Results for 'Lisa E. Stewart'

983 found
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  1. Pushing moral buttons: The interaction between personal force and intention in moral judgment.Joshua D. Greene, Fiery A. Cushman, Lisa E. Stewart, Kelly Lowenberg, Leigh E. Nystrom & Jonathan D. Cohen - 2009 - Cognition 111 (3):364-371.
    In some cases people judge it morally acceptable to sacrifice one person’s life in order to save several other lives, while in other similar cases they make the opposite judgment. Researchers have identified two general factors that may explain this phenomenon at the stimulus level: (1) the agent’s intention (i.e. whether the harmful event is intended as a means or merely foreseen as a side-effect) and (2) whether the agent harms the victim in a manner that is relatively “direct” or (...)
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  2. The Evolutionary Manifesto.John E. Stewart - 2008 - Evolutionary Manifesto.
    The Evolutionary Manifesto shows that evolution is directional and demonstrates that this has major implications for humanity. The Manifesto shows that humanity must align its social systems and behaviour with the trajectory of evolution if we are to survive and thrive into the future. The Manifesto goes on to demonstrate that humanity has an essential role to play in the future evolution of life on this planet. It demonstrates that life on Earth has reached a critical stage in evolution’s trajectory. (...)
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  3. The Origins of Life: The Managed-Metabolism Hypothesis.John E. Stewart - 2018 - Foundations of Science:1-25.
    The ‘managed-metabolism’ hypothesis suggests that a ‘cooperation barrier’ must be overcome if self-producing chemical organizations are to undergo the transition from non-life to life. This dynamical barrier prevents un-managed autocatalytic networks of molecular species from individuating into complex, cooperative organizations. The barrier arises because molecular species that could otherwise make significant cooperative contributions to the success of an organization will often not be supported within the organization, and because side reactions and other ‘free-riding’ processes will undermine cooperation. As a result, (...)
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  4. Evolution's Arrow: the direction of evolution and the future of humanity.John E. Stewart - 2000 - Canberra: The Chapman Press.
    Evolution's Arrow argues that evolution is directional and progressive, and that this has major consequences for humanity. Without resort to teleology, the book demonstrates that evolution moves in the direction of producing cooperative organisations of greater scale and evolvability - evolution has organised molecular processes into cells, cells into organisms, and organisms into societies. The book founds this position on a new theory of the evolution of cooperation. It shows that self-interest at the level of the genes does not prevent (...)
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  5.  38
    Mourning Nature: Hope at the Heart of Ecological Grief and Loss ed. by Ashlee Cunsolo and Karen Landman.Alan E. Stewart - 2018 - Ethics and the Environment 23 (1):79-86.
    If C.S. Lewis' A Grief Observed can be considered an account of a lost human relationship, then Cunsolo and Landman's Mourning Nature forms a posthuman, but nonetheless personal, examination of the losses of relationships with plants, animals, and even entire ecosystems—an ecological grief observed. In this regard, one of the motivations for this book was Cunsolo's interviews with Inuit residents who experienced profound sadness and despair at the changes in the landscape brought by climate change. Beyond this, each of the (...)
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  6.  19
    The Origins of Life: The Managed-Metabolism Hypothesis.John E. Stewart - 2019 - Foundations of Science 24 (1):171-195.
    The ‘managed-metabolism’ hypothesis suggests that a ‘cooperation barrier’ must be overcome if self-producing chemical organizations are to undergo the transition from non-life to life. This dynamical barrier prevents un-managed autocatalytic networks of molecular species from individuating into complex, cooperative organizations. The barrier arises because molecular species that could otherwise make significant cooperative contributions to the success of an organization will often not be supported within the organization, and because side reactions and other ‘free-riding’ processes will undermine cooperation. As a result, (...)
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  7. Evolutionary possibilities: Can a society be constrained so that “the good” self-organizes?John E. Stewart - 2018 - World Futures 74 (1):1-35.
    Can a human society be constrained in such a way that self-organization will thereafter tend to produce outcomes that advance the goals of the society? Such a society would be self-organizing in the sense that individuals who pursue only their own interests would none-the-less act in the interests of the society as a whole, irrespective of any intention to do so. The paper sketches an agent-based model that identifies the conditions that must be met if such a self-organizing society is (...)
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  8. Justice human and divine: Ethics in Margaret Frazer's Medievalist Dame frevisee series.Lisa Hicks & Lesley E. Jacobs - 2014 - In Karl Fugelso (ed.), Ethics and Medievalism. Cambridge, UK: D.S. Brewer.
     
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  9.  22
    Distorted Beliefs about Luck and Skill and Their Relation to Gambling Problems and Gambling Behavior in Dutch Gamblers.Megan E. Cowie, Sherry H. Stewart, Joshua Salmon, Pam Collins, Mohammed Al-Hamdani, Marilisa Boffo, Elske Salemink, David de Jong, Ruby Smits & Reinout W. Wiers - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  10.  6
    Book Review: Nature and Experience in the Culture of Delusion: How Industrial Society Lost Touch with Reality. [REVIEW]Alan E. Stewart - 2013 - Environmental Values 22 (5):679-681.
  11.  17
    As the crones fly.Georgina Tuari Stewart, Nesta Devine, Chris Jenkin, Yo Heta-Lensen, Lisa Maurice-Takerei, Margaret Joan Stuart & Sue Middleton - 2024 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 56 (6):513-526.
    Catalysed by conversations amongst a group of colleagues, this article is an initial exploration of what happens to women academics aged 60+ who work in a university in Aotearoa New Zealand. This work is an example of when academic theories, in this case feminism, are called forth by real-world experiences – in this case, increasing academic job insecurity, catalysed by post-pandemic economic shortfalls. We blend together personal anecdotes and feminist analysis to show how women’s academic careers, which are commonly constrained (...)
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  12.  96
    Book Review: The Pastor: A Spirituality. [REVIEW]Lisa E. Dahill - 2007 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 61 (3):345-346.
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  13. The Philosophy of Paul Ricœr an Anthology of His Work.Paul Ricœr, Charles E. Reagan & David Stewart - 1978
     
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  14.  21
    Hostage to Fortune: The Troubled Life of Francis Bacon.Lisa Jardine & Alan Stewart - 2000 - Hill & Wang.
    The statesman, scientist, and philosopher Francis Bacon (1561-1626) lived a divided life. Was he a noble scholar, or a conniving political crook? Was he a homosexual? Lisa Jardine and Alan Stewart draw upon previously untapped sources to create a controversial nuanced portrait of the quintessential "Renaissance man", one whose achievements, while enormous, were nonetheless sadly circumscribed by his class and station.
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  15.  13
    European and American Philosophers.John Marenbon, Douglas Kellner, Richard D. Parry, Gregory Schufreider, Ralph McInerny, Andrea Nye, R. M. Dancy, Vernon J. Bourke, A. A. Long, James F. Harris, Thomas Oberdan, Paul S. MacDonald, Véronique M. Fóti, F. Rosen, James Dye, Pete A. Y. Gunter, Lisa J. Downing, W. J. Mander, Peter Simons, Maurice Friedman, Robert C. Solomon, Nigel Love, Mary Pickering, Andrew Reck, Simon J. Evnine, Iakovos Vasiliou, John C. Coker, Georges Dicker, James Gouinlock, Paul J. Welty, Gianluigi Oliveri, Jack Zupko, Tom Rockmore, Wayne M. Martin, Ladelle McWhorter, Hans-Johann Glock, Georgia Warnke, John Haldane, Joseph S. Ullian, Steven Rieber, David Ingram, Nick Fotion, George Rainbolt, Thomas Sheehan, Gerald J. Massey, Barbara D. Massey, David E. Cooper, David Gauthier, James M. Humber, J. N. Mohanty, Michael H. Dearmey, Oswald O. Schrag, Ralf Meerbote, George J. Stack, John P. Burgess, Paul Hoyningen-Huene, Nicholas Jolley, Adriaan T. Peperzak, E. J. Lowe, William D. Richardson, Stephen Mulhall & C. - 2017 - In Robert L. Arrington (ed.), A Companion to the Philosophers. Oxford, UK: Blackwell. pp. 109–557.
    Peter Abelard (1079–1142 ce) was the most wide‐ranging philosopher of the twelfth century. He quickly established himself as a leading teacher of logic in and near Paris shortly after 1100. After his affair with Heloise, and his subsequent castration, Abelard became a monk, but he returned to teaching in the Paris schools until 1140, when his work was condemned by a Church Council at Sens. His logical writings were based around discussion of the “Old Logic”: Porphyry's Isagoge, aristotle'S Categories and (...)
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  16.  12
    Better Mechanisms Are Needed to Oversee HREC Reviews.Lisa Eckstein, Rebekah McWhirter & Cameron Stewart - 2022 - Public Health Ethics 15 (2):200-203.
    Hawe et al. raise concerns about Human Research Ethics Committees (HRECs) taking a risk-averse and litigation-sensitive approach to ethical review of research proposals. HRECs are tasked with reviewing proposals for compliance with the National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Human Research for the purpose of promoting the welfare of participants. While these guidelines intentionally include a significant degree of discretion in HREC decision making, there is also evidence that HRECs sometimes request changes that go beyond the guidance provided by the (...)
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  17. How Much Ambiguity Aversion? Finding Indifferences between Ellsberg's Risky and Ambiguous Bets.Ken Binmore, Lisa Stewart & Alex Voorhoeve - 2012 - Journal of Risk and Uncertainty 45 (3):215-38.
    Experimental results on the Ellsberg paradox typically reveal behavior that is commonly interpreted as ambiguity aversion. The experiments reported in the current paper find the objective probabilities for drawing a red ball that make subjects indifferent between various risky and uncertain Ellsberg bets. They allow us to examine the predictive power of alternative principles of choice under uncertainty, including the objective maximin and Hurwicz criteria, the sure-thing principle, and the principle of insufficient reason. Contrary to our expectations, the principle of (...)
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  18.  29
    Public trust and global biobank networks.Wendy Lipworth, Ian Kerridge, Cameron Stewart, Edwina Light, Miriam Wiersma, Paul Mason, Margaret Otlowski, Christine Critchley & Lisa Dive - 2020 - BMC Medical Ethics 21 (1):1-9.
    BackgroundBiobanks provide an important foundation for genomic and personalised medicine. In order to enhance their scientific power and scope, they are increasingly becoming part of national or international networks. Public trust is essential in fostering public engagement, encouraging donation to, and facilitating public funding for biobanks. Globalisation and networking of biobanking may challenge this trust.MethodsWe report the results of an Australian study examining public attitudes to the networking and globalisation of biobanks. The study used quantitative and qualitative methods in conjunction (...)
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  19. ‘Faultless’ ignorance: Strengths and limitations of epistemic definitions of confabulation.Lisa Bortolotti & Rochelle E. Cox - 2009 - Consciousness and Cognition 18 (4):952-965.
    There is no satisfactory account for the general phenomenon of confabulation, for the following reasons: (1) confabulation occurs in a number of pathological and non-pathological conditions; (2) impairments giving rise to confabulation are likely to have different neural bases; and (3) there is no unique theory explaining the aetiology of confabulations. An epistemic approach to defining confabulation could solve all of these issues, by focusing on the surface features of the phenomenon. However, existing epistemic accounts are unable to offer sufficient (...)
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  20. Anthropomorphism: a definition and a theory.Stewart E. Guthrie - 1997 - In R. Mitchell, Nicholas S. Thompson & H. L. Miles (eds.), Anthropomorphism, Anecdotes, and Animals. Suny Press. pp. 50--58.
  21.  16
    Moving Forward on Consent Practices in Australia.Rebekah E. McWhirter & Lisa Eckstein - 2018 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 15 (2):243-257.
    Allowing persons to make an informed choice about their participation in research is a pre-eminent ethical and legal requirement. Almost universally, this requirement has been addressed through the provision of written patient information sheets and consent forms. Researchers and others have raised concerns about the extent to which such forms—particularly given their frequent lengthiness and complexity—provide participants with the tools and knowledge necessary for autonomous decision-making. Concerns are especially pronounced for certain participant groups, such as persons with low literacy and (...)
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  22.  41
    Drug Firms, the Codification of Diagnostic Categories, and Bias in Clinical Guidelines.Lisa Cosgrove & Emily E. Wheeler - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (3):644-653.
    The profession of medicine is predicated upon an ethical mandate: first do no harm. However, critics charge that the medical profession’s culture and its public health mission are being undermined by the pharmaceutical industry’s wide-ranging influence. In this article, we analyze how drug firms influence psychiatric taxonomy and treatment guidelines such that these resources may serve commercial rather than public health interests. Moving beyond a conflict-ofinterest model, we use the conceptual and normative framework of institutional corruption to examine how organized (...)
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  23.  16
    The Oxford handbook of feminist theory.Lisa Jane Disch & M. E. Hawkesworth (eds.) - 2016 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    The Oxford Handbook of Feminist Theory provides an overview of the analytical frameworks and theoretical concepts feminist theorists have developed to challenge established knowledge. Leading feminist theorists, from around the globe, provide in-depth explorations of a diverse array of subject areas, capturing a plurality of approaches. The Handbook raises new questions, brings new evidence, and poses significant challenges across the spectrum of academic disciplines, demonstrating the interdisciplinary nature of feminist theory.
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  24.  53
    Drug Firms, the Codification of Diagnostic Categories, and Bias in Clinical Guidelines.Lisa Cosgrove & Emily E. Wheeler - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (3):644-653.
    The possibility that industry is exerting an undue influence on the culture of medicine has profound implications for the profession's public health mission. Policy analysts, investigative journalists, researchers, and clinicians have questioned whether academic-industry relationships have had a corrupting effect on evidence-based medicine. Psychiatry has been at the heart of this epistemic and ethical crisis in medicine. This article examines how commercial entities, such as pharmaceutical companies, influence psychiatric taxonomy and treatment guidelines. Using the conceptual framework of institutional corruption, we (...)
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  25.  8
    Hypocrites! Social Media Reactions and Stakeholder Backlash to Conflicting CSR Information.Lisa D. Lewin & Danielle E. Warren - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-19.
    At a time when firms signal their commitment to CSR through online communication, news sources may convey conflicting information, causing stakeholders to perceive firm hypocrisy. Here, we test the effects of conflicting CSR information that conveys inconsistent outcomes (results-based hypocrisy) and ulterior motives (motive-based hypocrisy) on hypocrisy perceptions expressed in social media posts, which we conceptualize as countersignals that reach a broad audience of stakeholders. Across six studies, we find that (1) conflicting CSR information from internal (firm) and external (news) (...)
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  26.  32
    Leading and Following (Un)ethically in Limen.Miguel Pina E. Cunha, Nuno Guimarães-Costa, Arménio Rego & Stewart R. Clegg - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 97 (2):189-206.
    We propose a liminality-based analysis of the process of ethical leadership/followership in organizations. A liminal view presents ethical leadership as a process taking place in organizational contexts that are often characterized by high levels of ambiguity, which render the usual rules and preferences dubious or inadequate. In these relational spaces, involving leaders, followers, and their context, old frames may be questioned and new ones introduced in an emergent way, through subtle processes whose evolution and implications may not be easy to (...)
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  27.  32
    Research on small genomes: implications for synthetic biology.Lisa Klasson & Siv G. E. Andersson - 2010 - Bioessays 32 (4):288-295.
    Synthetic genomics is a new field of research in which small DNA pieces are assembled in a series of steps into whole genomes. The highly reduced genomes of host‐associated bacteria are now being used as models for de novo synthesis of small genomes in the laboratory. Bacteria with the smallest genomes identified in nature provide nutrients to their hosts, such as amino acids, co‐factors and vitamins. Comparative genomics of these bacteria enables predictions to be made about the gene sets required (...)
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  28.  16
    A Fine Effort to Square a CircleOrganization Ethics in Health Care.Lisa H. Newton, Edward M. Spencer, Ann E. Mills, Mary V. Rorty & Patricia H. Werhane - 2002 - Business Ethics Quarterly 12 (4):539.
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  29.  23
    Obedience and Evil: From Milgram and Kampuchea to Normal Organizations.Miguel Pina E. Cunha, Arménio Rego & Stewart R. Clegg - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 97 (2):291 - 309.
    Obedience: a simple term. Stanley Milgram, the famous experimental social psychologist, shocked the world with theory about it. Another man, Pol Pot, the infamous leader of the Khmer Rouge, showed how far the desire for obedience could go in human societies. Milgram conducted his experiments in the controlled environment of the US psychology laboratory of the 1960s. Pol Pot experimented with Utopia in the totalitarian Kampuchea of the 1970s. In this article, we discuss the process through which the Khmer Rouge (...)
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  30.  14
    Obedience and Evil: From Milgram and Kampuchea to Normal Organizations.Miguel Pina E. Cunha, Arménio Rego & Stewart Clegg - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 97 (2):291-309.
    Obedience: a simple term. Stanley Milgram, the famous experimental social psychologist, shocked the world with theory about it. Another man, Pol Pot, the infamous leader of the Khmer Rouge, showed how far the desire for obedience could go in human societies. Milgram conducted his experiments in the controlled environment of the US psychology laboratory of the 1960s. Pol Pot experimented with Utopia in the totalitarian Kampuchea of the 1970s. In this article, we discuss the process through which the Khmer Rouge (...)
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  31.  63
    The problem of evil and the Satan hypothesis.Stewart E. Kelly - 1997 - Sophia 36 (2):29-42.
  32.  55
    Conflicts of interest and the quality of recommendations in clinical guidelines.Lisa Cosgrove, Harold J. Bursztajn, Deborah R. Erlich, Emily E. Wheeler & Allen F. Shaughnessy - 2013 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (4):674-681.
  33.  46
    Introspection and Free Will.Stewart E. Kelly - 1991 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 39 (1):155-164.
    Introspection is often cited as providing rational warrant for either a libertarian or a compatibilist view of human free will. C. A. Campbell argues for the former position, while Adolf Grünbaum argues for the latter. Others, such as Peter van Inwagen, attempt to show that introspection fails to provide adequate warrent for the belief that humans have free will. The paper seeks to demonstrate how all three views are mistaken, and to show just what introspective evidence rationally justifies. The epistemic (...)
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  34.  22
    Does CSR make better citizens? The influence of employee CSR programs on employee societal citizenship behavior outside of work.Lisa D. Lewin, Danielle E. Warren & Mohammed AlSuwaidi - 2020 - Business and Society Review 125 (3):271-288.
    While corporate social responsibility (CSR) is expected to benefit the firm and attract employees, few have examined the effects of CSR on employees outside of work. Extending the organizational citizenship literature, we conceptualize employee engagement in CSR at work and outside of work as a form of “societal citizenship behavior.” Across two studies of working adults, we examine the relationship between identification with an employer that engages in CSR and different forms of employee societal citizenship behaviors (e.g., donations, volunteering) outside (...)
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  35.  30
    Eyes that bind us: Gaze leading induces an implicit sense of agency.Lisa J. Stephenson, S. Gareth Edwards, Emma E. Howard & Andrew P. Bayliss - 2018 - Cognition 172 (C):124-133.
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  36.  29
    A scoping review of the perceptions of death in the context of organ donation and transplantation.Ian Kerridge, Cameron Stewart, Linda Sheahan, Lisa O’Reilly, Michael J. O’Leary, Cynthia Forlini, Dianne Walton-Sonda, Anil Ramnani & George Skowronski - 2021 - BMC Medical Ethics 22 (1):1-20.
    BackgroundSocio-cultural perceptions surrounding death have profoundly changed since the 1950s with development of modern intensive care and progress in solid organ transplantation. Despite broad support for organ transplantation, many fundamental concepts and practices including brain death, organ donation after circulatory death, and some antemortem interventions to prepare for transplantation continue to be challenged. Attitudes toward the ethical issues surrounding death and organ donation may influence support for and participation in organ donation but differences between and among diverse populations have not (...)
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  37.  37
    A Framework for Analyzing the Ethics of Disclosing Genetic Research Findings.Lisa Eckstein, Jeremy R. Garrett & Benjamin E. Berkman - 2014 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 42 (2):190-207.
    Over the past decade, there has been an extensive debate about whether researchers have an obligation to disclose genetic research findings, including primary and secondary findings. There appears to be an emerging (but disputed) view that researchers have some obligation to disclose some genetic findings to some research participants. The contours of this obligation, however, remain unclear. -/- As this paper will explore, much of this confusion is definitional or conceptual in nature. The extent of a researcher’s obligation to return (...)
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  38.  29
    The Current State of Efforts to Address Disparities, Racism and Cultural Humility in Medical Education.Ross E. McKinney, Norma Poll-Hunter & Lisa D. Howley - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (9):1-3.
    Racism is a complex problem in the US that is institutionalized, personally mediated, and internalized. Within medical education the recognition and response to structural racism is be...
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  39. Living, local, wild waters : into baptismal reality.Lisa E. Dahill - 2018 - In Trevor George Hunsberger Bechtel, Matthew Eaton & Timothy Harvie (eds.), Encountering earth: thinking theologically with a more-than-human world. Eugene, Oregon: Cascade Books.
     
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  40.  16
    The characterization of crystal defects by the fourier transform of long wavelength neutron scattering data.E. W. J. Mitchell & R. J. Stewart - 1967 - Philosophical Magazine 15 (135):617-622.
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  41.  29
    The ion pair distribution functions in molten rubidium chloride.E. W. J. Mitchell, P. F. J. Poncet & R. J. Stewart - 1976 - Philosophical Magazine 34 (5):721-732.
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  42.  26
    Perspective: Evolution of Control Variables and Policies for Closed-Loop Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson’s Disease Using Bidirectional Deep-Brain-Computer Interfaces.Helen M. Bronte-Stewart, Matthew N. Petrucci, Johanna J. O’Day, Muhammad Furqan Afzal, Jordan E. Parker, Yasmine M. Kehnemouyi, Kevin B. Wilkins, Gerrit C. Orthlieb & Shannon L. Hoffman - 2020 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 14.
  43. A General Survey of the Problem of the Absolute and Relative.Stewart E. Dollard - 1947 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 22:29.
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  44.  12
    A Summary of Bergsonism.Stewart E. Dollard - 1942 - Modern Schoolman 20 (1):27-36.
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  45.  3
    A Summary of Bergsonism.Stewart E. Dollard - 1942 - Modern Schoolman 20 (1):27-36.
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  46.  7
    St. Thomas and the Modern Mind.Stewart E. Dollard - 1942 - Modern Schoolman 20 (1):37-47.
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  47.  11
    The Modern Mind.Stewart E. Dollard - 1933 - Modern Schoolman 11 (1):17-19.
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  48.  12
    Two Schools of Becoming (part 2).Stewart E. Dollard - 1930 - Modern Schoolman 6 (3):55-55.
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  49.  11
    Two Schools of Becoming.Stewart E. Dollard - 1930 - Modern Schoolman 6 (3):47-49.
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  50.  35
    The Traffic in Cyberanatomies: Sex/gender/sexualities in Local and Global Formations.Lisa Jean Moore & Adele E. Clarke - 2001 - Body and Society 7 (1):57-96.
    Medical anatomy is one of the key sites of the scientific production, reproduction and maintenance of sex and gender. Our Human Anatomies Project explores the construction, reconstruction and maintenance of difference in genital anatomies, focusing especially on the clitoris. This article focuses on representations of human genitalia in the form of cyberanatomies - video, CD-ROM and internetbased renderings of human bodies. In cyberspace as elsewhere, the biomedical expert remains the proper and dominant mediator between humans and their own bodies, despite (...)
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