Results for 'Lawlor Krista'

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  1.  36
    Assurance: An Austinian View of Knowledge and Knowledge Claims.Krista Lawlor - 2013 - Oxford University Press.
    What is an assurance? What do we do when we claim to know? Krista Lawlor offers an original account based on the work of J. L. Austin. She addresses challenges to contextualist semantic theories; resolves closure-based skeptical paradoxes; and helps us tread the line between acknowledging our fallibility and skepticism.
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  2. Knowing What One Wants.Krista Lawlor - 2009 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 79 (1):47-75.
  3.  65
    New Thoughts About Old Things: Cognitive Policies as the Ground of Singular Concepts.Krista Lawlor - 2001 - Routledge.
    This book defends a novel theory of singular concepts, emphasizing the pragmatic requirements of singular concept possession and arguing that these requirements must be understood to institute traditions and policies of thought.
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  4.  29
    Lawlor, Krista. New Thoughts About Old Things: Cognitive Policies as the Ground of Singular Concepts.Timothy Schroeder - 2003 - Review of Metaphysics 56 (3):661-662.
    Imagine you are looking at a cat and make the following inference: That cat sneezed; That cat is missing an ear; thus There exists a sneezing cat missing an ear. Such an inference is valid only if there is no equivocation on the term “that cat.” If “that cat” in refers to Puss, but in refers to Midnight, then the inference is invalid. This much is elementary. Now imagine that Puss is the cat in front of you when you think, (...)
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  5. Varieties of Coreference.Krista Lawlor - 2010 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 81 (2):485-495.
  6. Exploring the Stability of Belief: Resiliency and Temptation.Krista Lawlor - 2014 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 57 (1):1-27.
    (2014). Exploring the Stability of Belief: Resiliency and Temptation. Inquiry: Vol. 57, The Nature of Belief, pp. 1-27. doi: 10.1080/0020174X.2014.858414.
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  7.  46
    Philosophy of Psychology: A Contemporary Introduction- by José Luis Bermúdez.Krista Lawlor - 2007 - Philosophical Books 48 (2):180-182.
  8.  82
    A Notional Worlds Approach to Confusion.Krista Lawlor - 2007 - Mind and Language 22 (2):150–172.
    People often become confused, mistaking one thing for another, or taking two things to be the same. How should we assign semantic values to confused statements? Recently, philosophers have taken a pessimistic view of confusion, arguing that understanding confused belief demands significant departure from our normal interpretive practice. I argue for optimism. Our semantic treatment of confusion can be a lot like our semantic treatment of empty names. Surprisingly, perhaps, the resulting semantics lets us keep in place more of our (...)
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  9. Elusive Reasons: A Problem for First-Person Authority.Krista Lawlor - 2003 - Philosophical Psychology 16 (4):549-565.
    Recent social psychology is skeptical about self-knowledge. Philosophers, on the other hand, have produced a new account of the source of the authority of self-ascriptions. On this account, it is not descriptive accuracy but authorship which funds the authority of one's self-ascriptions. The resulting view seems to ensure that self-ascriptions are authoritative, despite evidence of one's fallibility. However, a new wave of psychological studies presents a powerful challenge to the authorship account. This research suggests that one can author one's attitudes, (...)
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  10. Austin on Perception, Knowledge and Meaning.Krista Lawlor - 2017 - In Savas L. Tsohatzidis (ed.), Interpreting J. L. Austin: Critical Essays. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
    Austin’s Sense and Sensibilia (1962) generates wildly different reactions among philosophers. Interpreting Austin on perception starts with a reading of this text, and this in turn requires reading into the lectures key ideas from Austin’s work on natural language and the theory of knowledge. The lectures paint a methodological agenda, and a sketch of some first-order philosophy, done the way Austin thinks it should be done. Crucially, Austin calls for philosophers to bring a deeper understanding of natural language meaning to (...)
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  11. Moore's Paradox.Krista Lawlor & John Perry - 2008 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 86 (3):421 – 427.
    G. E. Moore famously noted that saying 'I went to the movies, but I don't believe it' is absurd, while saying 'I went to the movies, but he doesn't believe it' is not in the least absurd. The problem is to explain this fact without supposing that the semantic contribution of 'believes' changes across first-person and third-person uses, and without making the absurdity out to be merely pragmatic. We offer a new solution to the paradox. Our solution is that the (...)
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  12. Living Without Closure.Krista Lawlor - 2005 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 69 (1):25-50.
    Epistemic closure, the idea that knowledge is closed under known implication, plays a central role in current discussions of skepticism and the semantics of knowledge reports. Contextualists in particular rely heavily on the truth of epistemic closure in staking out their distinctive response to the so-called "skeptical paradox." I argue that contextualists should re-think their commitment to closure. Closure principles strong enough to force the skeptical paradox on us are too strong, and closure principles weak enough to express unobjectionable epistemic (...)
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  13. Knowing Beliefs, Seeking Causes.Krista Lawlor - 2008 - American Imago 65 (3):335-356.
    Knowing what one believes sometimes takes effort—it sometimes involves seeking to know one’s beliefs as causes. And when one gains self-knowledge of one’s belief this way—that is, through causal self-interpretation—one engages in a characteristically human kind of psychological liberation. By investigating the nature of causal self-interpretation, I discover some surprising features of this liberty. And in doing so, I counter a trend in recent philosophical theories, of discounting the value of self-knowledge in projects of human liberation.
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  14. Confused Thought and Modes of Presentation.Krista Lawlor - 2005 - Philosophical Quarterly 55 (218):21-36.
    Ruth Millikan has long argued that the phenomenon of confused thought requires us to abandon certain traditional programmes for mental semantics. On the one hand she argues that confused thought involves confused concepts, and on the other that Fregean senses, or modes of presentation, cannot be useful in theorizing about minds capable of confused thinking. I argue that while we might accept that concepts can be confused, we have no reason to abandon modes of presentation. Making sense of confused thought (...)
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  15. Memory, Anaphora, and Content Preservation.Krista Lawlor - 2002 - Philosophical Studies 109 (2):97-119.
    Tyler Burge defends the idea that memory preserves beliefswith their justifications, so that memory's role in inferenceadds no new justificatory demands. Against Burge's view,Christensen and Kornblith argue that memory is reconstructiveand so introduces an element of a posteriori justificationinto every inference. I argue that Burge is right,memory does preserve content, but to defend this viewwe need to specify a preservative mechanism. Toward thatend, I develop the idea that there is something worthcalling anaphoric thinking, which preserves content inBurge's sense of ``content (...)
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  16. Telling as Joint Action: Comments on Richard Moran’s The Exchange of Words. [REVIEW]Krista Lawlor - 2021 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 102 (3):701-707.
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  17. Replies to Leite, Turri, and Gerken.Krista Lawlor - 2015 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 90 (1):235-255.
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  18. Précis of Assurance.Krista Lawlor - 2015 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 90 (1):194-204.
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  19.  30
    Files, Indexicals and Descriptivism.Krista Lawlor - 2013 - Disputatio 5 (36):147-158.
    Lawlor-Krista_Files-indexicals-and-descriptivism.
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  20. Common Sense and Ordinary Language: Wittgenstein and Austin.Krista Lawlor - forthcoming - In Rik Peels & René Van Woudenberg (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Common Sense Philosophy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    What role does ‘ordinary language philosophy’ play in the defense of common sense beliefs? J.L. Austin and Ludwig Wittgenstein each give central place to ordinary language in their responses to skeptical challenges to common sense beliefs. But Austin and Wittgenstein do not always respond to such challenges in the same way, and their working methods are different. In this paper, I compare Austin’s and Wittgenstein’s metaphilosophical positions, and show that they share many metaphilosophical commitments. I then examine Austin and Wittgenstein’s (...)
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  21. Memory.Krista Lawlor - 2009 - In Brian McLaughlin, Ansgar Beckermann & Sven Walter (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Mind. Oxford University Press.
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  22. Knowledge and Reasonableness.Krista Lawlor - 2020 - Synthese 199:1435-1451.
    The notion of relevance plays a role in many accounts of knowledge and knowledge ascription. Although use of the notion is well-motivated, theorists struggle to codify relevance. A reasonable person standard of relevance addresses this codification problem, and provides an objective and flexible standard of relevance; however, treating relevance as reasonableness seems to allow practical factors to determine whether one has knowledge or not—so-called “pragmatic encroachment.” I argue that a fuller understanding of reasonableness and of the role of practical factors (...)
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  23.  19
    Comments on What Is the Point of Knowledge?Krista Lawlor - 2021 - Analysis 81 (1):107-114.
    The point of knowledge is to answer our need for information that will let us successfully navigate our world. So says Edward Craig in Knowledge and the State of Nature. This claim may sound anodyne, but according to Craig, it is crucial we keep this fact uppermost in our minds as we theorize about knowledge. Craig argues that our concept of knowledge begins its life by answering our need to mark out those who have the information we seek. A priori (...)
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  24.  80
    Enough is Enough: Pretense and Invariance in the Semantics of "Knows That".Krista Lawlor - 2005 - Philosophical Perspectives 19 (1):211–236.
  25.  94
    New Essays on Singular Thought, by Robin Jeshion (Ed.).Krista Lawlor - 2013 - Mind 122 (486):fzt017.
  26. Reason and the Past: The Role of Rationality in Diachronic Self-Knowledge.Krista Lawlor - 2005 - Synthese 145 (3):467-495.
    Knowing one’s past thoughts and attitudes is a vital sort of self-knowledge. In the absence of memorial impressions to serve as evidence, we face a pressing question of how such self-knowledge is possible. Recently, philosophers of mind have argued that self-knowledge of past attitudes supervenes on rationality. I examine two kinds of argument for this supervenience claim, one from cognitive dynamics, and one from practical rationality, and reject both. I present an alternative account, on which knowledge of past attitudes is (...)
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  27.  36
    Deliberation and Agential Authority: A Rejoinder to Ferrero.Krista Lawlor - 2003 - Philosophical Psychology 16 (4):579 – 584.
    My reply to Ferrero is divided into three parts: a recap of my argument and claim, a response to Ferrero's central criticism, and, finally, a question about his attempted defense of the authorship account.
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  28.  14
    Review of Simon J. Evnine, Epistemic Dimensions of Personhood[REVIEW]Krista Lawlor - 2009 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (2).
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  29. Austin on Perception, Knowledge and Meaning.Lawlor Krista - forthcoming - In Savas Tsohatzidis (ed.), Interpreting Austin. Cambridge University Press.
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  30.  42
    Krista Lawlor, Assurance: An Austinian View of Knowledge and Knowledge Claims . 231 Pp., £35.00 Hb.Martin Gustafsson - 2014 - Philosophical Investigations 37 (3):272-276.
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  31.  39
    Review of Krista Lawlor, New Thoughts About Old Things: Cognitive Policies As the Ground of Singular Concepts[REVIEW]Kent Bach - 2002 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2002 (2).
  32.  56
    Assurance: An Austinian View of Knowledge and Knowledge Claims, by Krista Lawlor. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013, 231 Pp. ISBN 10/13: 978–0199657896 Hb £36.00. [REVIEW]Nat Hansen - 2016 - European Journal of Philosophy 24 (1):298-302.
  33.  47
    Assurance: An Austinian View of Knowledge and Knowledge Claims, Written by Krista Lawlor[REVIEW]Patrick Rysiew - 2016 - International Journal for the Study of Skepticism 6 (1):65-72.
  34.  31
    Book Review: Assurance: An Austinian View of Knowledge and Knowledge Claims, Written by Krista Lawlor[REVIEW]Patrick Rysiew - 2016 - International Journal for the Study of Skepticism 6 (1).
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  35.  29
    Book Review: Assurance: An Austinian View of Knowledge and Knowledge Claims, Written by Krista Lawlor[REVIEW]Patrick Rysiew - forthcoming - International Journal for the Study of Skepticism.
  36. Moore’s Paradox, Truth and Accuracy: A Reply to Lawlor and Perry.John N. Williams & Mitchell S. Green - 2011 - Acta Analytica 26 (3):243-255.
    G. E. Moore famously observed that to assert ‘I went to the pictures last Tuesday but I do not believe that I did’ would be ‘absurd’. Moore calls it a ‘paradox’ that this absurdity persists despite the fact that what I say about myself might be true. Krista Lawlor and John Perry have proposed an explanation of the absurdity that confines itself to semantic notions while eschewing pragmatic ones. We argue that this explanation faces four objections. We give (...)
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  37.  16
    Replies to Henderson, Elgin and Lawlor.Michael Hannon - 2021 - Analysis 81 (1):114-129.
    I acquired many intellectual debts while writing What’s the Point of Knowledge?, but I am especially indebted to my three symposiasts. David Henderson’s work helped me to appreciate the value of thinking about the point of epistemic evaluation; Catherine Elgin’s writings prompted me to investigate the purpose of the concept of understanding; and Krista Lawlor’s 2013 book revealed important connections between three of my primary epistemological interests: the role of epistemic evaluation, the semantics of knowledge claims and the (...)
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  38. Mental Files: Replies to My Critics.François Recanati - 2013 - Disputatio 5 (36):207-242.
    My responses to seven critical reviews of my book *Mental Files* published in a special issue of the journal Disputatio, edited by F. Salis. The reviewers are: Keith Hall, David Papineau, Annalisa Coliva and Delia Belleri, Peter Pagin, Thea Goodsell, Krista Lawlor and Manuel Garcia-Carpintero.
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  39.  68
    Assertion and Assurance: Some Empirical Evidence.John Turri - 2015 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 90 (1):214-222.
    I report three experiments relevant to evaluating Krista Lawlor's theory of assurance, respond to her criticism of the knowledge account of assertion, and propose an alternative theory of assurance.
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  40.  25
    Précis of "What’s the Point of Knowledge?".Michael Hannon - 2021 - Analysis 81 (1):85-87.
    I acquired many intellectual debts while writing What’s the Point of Knowledge?, but I am especially indebted to my three symposiasts. David Henderson’s work helped me to appreciate the value of thinking about the point of epistemic evaluation; Catherine Elgin’s writings prompted me to investigate the purpose of the concept of understanding; and Krista Lawlor’s 2013 book revealed important connections between three of my primary epistemological interests: the role of epistemic evaluation, the semantics of knowledge claims and the (...)
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  41. An Institution of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in Multi-National Corporations (MNCs): Form and Implications. [REVIEW]Krista Bondy, Jeremy Moon & Dirk Matten - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 111 (2):281-299.
    This article investigates corporate social responsibility (CSR) as an institution within UK multi-national corporations (MNCs). In the context of the literature on the institutionalization of CSR and on critical CSR, it presents two main findings. First, it contributes to the CSR mainstream literature by confirming that CSR has not only become institutionalized in society but that a form of this institution is also present within MNCs. Secondly, it contributes to the critical CSR literature by suggesting that unlike broader notions of (...)
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  42.  27
    Reasoning About Artifacts at 24 Months: The Developing Teleo-Functional Stance.Krista Casler & Deborah Kelemen - 2007 - Cognition 103 (1):120-130.
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  43.  18
    The Adoption of Voluntary Codes of Conduct in MNCs: A Three‐Country Comparative Study.Krista Bondy, Dirk Matten & Jeremy Moon - 2004 - Business and Society Review 109 (4):449-477.
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  44.  17
    Mitigating Stakeholder Marginalisation with the Relational Self.Krista Bondy & Aurelie Charles - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 165 (1):67-82.
    Stakeholder theory has been an incredibly powerful tool for understanding and improving organisations, and their relationship with other actors in society. That these critical ideas are now accepted within mainstream business is due in no small part to the influence of stakeholder theory. However, improvements to stakeholder engagement through stakeholder theory have tended to help stakeholders who are already somewhat powerful within organisational settings, while those who are less powerful continue to be marginalised and routinely ignored. In this paper, we (...)
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  45.  4
    Naked: The Dark Side of Shame and Moral Life.Krista K. Thomason - 2018 - Oup Usa.
    Shame is a Jekyll-and-Hyde emotion--it can be morally valuable, but it also has a dark side. Thomason presents a philosophically rigorous and nuanced account of shame that accommodates its harmful and helpful aspects. Thomason argues that despite its obvious drawbacks and moral ambiguity, shame's place in our lives is essential.
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  46. Krista K. Thomason, Naked: The Dark Side of Shame and Moral Life, Oxford University Press, 2018.Mark Alfano - forthcoming - Criminal Justice Ethics.
    In Naked, Krista K. Thomason offers a multi-faceted account of shame, covering its nature as an emotion, its positive and negative roles in moral life, its association with violence, and its provocation through invitations to shame, public shaming, and stigmatization. Along the way, she reflects on a range of examples drawn from literature, memoirs, journalism, and her own imagination. She also considers alternative views at length, draws a wealth of important distinctions, and articulates many of the most intuitive objections (...)
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  47.  14
    The Epoche as the Derridean Absolute: Final Comments on the Evans-Kates-Lawlor Debate.Leonard Lawlor - 1998 - Philosophy Today 42 (2):207-210.
  48.  22
    Moral Theories in Teaching Applied Ethics.R. Lawlor - 2007 - Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (6):370-372.
    It is argued, in this paper, that moral theories should not be discussed extensively when teaching applied ethics. First, it is argued that, students are either presented with a large amount of information regarding the various subtle distinctions and the nuances of the theory and, as a result, the students simply fail to take it in or, alternatively, the students are presented with a simplified caricature of the theory, in which case the students may understand the information they are given, (...)
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  49.  29
    Responding to Ethical Loneliness.Krista K. Thomason - 2018 - Philosophy Today 62 (2):707-715.
  50. Shame, Violence, and Morality.Krista K. Thomason - 2015 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 91 (1):1-24.
    Shame is most frequently defined as the emotion we feel when we fail to live up to standards, norms, or ideals. I argue that this definition is flawed because it cannot explain some of the most paradigmatic features of shame. Agents often respond to shame with violence, but if shame is the painful feeling of failing to live up to an ideal, this response is unintelligible. I offer a new account of shame that can explain the link between shame and (...)
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