7 found
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  1.  36
    Category Contingent Aftereffects for Faces of Different Races, Ages and Species.Anthony C. Little, Lisa M. DeBruine, Benedict C. Jones & Corri Waitt - 2008 - Cognition 106 (3):1537-1547.
  2.  29
    Auditory Adaptation in Vocal Affect Perception.Patricia E. G. Bestelmeyer, Julien Rouger, Lisa M. DeBruine & Pascal Belin - 2010 - Cognition 117 (2):217-223.
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  3.  5
    Ovulation, Sex Hormones, and Women’s Mating Psychology.Benedict C. Jones, Amanda C. Hahn & Lisa M. DeBruine - 2019 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 23 (1):51-62.
  4.  24
    Adaptation to Antifaces and the Perception of Correct Famous Identity in an Average Face.Anthony C. Little, Peter J. B. Hancock, Lisa M. DeBruine & Benedict C. Jones - 2012 - Frontiers in Psychology 3.
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  5.  13
    What's a Face Worth: Noneconomic Factors in Game Playing.Peter J. B. Hancock & Lisa M. DeBruine - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (2):162-163.
    Where behavior defies economic analysis, one explanation is that individuals consider more than the immediate payoff. We present evidence that noneconomic factors influence behavior. Attractiveness influences offers in the Ultimatum and Dictator Games. Facial resemblance, a cue of relatedness, increases trusting in a two-node trust game. Only by considering the range of possible influences will game-playing behavior be explained.
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  6.  20
    Category-Contingent Face Adaptation for Novel Colour Categories: Contingent Effects Are Seen Only After Social or Meaningful Labelling.Anthony C. Little, Lisa M. DeBruine & Benedict C. Jones - 2011 - Cognition 118 (1):116-122.
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  7.  13
    Extending Parasite-Stress Theory to Variation in Human Mate Preferences.Lisa M. DeBruine, Anthony C. Little & Benedict C. Jones - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (2):86-87.
    In this commentary we suggest that Fincher & Thornhill's (F&T's) parasite-stress theory of social behaviors and attitudes can be extended to mating behaviors and preferences. We discuss evidence from prior correlational and experimental studies that support this claim. We also reanalyze data from two of those studies using F&T's new parasite stress measures.
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