008; substantive revision Fri Aug 14, 2020 In many Western jurisdictions the law presumes that adult persons, and sometimes children that meet certain criteria, are capable of making their own medical decisions; for example, consenting to a particular medical treatment, or consenting to participate in a research trial. But what exactly does it mean to say that a subject has or lacks the requisite capacity to decide? This question has to do with what (...)
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  3.  45
    Decision-Making Capacity.Louis Charland - 2011 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    In many Western jurisdictions, the law presumes that adult persons, and sometimes children that meet certain criteria, are capable of making their own health care decisions; for example, consenting to a particular medical treatment, or consenting to participate in a research trial. But what exactly does it mean to say that a subject has or lacks the requisite capacity to decide? This last question has to do with what is commonly called “decisional capacity,” a central concept in health care law (...)
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  4. The Natural Kind Status of Emotion.Louis C. Charland - 2002 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 53 (4):511-37.
    It has been argued recently that some basic emotions should be considered natural kinds. This is different from the question whether as a class emotions form a natural kind; that is, whether emotion is a natural kind. The consensus on that issue appears to be negative. I argue that this pessimism is unwarranted and that there are in fact good reasons for entertaining the hypothesis that emotion is a natural kind. I interpret this to mean that there exists a distinct (...)
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  5. Reconciling Cognitive and Perceptual Theories of Emotion: A Representational Proposal.Louis C. Charland - 1997 - Philosophy of Science 64 (4):555-579.
    The distinction between cognitive and perceptual theories of emotion is entrenched in the literature on emotion and is openly used by individual emotion theorists when classifying their own theories and those of others. In this paper, I argue that the distinction between cognitive and perceptual theories of emotion is more pernicious than it is helpful, while at the same time insisting that there are nonetheless important perceptual and cognitive factors in emotion that need to be distinguished. A general representational metatheoretical (...)
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  6. Feeling and Representing: Computational Theory and the Modularity of Affect.Louis C. Charland - 1995 - Synthese 105 (3):273-301.
    In this paper I review some leading developments in the empirical theory of affect. I argue that (1) affect is a distinct perceptual representation governed system, and (2) that there are significant modular factors in affect. The paper concludes with the observation thatfeeler (affective perceptual system) may be a natural kind within cognitive science. The main purpose of the paper is to explore some hitherto unappreciated connections between the theory of affect and the computational theory of mind.
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  7.  63
    Appreciation and Emotion: Theoretical Reflections on the Macarthur Treatment Competence Study.Louis C. Charland - 1998 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 8 (4):359-376.
    When emotions are mentioned in the literature on mental competence, it is generally because they are thought to influence competence negatively; that is, they are thought to impede or compromise the cognitive capacities that are taken to underlie competence. The purpose of the present discussion is to explore the possibility that emotions might play a more positive role in the determination of competence. Using the MacArthur Treatment Competence Study as an example, it is argued that appreciation, a central theoretical concept (...)
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  8.  80
    Anorexia Nervosa as a Passion.Louis C. Charland, Tony Hope, Anne Stewart & Jacinta Tan - 2013 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 20 (4):353-365.
    Contemporary diagnostic criteria for anorexia nervosa explicitly refer to affective states of fear and anxiety regarding weight gain, as well as a fixed and very strong attachment to the pursuit of thinness as an overarching personal goal. Yet current treatments for that condition often have a decidedly cognitive orientation and the exact nature of the contribution of affective states and processes to anorexia nervosa remains largely uncharted theoretically. Taking our inspiration from the history of psychiatry, we argue that conceptualizing anorexia (...)
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  9.  95
    Review of "Strong Feelings: Emotion, Addiction and Human Behavior" by Jon Elster. [REVIEW]Louis C. Charland - 2001 - Philosophical Review 110 (1):108.
    The Diagnostic Statistical Manual of the American Psychiatric Association defines substance dependence, more commonly known as “drug addiction,” as “a cluster of cognitive, behavioral, and physiological symptoms indicating that the individual continues use of the substance despite significant substance-related problems. There is a pattern of repeated self-administration that usually results in tolerance, withdrawal, and compulsive drug-taking behavior.” If drug addiction is a matter of compulsion, as this definition suggests, then is it correct to say that a drug addict chooses to (...)
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  10.  72
    Emotion as a Natural Kind: Towards a Computational Foundation for Emotion Theory.Louis C. Charland - 1995 - Philosophical Psychology 8 (1):59-84.
    In this paper I link two hitherto disconnected sets of results in the philosophy of emotions and explore their implications for the computational theory of mind. The argument of the paper is that, for just the same reasons that some computationalists have thought that cognition may be a natural kind, so the same can plausibly be argued of emotion. The core of the argument is that emotions are a representation-governed phenomenon and that the explanation of how they figure in behaviour (...)
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  11. The Heat of Emotion: Valence and the Demarcation Problem.Louis Charland - 2005 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (8-10):82-102.
    Philosophical discussions regarding the status of emotion as a scientific domain usually get framed in terms of the question whether emotion is a natural kind. That approach to the issues is wrongheaded for two reasons. First, it has led to an intractable philosophical impasse that ultimately misconstrues the character of the relevant debate in emotion science. Second, and most important, it entirely ignores valence, a central feature of emotion experience, and probably the most promising criterion for demarcating emotion from cognition (...)
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  12.  16
    Decision-Making Capacity to Consent to Medical Assistance in Dying for Persons with Mental Disorders.Louis C. Charland, Trudo Lemmens & Kyoko Wada - 2016 - Journal of Ethics in Mental Health:1-14.
    Following a Canadian Supreme Court ruling invalidating an absolute prohibition on physician assisted dying, two reports and several commentators have recommended that the Canadian criminal law allow medical assistance in dying (MAID) for persons with a diagnosis of mental disorder. A key element in this process is that the person requesting MAID be deemed to have the ‘mental capacity’ or ‘mental competence’ to consent to that option. In this context, mental capacity and mental competence refer to ‘decision-making capacity’, which is (...)
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  13.  55
    The Varieties of Compulsion in Addiction.Louis C. Charland - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 2 (2):50-51.
    The target of Hanna Pickard's very erudite and thought-provoking article is compulsion. She argues that “addiction is not a form of compulsion” and that “addictive desires are not irresistible” (Pickard 2012, 40). However, I fear that compulsion as she presents it is ultimately a metaphysical straw figure, trapped in a false metaphysical dichotomy. What is lacking is a proper attention to specific individual clinical cases, examined over time. At the same time, Pickard's discussion is extremely important because of the manner (...)
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  14.  55
    Anorexia and the MacCAT-T Test for Mental Competence: Validity, Value, and Emotion.Louis C. Charland - 2007 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 13 (4):283-287.
  15.  15
    Ethical and Conceptual Issues in Eating Disorders.Louis C. Charland - 2013 - Current Opinion in Psychiatry 26 (6):562-565.
    Purpose of review This review considers the literature on ethical and conceptual issues in eating disorders from the last 18 months. Some reference to earlier work is necessary in order to provide context for the recent findings from research that is ongoing. -/- Recent findings Empirical ethics research on anorexia nervosa includes novel ethical and conceptual findings on the role of authenticity and personal identity in individuals’ reports of their experience, as well as new evidence on the role of affective (...)
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  16.  52
    Character: Moral Treatment and the Personality Disorders.Louis Charland - 2004 - In Jennifer Radden (ed.), The Philosophy of Psychiatry: A Companion. Oxford: Oup Usa. pp. 64-77.
    This chapter argues that the conditions under the umbrella “personality disorders” actually constitute two very different kinds of theoretical entities. In particular, several core personality disorders are actually moral, and not medical, conditions. Thus, the categories that are held to represent them are really moral, and not medical, theoretical kinds. The chapter works back from the possibility of treatment to the nature of the kinds that are allegedly treated, revisiting 18th-century ideas of moral treatment along the way. The discussion closes (...)
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  17.  44
    Anorexia and the MacCAT-T Test for Mental Competence: Validity, Value, and Emotion.Louis C. Charland - 2007 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, & Psychology 13 (4):283-287.
    How does one scientifically verify a psychometric instrument designed to assess the mental competence of medical patients who are asked to consent to medical treatment? Aside from satisfying technical requirements like statistical reliability, results yielded by such a test must conform to at least some accepted pretheoretical desiderata; for example, determinations of competence, as measured by the test, must capture a minimal core of accepted basic intuitions about what competence means and what a theory of competence is supposed to do. (...)
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  18.  12
    Mental Competence and Value: The Problem of Normativity in the Assessment of Decision-Making Capacity.Louis C. Charland - 2001 - Psychiatry, Psychology and Law 8 (2):135-145.
    Mental competence, or decision‐making capacity, is an important concept in law, psychiatry, and bioethics. A major problem faced in the development and implementation of standards for assessing mental competence is the issue of objectivity. The problem is that objective standards are hard to formulate and apply. The aim here is to review the limited philosophical literature on the place of value in competence in an attempt to introduce the issues to a wider audience. The thesis that the assessment of competence (...)
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  19.  97
    Why Psychiatry Should Fear Medicalisation.Louis C. Charland - 2013 - In K. W. M. Fulford, Davies M., Gipps R., Graham G., Sadler J., Stanghellini G. & Thornton T. (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Psychiatry. Oxford University Press. pp. 159-175.
    Medicalization in contemporary psychopharmacology is increasingly dominated by commercial interests that threaten the scientific and ethical integrity of psychiatry. At the same time, the proliferation of new social media has altered the manner in which the social groups and institutions that have stakes in medicalization interact. Consumers are at once more powerful than ever before, but also more vulnerable. The upshot of all these developments is that medicalization is no longer simply the professed enemy of anti-psychiatry and its supporters. It (...)
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  20.  9
    Decisional Capacity and Responsibility in Addiction.Louis C. Charland - 2011 - In Jeffrey Poland & George Graham (eds.), Addiction and Responsibility. Cambridge, MA, USA: pp. 139-159.
    Addiction of the variety discussed in this chapter, is a condition that by its very nature compromises decision-making capacity across the decisional spectrum. The impairment is present not only at moments of withdrawal and intoxication, but at all stages of the active addictive cycle, as long as the pathological dispositions to overvalue addictive drugs remain entrenched and operative. In light of this entrenched and pervasive reorientation in pathological values, it seems reasonable to question the unilateral presumption of capacity for cases (...)
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  21.  48
    Is Mr. Spock Mentally Competent? Competence to Consent and Emotion.Louis C. Charland - 1998 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 5 (1):67-81.
    Most contemporary models and tests for mental competence do not make adequate provision for the positive influence of emotion in the determination of competence. This most likely is due to a reliance on an outdated view of emotion according to which these models are essentially noncognitive. Leading developments in modern emotion theory indicate that this noncognitive theory of emotion is no longer tenable. Emotions, in fact, are essentially representational in a manner that makes them “cognitive” in an important sense. This (...)
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  22.  13
    Moral Treatment and the Personality Disorders.Louis C. Charland - 2004 - In Jennifer Radden (ed.), The Philosophy of Psychiatry: A Companion. Oxford, UK: pp. 64-77.
    This chapter argues that the conditions under the umbrella “personality disorders” actually constitute two very different kinds of theoretical entities. In particular, several core personality disorders are actually moral, and not medical, conditions. Thus, the categories that are held to represent them are really moral, and not medical, theoretical kinds. The chapter works back from the possibility of treatment to the nature of the kinds that are allegedly treated, revisiting 18th-century ideas of moral treatment along the way. The discussion closes (...)
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  23. Mental Competence and Value: The Problem of Normativity in the Assessment of Decision-Making Capacity.Louis C. Charland - 2004 - In Françoise Baylis, Jocelyn Downie, Barry Hoffmaster & Susan Sherwin (eds.), Health Care Ethics in Canada. Toronto, ON, Canada: pp. 267-278.
     
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  24.  63
    Moral Nature of the Dsm-IV Cluster B Personality Disorders.Louis Charland - 2006 - Journal of Personality Disorders 20 (2):116-125.
    Moral considerations do not appear to play a large role in discussions of the DSM-IV personality disorders and debates about their empirical validity. Yet philosophical analysis reveals that the Cluster B personality disorders, in particular, may in fact be moral rather than clinical conditions. This finding has serious consequences for how they should be treated and by whom.
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  25. Reinstating the Passions: Arguments From History of Psychopathology.Louis C. Charland - 2009 - In Peter Goldie (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Emotion. Oxford University Press.
  26.  37
    Competence and Inequity Are Both Important to the Ethics of Supervised Injectable Opioid Assisted Treatment.Louis Christian Charland - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (12):41-43.
    I very much enjoyed reading the interesting and original article by Steel and colleagues (2017). But I found myself strongly disagreeing with its conclusion once the real point of the argument became clear to me. At the same time, I believe that the authors are correct to draw attention to the importance of context and inequities in framing discussions of the ethics of voluntary consent in heroin prescription research. I begin with a brief summary of the authors’ conclusion, quoting directly (...)
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  27.  37
    Moral Undertow and the Passions: Two Challenges for Contemporary Emotion Regulation.Louis C. Charland - 2011 - Emotion Review 3 (1):83-91.
    The history and philosophy of affective terms and concepts contains important challenges for contemporary scientific accounts of emotion regulation. First, there is the problem of moral undertow. This arises because stipulating the ends of emotion regulation requires normative assumptions that ultimately derive from values and morals. Some historical precedents are considered to help explain and address this problem. Second, there is the problem of organization. This arises because multiple emotions are often organized and oriented in very particular ways over the (...)
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  28.  39
    Emotion Experience and the Indeterminacy of Valence.Louis C. Charland - 2005 - In Lisa Feldman Barrett, Paula M. Niedenthal & Piotr Winkielman (eds.), Emotion and Consciousness. Guilford Press. pp. 231-254.
  29.  24
    Can Women in Labor Give Informed Consent to Epidural Analgesia?Kyoko Wada, Louis C. Charland & Geoff Bellingham - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (4):475-486.
    There are reasons to believe that decision‐making capacity (mental competence) of women in labor may be compromised in relation to giving informed consent to epidural analgesia. Not only severe labor pain, but also stress, anxiety, and premedication of analgesics such as opioids, may influence women’s decisional capacity. Decision‐making capacity is a complex construct involving cognitive and emotional components which cannot be reduced to ‘understanding’ alone. A systematic literature search identified a total of 20 empirical studies focused on women’s decision‐making about (...)
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  30.  70
    Affective Neuroscience and Addiction.Louis C. Charland - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (1):20-21.
    The author comments on the article “The neurobiology of addiction: Implications for voluntary control of behavior,‘ by S. E. Hyman. Hyman suggests that addicted individuals have substantial impairments in cognitive control of behavior. The author states that brain and neurochemical systems are involved in addiction. He also suggests that neuroscience can link the diseased brain processes in addiction to the moral struggles of the addicts.
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  31. Science and Morals in the Affective Psychopathology of Philippe Pinel.Louis C. Charland - 2010 - History of Psychiatry 21 (1):38-51.
    Building on what he believed was a new ‘medico-philosophical’ method, Philippe Pinel made a bold theoretical attempt to find a place for the passions and other affective posits in psychopathology. However, his courageous attempt to steer affectivity onto the high seas of medical science ran aground on two great reefs that still threaten the scientific status of affectivity today. Epistemologically, there is the elusive nature of the signs and symptoms of affectivity. Ethically, there is the stubborn manner in which fact (...)
     
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  32. A Madness for Identity: Psychiatric Labels, Consumer Autonomy, and the Perils of the Internet.Louis C. Charland - 2004 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 11 (4):335-349.
    Psychiatric labeling has been the subject of considerable ethical debate. Much of it has centered on issues associated with the application of psychiatric labels. In comparison, far less attention has been paid to issues associated with the removal of psychiatric labels. Ethical problems of this last sort tend to revolve around identity. Many sufferers are reticent to relinquish their iatrogenic identity in the face of official label change; some actively resist it. New forms of this resistance are taking place in (...)
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  33. Descartes on Émotion.Louis C. Charland - forthcoming - Emotion: History, Culture, Society.
    The primary aim of this discussion is to present a detailed case study of Descartes’ use of émotion in Les passions de l’ame and in his early writings leading up to that work. A secondary aim is to argue that while Descartes was innovative in suggesting that émotion might be a better keyword for the affective sciences than passion, he did not consistently follow his own advice. His innovation therefore failed in that regard, even though it did inspire later thinkers (...)
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  34.  60
    Medical or Moral Kinds? Moving Beyond a False Dichotomy.Louis C. Charland - 2010 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 17 (2):119-125.
    I am delighted that Zachar and Potter have chosen to refer to my work on the DSM-IV cluster B personality disorders in their very interesting and ambitious target article. Their suggestion that we turn to virtue ethics rather than traditional moral theory to understand the relation between moral and nonmoral factors in personality disorders is certainly original and worth pursuing. Yet, in the final instance, I am not entirely sure about the exact scope of their proposed analysis. I also worry (...)
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  35.  5
    Passion and Decision-Making Capacity in Anorexia Nervosa.Louis C. Charland - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 6 (4):66-68.
    The question of decision-making capacity for informed consent to experimental brain surgery for severely ill anorectic patients is about as dramatic an ethical issue one can imagine. Sabine Muller and her co-authors (2015) should be commended for this extremely timely and original clinical and ethical discussion of decision-making capacity in relation to the issues raised by informed consent to such therapies. In this commentary, I elaborate on the new account of the nature of anorexia nervosa that the authors allude to (...)
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  36.  8
    John Locke on Madness: Redressing the Intellectualist Bias.Louis C. Charland - 2014 - History of Psychiatry 25 (2):137-153.
    Locke is famous for defining madness as an intellectual disorder in the realm of ideas. Numerous commentators take this to be his main and only contribution to the history of psychiatry. However, a detailed exegetical review of all the relevant textual evidence suggests that this intellectualist interpretation of Locke’s account of madness is both misleading and incomplete. Affective states of various sorts play an important role in that account and are in fact primordial in the determination of human conduct generally. (...)
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  37.  47
    In Defence of “Emotion”. [REVIEW]Louis C. Charland - 2001 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 31 (1):133-154.
  38.  3
    By What Authority? Conflicts of Interest in Professional Ethics.Louis Charland - 2008 - Journal of Ethics in Mental Health 3 (2):1-3.
    Paradoxically, the profession whose primary mandate is to instruct and comment on matters of ethics spends inordinately little time reflecting on its own ethical practices. Consider the fact that while professional ethicists of all stripes crusade to expose and denounce conflicts of interests in all other branches of the health care system, they typically fail to pay much attention to their own potential ‘ethical’ conflicts of interest. Admittedly, there have been some efforts to address the problem. However, despite laudable intentions, (...)
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  39. Benevolent Theory: Moral Treatment at the York Retreat.Louis C. Charland - 2007 - History of Psychiatry 18 (1):61-80.
    The York Retreat is famous in the histor y of nineteenth-centur y psychiatr y because of its association with moral treatment. Although there exists a substantial historical literature on the evolution of moral treatment at the Retreat, several interpretive problems continue to obscure its unique therapeutic legacy. The nature of moral treatment as practised at the Retreat will be clarified and discussed in a historical perspective. It will be argued that moral treatment at the Retreat was pr imar ily a (...)
     
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  40. Psychiatric Ethics: A History.Louis C. Charland - forthcoming - In Psychiatric Ethics 5th Edition. New York, NY, USA:
    The chapter traces the history of psychiatric ethics with a focus on the emergence of autonomy and how assumptions and thresholds surrounding informed consent and decision-making capacity have changed over the centuries. Innovators like Philippe PInel and William Tuke are featured in this account of how the 'mad' and the abuses of the 'domestication paradigm' of madness eventually gave way to more humanitarian approaches of treating the 'mad', like moral treatment. The chapter closes with a brief reflection regarding the limits (...)
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  41.  12
    A Moral Line in the Sand: Alexander Crichton and Philippe Pinel on the Psychopathology of the Passions.Louis C. Charland - 2008 - In Louis C. Charland & Peter Zachar (eds.), Fact and Value in Emotion. Amsterdam, Netherlands: pp. 15-35.
    Psychopathology is the science of what mental illnesses are. Affective psychopathology – or, alternately, the ‘psychopathology of affectivity’ – is the branch of psychopathology devoted to the study of mental disorders that implicate mental states associated with moods and emotions and what used to be called ‘passions’. Some segments of the history of affective psychopathology have been skillfully traced. However, there is one episode in that history that has not received the attention it deserves. It concerns medical writers in France, (...)
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  42. Philippe Pinel (1745-1826).Louis C. Charland - 2015 - In Robin L. Cautin & Scott O. Lilienfeld (eds.), The Encyclopedia of Clinical Psychology. New York, NY, USA:
    Philippe Pinel (1745–1826) is often said to be the father of modern clinical psychiatry. He is most famous for being a committed pioneer and advocate of humanitarian methods in the treatment of the mentally ill, and for the development of a mode of psychological therapy known as moral treatment. Pinel also made important contributions to nosology and the diagnosis and treatment of mental disorder, especially the psychopathology of affectivity, stressing the role of the passions in mental disorder. Pinel also conducted (...)
     
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  43. A Puzzling Anomaly: Decision-Making Capacity and Research on Addiction.Louis C. Charland - 2020 - Oxford Handbook of Research Ethics.
    Any ethical inquiry into addiction research is faced with the preliminary challenge that the term “addiction” is itself a matter of scientific and ethical controversy. Accordingly, the chapter begins with a brief history of the term “addiction.” The chapter then turns to ethical issues surrounding consent and decision-making capacity viewed from the perspective of the current opioid epidemic. One concern is the neglect of the cyclical nature of addiction and the implications of this for the validity of current psychometric instruments (...)
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  44.  23
    In Defence of “Emotion”: Critical Notice.Louis C. Charland - 2001 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 31 (1):113-154.
  45.  15
    In Defence of Emotion: Critical Notice of Paul E. Griffiths's What Emotions Really Are: The Problem of Psychological Categories.Louis C. Charland - 2001 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 31 (1):133-154.
  46.  23
    Are There Answers?Louis C. Charland - 2003 - American Journal of Bioethics 3 (3):1-2.
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  47.  34
    La psychopathologie et le statut d’espèce naturelle de l’émotion.Louis C. Charland - 2006 - Philosophiques 33 (1):217-230.
    La thérapie rationnelle des émotions est basée sur l’hypothèse qu’un trouble de la pensée conduit à des troubles du sentiment qui eux-mêmes conduisent à des troubles de comportement. Du point de vue thérapeutique, la stratégie consiste à corriger les sentiments et le comportement en modifiant le trouble de raisonnement. Cette forme très en vogue de psychothérapie des troubles émotionnels fournit une illustration intéressante des relations nomologiques intriquées qui peuvent exister entre les patrons relativement fixes d’états émotionnels, d’états comportementaux et d’états (...)
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  48. Alexander Crichton on the Psychopathology of the Passions.Louis C. Charland - 2008 - History of Psychiatry 19 (3):275-296.
    Alexander Crichton (1763—1856) made significant contributions to the medical theory of the passions, yet there exists no systematic exegesis of this particular aspect of his work. The present article explores four themes in Crichton's work on the passions: (1) the role of irritability in the physiology of the passions; (2) the manner in which irritability and sensibility contribute to the valence, or polarity, of the passions; (3) the elaboration of a psychopathology of the passions that emphasizes their physiological form rather (...)
     
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  49.  27
    The Hypothesis That Anorexia Nervosa Is a Passion: Clarifications and Elaborations.Louis C. Charland, Tony Hope, Anne Stewart & Jacinta Tan - 2013 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 20 (4):375-379.
    We are grateful for these two insightful commentaries, which both see novelty and value in the manner in which we invoke the hypothesis that anorexia nervosa is a passion, to help explain data from the Anorexia Experiences Study, which provides the basis of our inquiry. In this response, we wish to clarify and elaborate on our hypothesis; in particular, the difference between passions and moods, the manner in which our hypothesis touches on issues of authenticity and identity, and the compelling (...)
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  50. Consent or Coercion? Treatment Referrals to Alcoholics Anonymous.Louis C. Charland - 2007 - Journal of Ethics in Mental Health 2 (1):1-3.
    Clinton is certainly correct that there can be serious ethical problems with mental health professionals referring clients with substance dependence and other addictionrelated problems to 12-step programs. But the philosophical doctrine of representationalism he proposes is not a helpful way to address those issues. It seems more like red herring that only serves to detract attention from the real problem. This is the coercive nature of referrals to 12-step programs in many treatment and rehabilitation centres. Clinton’s discussion is helpful because (...)
     
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