Results for 'Laura Rascaroli'

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  1.  2
    Lost and Beautiful or the (Environmental) Ethics of the Lyric Essay Film.Laura Rascaroli & Paolo Saporito - 2023 - Film-Philosophy 27 (3):464-487.
    This article contributes to a theory of the lyric essay film by bringing studies of the essay film and lyricism to bear on Pietro Marcello’s Lost and Beautiful (2015). We argue that the lyric essay film delivers its argument by leveraging the tension between words and images, narrative and counter-narrative components, and the (non)human subjectivities (i.e. the director’s, characters’ and camera’s) its text embodies and enacts. These tensions generate interstitial sites from which the ethics and politics of the lyric essay (...)
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  2.  28
    The cause of cosmopolitanism: dispositions, models, transformations.Patrick O'Donovan & Laura Rascaroli (eds.) - 2010 - New York: Peter Lang.
    PATRICK O'DONOVAN AND LAURA RASCAROLI Introduction: Cosmopolitanism between Spaces and Practices Cosmopolitan Spaces You are standing in the Pantheon in ...
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  3.  56
    Laura Rascaroli (2009) The Personal Camera: Subjective Cinema and the Essay Film.Matilde Nardelli - 2010 - Film-Philosophy 14 (2):191-195.
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  4.  99
    Does size matter? The state of the art in small business ethics.Laura J. Spence - 1999 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 8 (3):163–174.
    In this paper the exclusive focus on large firms in the field of business ethics is challenged. Some of the idiosyncrasies of small firms are explained, and links are made between these and potential ethical issues. A review of the existing literature on ethics in small firms demonstrates the lack of appropriate research, so that to date we can draw no firm conclusions in relation to ethics in the small firm. Recommendations are made as to the way forward for small (...)
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  5. Acceptance and the ethics of belief.Laura K. Soter - 2023 - Philosophical Studies 180 (8):2213-2243.
    Various philosophers authors have argued—on the basis of powerful examples—that we can have compelling moral or practical reasons to believe, even when the evidence suggests otherwise. This paper explores an alternative story, which still aims to respect widely shared intuitions about the motivating examples. Specifically, the paper proposes that what is at stake in these cases is not belief, but rather acceptance—an attitude classically characterized as taking a proposition as a premise in practical deliberation and action. I suggest that acceptance’s (...)
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  6.  27
    Behind Closed Doors: Irbs and the Making of Ethical Research.Laura Stark - 2011 - University of Chicago Press.
    IRBs in action -- Everyone's an expert? Warrants for expertise -- Local precedents -- Documents and deliberations: an anticipatory perspective -- Setting IRBs in motion in Cold War America -- An ethics of place -- The many forms of consent -- Deflecting responsibility -- Conclusion: the making of ethical research.
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  7.  71
    CSR and Small Business in a European Policy Context: The Five “C”s of CSR and Small Business Research Agenda 2007.Laura J. Spence - 2007 - Business and Society Review 112 (4):533-552.
  8.  70
    Small Business Social Responsibility: Expanding Core CSR Theory.Laura J. Spence - 2016 - Business and Society 55 (1):23-55.
    This article seeks to expand business and society research in a number of ways. Its primary purpose is to redraw two core corporate social responsibility theories, enhancing their relevance for small business. This redrawing is done by the application of the ethic of care, informed by the value of feminist perspectives and the extant empirical research on small business social responsibility. It is proposed that the expanded versions of core theory have wider relevance, value, and implications beyond the small firm (...)
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  9.  59
    SMEs, Social Capital and the Common Good.Laura J. Spence & René Schmidpeter - 2003 - Journal of Business Ethics 45 (1/2):93 - 108.
    In this paper we report on empirical research which investigates social capital of Small and Medium Sized Enterprises (SMEs). Bringing an international perspective to the work, we make a comparison between 30 firms located in West London and Munich in the sectors of food manufacturing/production, marketing services and garages. Here we present 6 case studies, which we use to illustrate the early findings from this pilot project. We identify differences in approach to associational membership in Germany and the U.K., with (...)
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  10.  10
    Corporate Social Responsibility and Small Business in a European Policy Context.Laura J. Spence - 2007 - Business and Society Review 112 (4):533-552.
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  11. Normative Concepts: A Connectedness Model.Laura Schroeter - 2014 - Philosophers' Imprint 14.
    This paper proposes a new relational account of concepts and shows how it is particularly well suited to characterizing normative concepts. The key advantage of our ‘connectedness’ model is that it explains how subjects can share the same normative concepts despite radical divergences in the descriptive or motivational commitments they associate with them. The connectedness model builds social and historical facts into the foundations of concept identity. This aspect of the model, we suggest, reshapes normative epistemology and provides new resources (...)
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  12. Coercion and Justice.Laura Valentini - 2011 - American Political Science Review 105 (1):205-220.
    In this article, I develop a new account of the liberal view that principles of justice are meant to justify state coercion, and consider its implications for the question of global socioeconomic justice. Although contemporary proponents of this view deny that principles of socioeconomic justice apply globally, on my newly developed account this conclusion is mistaken. I distinguish between two types of coercion, systemic and interactional, and argue that a plausible theory of global justice should contain principles justifying both. The (...)
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  13.  39
    The Global Governance of Neurotechnology: The Need for an Ecosystem Approach.David Winickoff, Laura Kreiling & Lou Lennad - 2024 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 15 (2):116-118.
    As neurotechnologies continue to develop and diffuse, this fast-paced field must be guided by robust governance frameworks in order to promote responsible innovation. The article by Bublitz (2024)...
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  14.  83
    A defense of back-end doxastic voluntarism.Laura Soter - forthcoming - Noûs.
    Doxastic involuntarism—the thesis that we lack direct voluntary control (in response to non-evidential reasons) over our belief states—is often touted as philosophical orthodoxy. I here offer a novel defense of doxastic voluntarism, centered around three key moves. First, I point out that belief has two central functional roles, but that discussions of voluntarism have largely ignored questions of control over belief's guidance function. Second, I propose that we can learn much about doxastic control by looking to cognitive scientific research on (...)
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  15.  38
    The Forgotten Stakeholder? Ethics and Social Responsibility in Relation to Competitors.Laura J. Spence, Anne-Marie Coles & Lisa Harris - 2001 - Business and Society Review 106 (4):331-352.
  16.  31
    The Mill-Whewell Debate: Much Ado about Induction.Laura J. Snyder - 1997 - Perspectives on Science 5 (2):159-198.
    This article examines the nineteenth-century debate about scientific method between John Stuart Mill and William Whewell. Contrary to standard interpretations (given, for example, by Achinstein, Buchdahl, Butts, and Laudan), I argue that their debate was not over whether to endorse an inductive methodology but rather over the nature of inductive reasoning in science and the types of conclusions yielded by it. Whewell endorses, while Mill rejects, a type of inductive reasoning in which inference is employed to find a property or (...)
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  17.  37
    The Value of Emotions for Knowledge.Laura Candiotto (ed.) - 2019 - Springer Verlag.
    This innovative new volume analyses the role of emotions in knowledge acquisition. It focuses on the field of philosophy of emotions at the exciting intersection between epistemology and philosophy of mind and cognitive science to bring us an in-depth analysis of the epistemological value of emotions in reasoning. With twelve chapters by leading and up-and-coming academics, this edited collection shows that emotions do count for our epistemic enterprise. Against scepticism about the possible positive role emotions play in knowledge, the authors (...)
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  18. Towards a computational theory of mood.Laura Sizer - 2000 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 51 (4):743-770.
    Moods have global and profound effects on our thoughts, motivations and behavior. To understand human behavior and cognition fully, we must understand moods. In this paper I critically examine and reject the methodology of conventional ?cognitive theories? of affect. I lay the foundations of a new theory of moods that identifies them with processes of our cognitive functional architecture. Moods differ fundamentally from some of our other affective states and hence require distinct explanatory tools. The computational theory of mood I (...)
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  19. Discoverers' induction.Laura J. Snyder - 1997 - Philosophy of Science 64 (4):580-604.
    In this paper I demonstrate that, contrary to the standard interpretations, William Whewell's view of scientific method is neither that of the hypothetico-deductivist nor that of the retroductivist. Rather, he offers a unique inductive methodology, which he calls "discoverers' induction." After explicating this methodology, I show that Kepler's discovery of his first law of planetary motion conforms to it, as Whewell claims it does. In explaining Whewell's famous phrase about "happy guesses" in science, I suggest that Whewell intended a distinction (...)
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  20.  21
    Vulnerability identified in clinical practice: a qualitative analysis.Laura Sossauer, Mélinée Schindler & Samia Hurst - 2019 - BMC Medical Ethics 20 (1):1-10.
    Background Although it is the moral duty of physicians to protect vulnerable patients, there are no data on how vulnerability is perceived in clinical practice. This study explores how physicians classify someone as “vulnerable”. Method Thirty-three physicians were initially questioned about resource allocation problems in their work. The results of these interviews were examined with qualitative study software to identify characteristics associated with vulnerability in patients. Data were conceptualized, classified and cross-linked to highlight the major determinants of vulnerability. The findings (...)
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  21. Illusion of transparency.Laura Schroeter - 2007 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 85 (4):597 – 618.
    It's generally agreed that, for a certain a class of cases, a rational subject cannot be wrong in treating two elements of thought as co-referential. Even anti-individualists like Tyler Burge agree that empirical error is impossible in such cases. I argue that this immunity to empirical error is illusory and sketch a new anti-individualist approach to concepts that doesn't require such immunity.
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  22.  45
    Eye Movements Reveal the Dynamic Simulation of Speed in Language.Laura J. Speed & Gabriella Vigliocco - 2014 - Cognitive Science 38 (2):367-382.
    This study investigates how speed of motion is processed in language. In three eye-tracking experiments, participants were presented with visual scenes and spoken sentences describing fast or slow events (e.g., The lion ambled/dashed to the balloon). Results showed that looking time to relevant objects in the visual scene was affected by the speed of verb of the sentence, speaking rate, and configuration of a supporting visual scene. The results provide novel evidence for the mental simulation of speed in language and (...)
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  23.  13
    The Sound of Smell: Associating Odor Valence With Disgust Sounds.Laura J. Speed, Hannah Atkinson, Ewelina Wnuk & Asifa Majid - 2021 - Cognitive Science 45 (5):e12980.
    Olfaction has recently been highlighted as a sense poorly connected with language. Odor is difficult to verbalize, and it has few qualities that afford mimicry by vision or sound. At the same time, emotion is thought to be the most salient dimension of an odor, and it could therefore be an olfactory dimension more easily communicated. We investigated whether sounds imitative of an innate disgust response can be associated with unpleasant odors. In two experiments, participants were asked to make a (...)
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  24.  47
    Meta-Analysis of Menstrual Cycle Effects on Women’s Mate Preferences.Wendy Wood, Laura Kressel, Priyanka D. Joshi & Brian Louie - 2014 - Emotion Review 6 (3):229-249.
    In evolutionary psychology predictions, women’s mate preferences shift between fertile and nonfertile times of the month to reflect ancestral fitness benefits. Our meta-analytic test involving 58 independent reports (13 unpublished, 45 published) was largely nonsupportive. Specifically, fertile women did not especially desire sex in short-term relationships with men purported to be of high genetic quality (i.e., high testosterone, masculinity, dominance, symmetry). The few significant preference shifts appeared to be research artifacts. The effects declined over time in published work, were limited (...)
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  25.  52
    It's all necessarily so: William Whewell on scientific truth.Laura J. Snyder - 1994 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 25 (5):785-807.
  26.  32
    William Whewell.Laura J. Snyder - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  27. Metasemantics and Metaethics.Laura Schroeter & Francois Schroeter - 2016 - In Tristram Colin McPherson & David Plunkett (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Metaethics. New York: Routledge. pp. 519-535.
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  28.  43
    An Exception to Mental Simulation: No Evidence for Embodied Odor Language.Laura J. Speed & Asifa Majid - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (4):1146-1178.
    Do we mentally simulate olfactory information? We investigated mental simulation of odors and sounds in two experiments. Participants retained a word while they smelled an odor or heard a sound, then rated odor/sound intensity and recalled the word. Later odor/sound recognition was also tested, and pleasantness and familiarity judgments were collected. Word recall was slower when the sound and sound-word mismatched. Sound recognition was higher when sounds were paired with a match or near-match word. This indicates sound-words are mentally simulated. (...)
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  29. Learning from doing: Intervention and causal inference.Laura Schulz, Tamar Kushnir & Alison Gopnik - 2007 - In Alison Gopnik & Laura Schulz (eds.), Causal learning: psychology, philosophy, and computation. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 67--85.
  30.  80
    Native-language recognition abilities in 4-month-old infants from monolingual and bilingual environments.Laura Bosch & Núria Sebastián-Gallés - 1997 - Cognition 65 (1):33-69.
  31. Normative realism: co-reference without convergence?Laura Schroeter - 2013 - Philosophers' Imprint 13.
    This paper examines whether realists can explain co-reference without appealing to subjects’ ideal convergence in judgment. This question is particularly pressing in the normative domain, since deep disagreement about the applicability of normative predicates suggests that different speakers may not pick out the same property when they use normative terms. Normative realists, we believe, have not been sufficiently aware of the difficulties involved in providing a theory of reference-determination. Our aim in this paper is to clarify the nature of this (...)
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  32.  44
    Consilience, confirmation, and realism.Laura J. Snyder - 2005 - In Peter Achinstein (ed.), Scientific Evidence: Philosophical Theories & Applications. The Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 129--149.
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  33.  13
    Emergence.Laura Stark - 2019 - Isis 110 (2):332-336.
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  34.  39
    Neurophysiological and neurocognitive mechanisms underlying the effects of yoga-based practices: towards a comprehensive theoretical framework.Laura Schmalzl, Chivon Powers & Eva Henje Blom - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  35.  34
    What we would (but shouldn't) do for those we love: Universalism versus partiality in responding to others' moral transgressions.Laura K. Soter, Martha K. Berg, Susan A. Gelman & Ethan Kross - 2021 - Cognition 217 (C):104886.
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  36. Jackson’s classical model of meaning.Laura Schroeter & John Bigelow - 2009 - In Ian Ravenscroft (ed.), Minds, Ethics, and Conditionals: Themes from the Philosophy of Frank Jackson. Oxford, GB: Oxford University Press.
    Frank Jackson often writes as if his descriptivist account of public language meanings were just plain common sense. How else are we to explain how different speakers manage to communicate using a public language? And how else can we explain how individuals arrive at confident judgments about the reference of their words in hypothetical scenarios? Our aim in this paper is to show just how controversial the psychological assumptions behind in Jackson’s semantic theory really are. First, we explain how Jackson’s (...)
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  37. Is Evidence Historical?Laura J. Snyder - 1994 - In Peter Achinstein & Laura J. Snyder (eds.), Scientific methods: conceptual and historical problems. Malabar, Fla.: Krieger Pub. Co.. pp. 95--117.
     
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  38.  23
    Movement-based embodied contemplative practices: definitions and paradigms.Laura Schmalzl, Mardi A. Crane-Godreau & Peter Payne - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  39.  98
    Sad Songs Say So Much: The Paradoxical Pleasures of Sad Music.Laura Sizer - 2019 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 77 (3):255-266.
    Listening to music can be an intensely moving experience. Many people love music in part because of its power to alter or amplify their moods, and turn to music for inspiration, comfort, or therapy. It is a puzzle, then, why many of us spend so much time listening to sad music. If music can influence our moods, and assuming that most people would prefer to be happy not sad, why would we choose to listen to sad music? I revisit the (...)
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  40. Confirmation for a modest realism.Laura J. Snyder - 2005 - Philosophy of Science 72 (5):839-849.
    In the nineteenth century, William Whewell claimed that his confirmation criterion of consilience was a truth-guarantor: we could, he believed, be certain that a consilient theory was true. Since that time Whewell has been much ridiculed for this claim by critics such as J. S. Mill and Bas van Fraassen. I have argued elsewhere that, while Whewell's claim that consilience can guarantee the truth of a theory is clearly wrong, consilience is indeed quite useful as a confirmation criterion (Snyder 2005). (...)
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  41.  22
    Using an electronic bulletin board in teaching business ethics: En route to a virtual agora.Laura J. Spence & David Wadsworth - 2002 - Teaching Business Ethics 6 (3):335-354.
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  42. Good and Good For You: An Affect Theory of Happiness.Laura Sizer - 2010 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 80 (1):133-163.
    Philosophers tended to identify happiness with either subjective psychological states or conditions (feelings, emotions or a set of judgments), or with the objective conditions of a life—how well the life is going for the person living it. Each approach captures different but important features of our intuitions, making it difficult to accept either a purely subjective or objective view. This has led some philosophers to suggest that these are not competing accounts of one thing, ‘happiness,’ but accounts of several different (...)
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  43.  23
    Do intuitive and deliberate judgments rely on two distinct neural systems? A case study in face processing.Laura F. Mega, Gerd Gigerenzer & Kirsten G. Volz - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9:148721.
    Arguably the most influential models of human decision-making today are based on the assumption that two separable systems – intuition and deliberation – underlie the judgments that people make. Our recent work is among the first to present neural evidence contrary to the predictions of these dual-systems accounts. We measured brain activations using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while participants were specifically instructed to either intuitively or deliberately judge the authenticity of emotional facial expressions. Results from three different analyses revealed (...)
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  44.  16
    Applying a Women’s Health Lens to the Study of the Aging Brain.Caitlin M. Taylor, Laura Pritschet, Shuying Yu & Emily G. Jacobs - 2019 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 13:468826.
    A major challenge in neuroscience is to understand what happens to a brain as it ages. Such insights could make it possible to distinguish between individuals who will undergo typical aging and those at risk for neurodegenerative disease. Over the last quarter century, thousands of human brain imaging studies have probed the neural basis of age-related cognitive decline. “Aging” studies generally enroll adults over the age of 65, a historical precedent rooted in the average retirement age of U.S. wage-earners. A (...)
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  45.  52
    Intuitive and analytical processes in insight problem solving: a psycho-rhetorical approach to the study of reasoning.Laura Macchi & Maria Bagassi - 2012 - Mind and Society 11 (1):53-67.
    Language and thought share a unitary cognitive activity, addressed by an interpretative function. This interpretative effort reveals the assonance between the attribution of meaning to an utterance and the discovery of a solution via restructuring in insight problem solving. We suggest a view of complex integrated analytical thinking, which assumes that thinking processes information in different ways, depending on the characteristics of the tasks the subject has to solve, so that reasoning results in a stepwise, rule-based process or in a (...)
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  46.  37
    Whewell and the Scientists: Science and Philosophy of Science in 19th Century Britain.Laura Snyder - 2002 - Vienna Circle Institute Yearbook 9:81-94.
    What is the relation between science and philosophy of science? Specifically, does it matter whether a philosopher of science knows much about science or is actually engaged in scientific research? William Whewell is an obvious person to consider in relation to this question. Whewell was actively engaged in science in several important ways, some of which have not been previously noted. He conducted research in a number of scientific fields, he devised new terminology for the new discoveries made by other (...)
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  47.  25
    The Fallacy of the “Gift of Life”.Laura A. Siminoff & Kata Chillag - 1999 - Hastings Center Report 29 (6):34-41.
    In the dominant metaphor for organ transplantation, the organ is the ultimate gift, the dying donor's life‐giving bequest, conveyed and made possible by a heroic transplant team. The metaphor encourages donation and enforces recipients’ compliance with post‐transplant treatment. It is also inaccurate and sometimes deeply damaging for the recipient.
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  48.  95
    The Art of Tattoos.Laura Sizer - 2020 - British Journal of Aesthetics 60 (4):419-433.
    In this paper I make the case that at least some tattoos are artworks. I go on to propose a definition of tattoo art that distinguishes it from other uses of tattooing, and from other forms of visual art. I argue that tattoo art is an art form that creates artworks in living skin, and that the living body is an essential component of and contributor to the artwork. This gives rise to several other distinctive features of tattoo art, in (...)
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  49.  24
    Implementing the TARGET Model in Physical Education: Effects on Perceived Psychobiosocial and Motivational States in Girls.Laura Bortoli, Maurizio Bertollo, Edson Filho, Selenia di Fronso & Claudio Robazza - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  50.  37
    Learning to live with Parkinson’s disease in the family unit: an interpretative phenomenological analysis of well-being.Laura J. Smith & Rachel L. Shaw - 2017 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 20 (1):13-21.
    We investigated family members’ lived experience of Parkinson’s disease aiming to investigate opportunities for well-being. A lifeworld-led approach to healthcare was adopted. Interpretative phenomenological analysis was used to explore in-depth interviews with people living with PD and their partners. The analysis generated four themes: It’s more than just an illness revealed the existential challenge of diagnosis; Like a bird with a broken wing emphasizing the need to adapt to increasing immobility through embodied agency; Being together with PD exploring the kinship (...)
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