9 found
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  1.  32
    Genomic Inheritances: Disclosing Individual Research Results From Whole-Exome Sequencing to Deceased Participants' Relatives.Ben Chan, Flavia M. Facio, Haley Eidem, Sara Chandros Hull, Leslie G. Biesecker & Benjamin E. Berkman - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 12 (10):1-8.
    Whole-genome analysis and whole-exome analysis generate many more clinically actionable findings than traditional targeted genetic analysis. These findings may be relevant to research participants themselves as well as for members of their families. Though researchers performing genomic analyses are likely to find medically significant genetic variations for nearly every research participant, what they will find for any given participant is unpredictable. The ubiquity and diversity of these findings complicate questions about disclosing individual genetic test results. We outline an approach for (...)
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  2.  22
    Scrutinizing the Right Not to Know.Benjamin E. Berkman, Sara Chandros Hull & Leslie G. Biesecker - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (7):17-19.
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  3.  14
    The Nirvana Fallacy and the Return of Results.Leslie G. Biesecker - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (2):43-44.
  4.  34
    Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “Genomic Inheritances: Disclosing Individual Research Results From Whole-Exome Sequencing to Deceased Participants' Relatives”.Sara Chandros Hull, Ben Chan, Leslie G. Biesecker & Benjamin E. Berkman - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 12 (12):W9-W10.
  5.  22
    Orphan Tests.Leslie G. Biesecker - 1996 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 5 (2):300.
    An urgent need for standards and guidelines on genetic testing has arisen because of swift advances in research, facilitated by the Human Genome Project. The goals of the Human Genome Project include the identification of all genes and sequencing of the human genome. The project is currently ahead of schedule and under budget. We can expect an avalanche of genetic information, much of which will be relevant to human disease. In addition to the Human Genome Project, investigator-initiated research projects and (...)
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  6.  16
    The Role of Current Affect, Anticipated Affect and Spontaneous Self-Affirmation in Decisions to Receive Self-Threatening Genetic Risk Information.Rebecca A. Ferrer, Jennifer M. Taber, William M. P. Klein, Peter R. Harris, Katie L. Lewis & Leslie G. Biesecker - 2015 - Cognition and Emotion 29 (8):1456-1465.
  7.  15
    Genethics.Leslie G. Biesecker, Francis S. Collins, Evan G. DeRenzo, Christine Grady & Charles R. MacKay - 1995 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 4 (3):387.
  8.  12
    Clinical Commentary: The Law of Unintended Ethics.Leslie G. Biesecker - 1997 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 25 (1):16-18.
    The law of unintended consequences is generally applied to technological advances that solve one problem but cause another. In this view, the problem created may be worse than that which was solved, hence the law is used as an argument against technological advances. Concern about intent and consequence comes to mind when reading the article by Ronald Green on parental decision making and prenatal genetics. Green's analysis, combined with the realities of genetic practice, raises questions about parental power, eugenics, and (...)
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  9.  4
    Clinical Commentary: The Law of Unintended Ethics.Leslie G. Biesecker - 1997 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 25 (1):16-18.
    The law of unintended consequences is generally applied to technological advances that solve one problem but cause another. In this view, the problem created may be worse than that which was solved, hence the law is used as an argument against technological advances. Concern about intent and consequence comes to mind when reading the article by Ronald Green on parental decision making and prenatal genetics. Green's analysis, combined with the realities of genetic practice, raises questions about parental power, eugenics, and (...)
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