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  1.  45
    Madness and modernism: insanity in the light of modern art, literature, and thought.Louis Arnorsson Sass - 1992 - Harvard University Press.
    Madness and Modernism provides a phenomenological study of schizophrenic disorders, criticizing some standard conceptions of these disorders. Sass argues that many aspects of this group of disorders can actually involve more sophisticated (albeit dysfunctional) forms of mind and experience.
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  2. Self, solipsism, and schizophrenic delusions.Josef Parnas & Louis Arnorsson Sass - 2001 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 8 (2-3):101-120.
    We propose that typical schizophrenic delusions develop on the background of preexisting anomalies of self-experience. We argue that disorders of the Self represent the experiential core clinical phenomena of schizophrenia, as was already suggested by the founders of the concept of schizophrenia and elaborated in the phenomenological psychiatric tradition. The article provides detailed descriptions of the pre-psychotic or schizotypal anomalies of self-experience, often illustrated through clinical vignettes. We argue that delusional transformation in the evolution of schizophrenic psychosis reflects a global (...)
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  3. Self and World in Schizophrenia: Three Classic Approaches.Louis Arnorsson Sass - 2001 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 8 (4):251-270.
    This article presents an introductory overview of the interpretations of schizophrenia offered by three phenomenological psychiatrists: Eugene Minkowski (1885-1972), Wolfgang Blankenburg (b. 1928), and Kimura Bin (b. 1931). Minkowski views schizophrenia as characterized by a diminished sense of dynamic and vital connection to the world ("loss of vital contact"), often accompanied by a hypertrophy of intellectual and static tendencies ("morbid rationalism," "morbid geometrism"). Blankenburg emphasizes the patient's loss of the normal sense of obviousness or "natural self-evidence"—a loss of the usual (...)
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  4. Some Reflections on the (Analytic) Philosophical Approach to Delusion.Louis Arnorsson Sass - 2004 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 11 (1):71-80.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Philosophy, Psychiatry, & Psychology 11.1 (2004) 71-80 [Access article in PDF] Some Reflections on the (Analytic) Philosophical Approach to Delusion Louis A. Sass There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, Than are dreamt of in your philosophy." —Hamlet, Act I, Scene 5 The peculiar, often problematic phenome na of psychopathology have been attract ing the attention of analytic philosophers in recent years. The topic of delusion has (...)
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  5. Incomprehensibility and Understanding: On the Interpretation of Severe Mental Illness.Louis Arnorsson Sass - 2003 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 10 (2):125-132.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Philosophy, Psychiatry, & Psychology 10.2 (2003) 125-132 [Access article in PDF] Incomprehensibility and Understanding:On the Interpretation of Severe Mental Illness Louis A. Sass Keywords hermeneutics, psychopathology, paradox, Wittgenstein, solipsism, delusion, principle of charity, phenomenological psychopathology. I would like to begin by thanking Rupert Read for the care he has put into reading my work, and into thinking through its implications in the context of the "new-Wittgensteinian" interpretation of the (...)
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  6. Phenomenology of self-disturbances in schizophrenia: Some research findings and directions.Louis Arnorsson Sass & Josef Parnas - 2001 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 8 (4):347-356.
    Phenomenological psychiatry has suffered from a failure to translate its insights into terms specific enough to be applied to psychiatric diagnosis or to be used in contemporary research programs. This difficulty can be understood in light of the well-known tradeoff between reliability and validity. We argue, however, that with sufficient ingenuity, phenomenological concepts can be adapted and applied in a research context. Elsewhere, we have described a phenomenologically oriented conception of schizophrenia as a self- or ipseity-disorder with two main facets: (...)
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  7.  19
    Pathogenesis, Common Sense, and the Cultural Framework: A Commentary on Stanghellini.Louis Arnorsson Sass - 2001 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 8 (2):219-224.