Results for 'Lea-Rachel D. Kosnik'

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  1.  28
    Refusing to Budge: A Confirmatory Bias in Decision Making?Lea-Rachel D. Kosnik - 2007 - Mind and Society 7 (2):193-214.
    Confirmatory bias, defined as the tendency to misinterpret new pieces of evidence as confirming previously held hypotheses, can lead to implacable, even incorrect decision making. It is one of the biases, along with anchoring, framing, and other judgment heuristic errors, that may lead to non-optimal behavior. This paper tests for the existence of confirmatory bias behavior in a uniquely economic setting (tax policy) and in a context relatively lacking in ambiguity. It also tests whether the confirmatory bias phenomenon can be (...)
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  2. ‘I’D Got Self-Destruction Down to a Fine Art’: A Qualitative Exploration of Relative Energy Deficiency in Sport (RED-S) in Endurance Athletes.Rachel Langbein, Daniel Martin, Jacquelyn Allen-Collinson, Lee Crust & Patricia Jackman - 2021 - Journal of Sports Sciences 39 (14):1555-1564.
    Relative Energy Deficiency in Sport (RED-S) is a syndrome of impaired health and performance that occurs as a result of low energy availability (LEA). Whilst many health effects associated with RED-S have been widely studied from a physiological perspective, further research exploring the psychological antecedents and consequences of the syndrome is required. Therefore, the aim of this study was to qualitatively explore athlete experiences of RED-S. Twelve endurance athletes (female n= 10, male n= 2; M age = 28.33 years) reporting (...)
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  3.  22
    Values and Making Decisions About Agricultural Research.Rachelle D. Hollander - 1986 - Agriculture and Human Values 3 (3):33-40.
  4.  8
    I Like Being Who I Am: A Study of Young People's Ideals.Rachel D. Bromnick & Brian L. Swallow - 1999 - Educational Studies 25 (2):117-128.
    The study of young people's heroes and heroines is seen as a powerful way to explore the socio-cultural factors that shape the self. One hundred and eleven girls and 113 boys from an English comprehensive school, aged 11-16 years provided responses to questionnaire items designed to allow them to express freely their ideals and most admired adults. Following content analysis, the results were presented according to dominant responses and underlying values, with separate analyses for age and gender. Most of the (...)
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  5.  43
    Ethics Education at NSF: Commentary on “Standards for Evaluating Proposals to Develop Ethics Curricula”.Rachelle D. Hollander - 2005 - Science and Engineering Ethics 11 (3):509-511.
  6. Journals Have Obligations, Too: Commentary on "Confirmational Response Bias".Rachelle D. Hollander - 1990 - Science, Technology and Human Values 15 (1):46-49.
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  7.  40
    Why Teach Ethics in Science and Engineering?Rachelle D. Hollander, Deborah G. Johnson, Jonathan R. Beckwith & Betsy Fader - 1995 - Science and Engineering Ethics 1 (1):83-87.
    The following views were presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science Seminar “Teaching Ethics in Science and Engineering”, 10–11 February 1993 organized by Stephanie J. Bird , Penny J. Gilmer and Terrell W. Bynum . Opragen Publications thanks the AAAS, seminar organizers and authors for permission to publish extracts from the conference. The opinions expressed are those of the authors and do not reflect the opinions of AAAS or its Board of Directors.
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  8.  39
    Mentoring and Ethical Beliefs in Graduate Education in Science: Commentary on ‘Influences on the Ethical Beliefs of Graduate Students Concerning Research’.Rachelle D. Hollander - 2001 - Science and Engineering Ethics 7 (4):521-524.
  9.  8
    Teaching History and the Changing Nation State: Transnational and Intranational Perspectives. Edited By Robert Guyver. [REVIEW]Rachel D. Hutchins - 2017 - British Journal of Educational Studies 65 (2):270-272.
  10.  6
    Ethics Education at NSF: Commentary on “Standards for Evaluating Proposals to Develop Ethics Curricula”.Rachelle D. Hollander - 2005 - Science and Engineering Ethics 11 (3):509-511.
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  11.  3
    Computability and the game of cops and robbers on graphs.Rachel D. Stahl - 2022 - Archive for Mathematical Logic 61 (3):373-397.
    Several results about the game of cops and robbers on infinite graphs are analyzed from the perspective of computability theory. Computable robber-win graphs are constructed with the property that no computable robber strategy is a winning strategy, and such that for an arbitrary computable ordinal \, any winning strategy has complexity at least \}\). Symmetrically, computable cop-win graphs are constructed with the property that no computable cop strategy is a winning strategy. Locally finite infinite trees and graphs are explored. The (...)
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  12.  13
    Deserts and Gardens: Herodotus and" The English Patient".Rachel D. Friedman - 2008 - Arion 15 (3):47-84.
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  13.  10
    The Social Construction of Safety.Rachelle D. Hollander - 1997 - In Kristin Shrader-Frechette & Laura Westra (eds.), Technology and Values. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 107--114.
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  14.  6
    Parties, Lads, Friends, Love and Newcastle United: A Study of Young People's Values.Rachel D. Bromnick & Brian L. Swallow - 2001 - Educational Studies 27 (2):143-158.
    Traditional research into values has tended to dichotomise young people into categories of self and other orientations. In the present study values were explored within a contemporary context and analysed into more complex value sets. The sample comprised of 111 girls and 133 boys, aged 11-16 , who responded to four open-ended sentences designed to tap philosophies of life, fears and underlying values. The pleasures in life for girls tended to centre on relationships with family, friends and boys, whereas boys (...)
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  15.  25
    Social Genomics: Genomic Inventions in Society: The Nature of What’s to Come.Rachelle D. Hollander - 2002 - Science and Engineering Ethics 8 (4):485-496.
    This paper identifies several kinds of intellectual mistakes that proponents of genetic engineering make, in defending their views and characterizing the views of their opponents. Results from research in the social sciences and humanities illuminate the nature of these mistakes. The mistakes themselves play a role in allowing proponents to gather support from other protagonists in the social controversies involving science and technology. Understanding the controversies requires understanding that innovations are components of complex and ill-structured social problems; the “right answer” (...)
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  16. Promises and Consistency.Rachel Cohon & Jason D'Cruz - 2017 - In Iskra Fileva (ed.), Questions of Character. New York, USA: Oxford University Press. pp. 215-230.
    Situationists in moral philosophy infer from empirical studies in social psychology that human beings lack cross-situational behavioral consistency: that is, for the most part, we human beings are not able to act in the same trait-relevant way across a range of distinct types of situations, because those situational differences trigger differences in behavior. In this paper we defend the following thesis: one who accepts this conclusion (that is, one who judges that human beings in general are not possessed of behavioral (...)
     
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  17.  9
    Remembering Vivian Weil.Rachelle D. Hollander, Michael Davis, Deni Elliott & Michael S. Pritchard - 2017 - Science and Engineering Ethics 23 (3):637-651.
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  18.  13
    Is Engineering Safety Just Business Safety?Rachelle D. Hollander - 1994 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 8 (2):15-18.
  19.  10
    Research on Social Dimensions of Information Technology at Nsf Sbta Brief Update.Rachelle D. Hollander - 1999 - Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 29 (3):32-33.
  20.  10
    Rhetoric and Science.Rachelle D. Hollander - 1994 - Social Epistemology 8 (3):241 – 242.
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  21.  13
    Mindfulness as a Moderator of the Association Between Eating Disorder Cognition and Eating Disorder Behavior Among a Non-Clinical Sample of Female College Students: A Role of Ethnicity.Akihiko Masuda, Rachel D. Marshall & Janet D. Latner - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  22.  1
    Science- and Engineering-Related Ethics and Values Studies: Characteristics of an Emerging Field of Research.Nicholas H. Steneck & Rachelle D. Hollander - 1990 - Science, Technology and Human Values 15 (1):84-104.
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  23.  48
    Engineering Ethics: Looking Back, Looking Forward.Richard A. Burgess, Michael Davis, Marilyn A. Dyrud, Joseph R. Herkert, Rachelle D. Hollander, Lisa Newton, Michael S. Pritchard & P. Aarne Vesilind - 2013 - Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):1395-1404.
    The eight pieces constituting this Meeting Report are summaries of presentations made during a panel session at the 2011 Association for Practical and Professional Ethics (APPE) annual meeting held between March 3rd and 6th in Cincinnati. Lisa Newton organized the session and served as chair. The panel of eight consisted both of pioneers in the field and more recent arrivals. It covered a range of topics from how the field has developed to where it should be going, from identification of (...)
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  24.  54
    Will CRISPR Germline Engineering Close the Door to an Open Future?Rachel L. Mintz, John D. Loike & Ruth L. Fischbach - 2019 - Science and Engineering Ethics 25 (5):1409-1423.
    The bioethical principle of autonomy is problematic regarding the future of the embryo who lacks the ability to self-advocate but will develop this defining human capacity in time. Recent experiments explore the use of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats /Cas9 for germline engineering in the embryo, which alters future generations. The embryo’s inability to express an autonomous decision is an obvious bioethical challenge of germline engineering. The philosopher Joel Feinberg acknowledged that autonomy is developing in children. He advocated that (...)
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  25.  11
    Philosophy of Education in a New Key: Exploring New Ways of Teaching and Doing Ethics in Education in the 21st Century.Rachel Anne Buchanan, Daniella Jasmin Forster, Samuel Douglas, Sonal Nakar, Helen J. Boon, Treesa Heath, Paul Heyward, Laura D’Olimpio, Joanne Ailwood, Scott Eacott, Sharon Smith, Michael Peters & Marek Tesar - 2022 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 54 (8):1178-1197.
    Within the rough ground that is the field of education there is a complex web of ethical obligations: to prepare our students for their future work; to be ethical as educators in our conduct and teaching; to the ethical principles embedded in the contexts in which we work; and given the Southern context of this work, the ethical obligations we have to this land and its First Peoples. We put out a call to colleagues whose work has been concerned with (...)
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  26.  3
    How Readers Understand Causal and Correlational Expressions Used in News Headlines.Rachel C. Adams, Petroc Sumner, Solveiga Vivian-Griffiths, Amy Barrington, Andrew Williams, Jacky Boivin, Christopher D. Chambers & Lewis Bott - 2017 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 23 (1):1-14.
  27.  3
    Acceptable Evidence: Science and Values in Risk Management.Deborah G. Mayo & Rachelle D. Hollander (eds.) - 1994 - Oxford University Press USA.
    Discussions of science and values in risk management have largely focused on how values enter into arguments about risks, that is, issues of acceptable risk. Instead this volume concentrates on how values enter into collecting, interpreting, communicating, and evaluating the evidence of risks, that is, issues of the acceptability of evidence of risk. By focusing on acceptable evidence, this volume avoids two barriers to progress. One barrier assumes that evidence of risk is largely a matter of objective scientific data and (...)
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  28.  18
    Differential Use of Sensory Information in Sexual Behavior as a Function of Gender.Rachel S. Herz & Elizabeth D. Cahill - 1997 - Human Nature 8 (3):275-286.
  29.  33
    Telling the Patient's Story: Using Theatre Training to Improve Case Presentation Skills.Rachel R. Hammer, Johanna D. Rian, Jeremy K. Gregory, J. Michael Bostwick, Candace Barrett Birk, Louise Chalfant, Paul D. Scanlon & Daniel K. Hall-Flavin - 2011 - Medical Humanities 37 (1):18-22.
    A medical student's ability to present a case history is a critical skill that is difficult to teach. Case histories presented without theatrical engagement may fail to catch the attention of their intended recipients. More engaging presentations incorporate ‘stage presence’, eye contact, vocal inflection, interesting detail and succinct, well organised performances. They convey stories effectively without wasting time. To address the didactic challenge for instructing future doctors in how to ‘act’, the Mayo Medical School and The Mayo Clinic Center for (...)
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  30.  15
    Corrigendum: Exposure to Parenting by Lying in Childhood: Associations with Negative Outcomes in Adulthood.Rachel M. Santos, Sarah Zanette, Shiu M. Kwok, Gail D. Heyman & Kang Lee - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  31.  3
    La recherche de nouveaux moyens d’expression philosophiques fut inaugurée Par Nietzsche, et doit être aujourd’hui poursuivie en Rapport avec le renouvellement de certains autres arts, Par exemple, le théâtre ou le cinéma.Léa Baclet - forthcoming - Philosophique.
    Ainsi s’exprime Gilles Deleuze dans les premières pages de Différence et Répétition. Le cinéma est en effet l’un des domaines étudiés par Deleuze, apportant un renouvellement considérable à la philosophie. Il y consacre deux ouvrages : L’image-mouvement et L’image-temps. C’est ce deuxième texte que nous étudierons, et plus précisément le concept même d’image-temps. Car si on peut imaginer sans trop de mal le cinéma comme image-mouvement, image en mouvement, on comprend moins aisément comment...
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  32.  31
    Not an Alternative Model for Intentionality in Vision.R. Brown, D. C. Earle & S. E. G. Lea - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (1):138-139.
  33.  28
    Predicting Intermediate and Multiple Conclusions in Propositional Logic Inference Problems: Further Evidence for a Mental Logic.Martin D. S. Braine, David P. O'Brien, Ira A. Noveck, Mark C. Samuels, R. Brooke Lea, Shalom M. Fisch & Yingrui Yang - 1995 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 124 (3):263.
  34.  4
    Brain Death at Fifty: Exploring Consensus, Controversy, and Contexts.Robert D. Truog, Nancy Berlinger, Rachel L. Zacharias & Mildred Z. Solomon - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (S4):S2-S5.
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  35.  29
    Marvelling at the Marvel: The Supposed Conversion of A. D. Darbishire to Mendelism. [REVIEW]Rachel A. Ankeny - 2000 - Journal of the History of Biology 33 (2):315 - 347.
    The so-called "biometric-Mendelian controversy" has received much attention from science studies scholars. This paper focuses on one scientist involved in this debate, Arthur Dukinfield Darbishire, who performed a series of hybridization experiments with mice beginning in 1901. Previous historical work on Darbishire's experiments and his later attempt to reconcile Mendelian and biometric views describe Darbishire as eventually being "converted" to Mendelism. I provide a new analysis of this episode in the context of Darbishire's experimental results, his underlying epistemology, and his (...)
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  36.  9
    The Effect of the Proportion of Mismatching Trials and Task Orientation on the Confidence–Accuracy Relationship in Unfamiliar Face Matching.Rachel G. Stephens, Carolyn Semmler & James D. Sauer - 2017 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 23 (3):336-353.
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  37.  4
    Rachel Moss, Fatherhood and Its Representations in Middle English Texts. Cambridge, UK, and Rochester, NY: D. S. Brewer, 2013. Pp. X, 224. $99. ISBN: 978-1-84384-358-0. [REVIEW]Noelle Phillips - 2015 - Speculum 90 (2):564-565.
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  38.  43
    R. D. Fulk and Christopher M. Cain, A History of Old English Literature. With a Chapter on Saints' Legends by Rachel S. Anderson. (Blackwell Histories of Literature.) Maiden, Mass.; Oxford; and Carhon, Australia: Blackwell, 2005. Paper. Pp. Ix, 346; 10 Black-and-White Plates and 1 Map. $34.95. First Published in 2003. [REVIEW]Nicholas Howe - 2006 - Speculum 81 (1):191-192.
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  39.  24
    The Cayman Turtle Farm: Why We Can’T Have Our Green Turtle and Eat It Too.Neil D’Cruze, Rachel Alcock & Marydele Donnelly - 2015 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 28 (1):57-66.
    The Cayman Turtle Farm is the only facility in the world that commercially produces green sea turtles for human consumption. The CTF has operated at a significant financial loss for much of its 45 years history and is maintained by substantial Cayman Island Government subsidies. These subsidies run into millions of Caymanian dollars and dwarf the funding allocated to The Caymanian Department of Environment to protect its unique biodiversity each year. We argue that it is time for the CTF to (...)
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  40.  82
    Narratives of 'Terminal Sedation', and the Importance of the Intention-Foresight Distinction in Palliative Care Practice.Charles D. Douglas, Ian H. Kerridge & Rachel A. Ankeny - 2013 - Bioethics 27 (1):1-11.
    The moral importance of the ‘intention–foresight’ distinction has long been a matter of philosophical controversy, particularly in the context of end-of-life care. Previous empirical research in Australia has suggested that general physicians and surgeons may use analgesic or sedative infusions with ambiguous intentions, their actions sometimes approximating ‘slow euthanasia’. In this paper, we report findings from a qualitative study of 18 Australian palliative care medical specialists, using in-depth interviews to address the use of sedation at the end of life. The (...)
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  41.  33
    Akira Akabayashi, MD, Ph. D., is Professor in the Department of Biomedical Ethics at the School of Health Science and Nursing, University of Tokyo Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan, and Professor at the School of Public Health, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan. [REVIEW]Rachel A. Ankeny, M. L. S. Bette Anton, Ana Borovecki, Alister Browne, Debora Diniz, Elisa J. Gordon, Matti Häyry & Steve Heilig - 2004 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 13:215-217.
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  42.  1
    Philosophy of Biology, Psychology, and Neuroscience-The Organism in Philosophical Focus-Fashioning Descriptive Models in Biology: Of Worms and Wiring Diagrams.Manfred D. Laubichier & Rachel A. Ankeny - 2000 - Philosophy of Science 67 (3):S260-S272.
    The biological sciences have become increasingly reliant on so-called ‘model organisms’. I argue that in this domain, the concept of a descriptive model is essential for understanding scientific practice. Using a case study, I show how such a model was formulated in a preexplanatory context for subsequent use as a prototype from which explanations ultimately may be generated both within the immediate domain of the original model and in additional, related domains. To develop this concept of a descriptive model, I (...)
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  43.  34
    Visual Working Memory Resources Are Best Characterized as Dynamic, Quantifiable Mnemonic Traces.Bella Z. Veksler, Rachel Boyd, Christopher W. Myers, Glenn Gunzelmann, Hansjörg Neth & Wayne D. Gray - 2017 - Topics in Cognitive Science 9 (1):83-101.
    Visual working memory is a construct hypothesized to store a small amount of accurate perceptual information that can be brought to bear on a task. Much research concerns the construct's capacity and the precision of the information stored. Two prominent theories of VWM representation have emerged: slot-based and continuous-resource mechanisms. Prior modeling work suggests that a continuous resource that varies over trials with variable capacity and a potential to make localization errors best accounts for the empirical data. Questions remain regarding (...)
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  44.  27
    Akira Akabayashi, MD, Ph. D., is Professor in the Department of Biomedical Ethics at the School of Health Science and Nursing at the University of Tokyo Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan, and Professor at the School of Public Health, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan. [REVIEW]Rachel A. Ankeny, M. L. S. Bette Anton, Alister Browne, Nuket Buken, Murat Civaner, Arthur R. Derse, Brent Dickson, Dan Eastwood, Todd Gilmer & Michael L. Gross - 2003 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 12:229-231.
  45.  25
    Double Meanings Will Not Save the Principle of Double Effect.Charles D. Douglas, Ian H. Kerridge & Rachel A. Ankeny - 2014 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 39 (3):304-316.
    In an article somewhat ironically entitled “Disambiguating Clinical Intentions,” Lynn Jansen promotes an idea that should be bewildering to anyone familiar with the literature on the intention/foresight distinction. According to Jansen, “intention” has two commonsense meanings, one of which is equivalent to “foresight.” Consequently, questions about intention are “infected” with ambiguity—people cannot tell what they mean and do not know how to answer them. This hypothesis is unsupported by evidence, but Jansen states it as if it were accepted fact. In (...)
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  46.  5
    First Do No Harm: Ethical Concerns of Health Researchers That Discourage the Sharing of Results With Research Participants.Rachel S. Purvis, Christopher R. Long, Leah R. Eisenberg, D. Micah Hester, Thomas V. Cunningham, Angel Holland, Harish E. Chatrathi & Pearl A. McElfish - 2020 - Ajob Empirical Bioethics 11 (2):104-113.
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  47.  14
    BERENICE II. D.L. Clayman Berenice II and the Golden Age of Ptolemaic Egypt. Pp. Xii + 270, Ills, Map. New York: Oxford University Press, 2014. Paper, £18.99, US$27.95 . ISBN: 978-0-19-537089-8. [REVIEW]Rachel Mairs - 2015 - The Classical Review 65 (2):517-519.
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  48.  4
    S. MURNAGHAN and D.H. ROBERTS Childhood and the Classics: Britain and America, 1850–1965 . Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018. Pp. Viii + 336. £80. 9780199583478. [REVIEW]Rachel Bryant Davies - forthcoming - Journal of Hellenic Studies:1-2.
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  49.  4
    Historicism and Knowledge. Robert D'Amico.Rachel Laudan - 1990 - Isis 81 (3):613-614.
  50.  25
    What's in a Name? Conceptual Confusion About Death and Consent in Donation After Cardiac Determination of Death.Mark D. Fox, Rachel Budavich, Scott Gelfand, Michael R. Gomez, Ric T. Munoz & Jan Slater - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (8):12-14.
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