4 found
Order:
  1.  18
    The Unwitting Accomplice: How Organizations Enable Motivated Reasoning and Self-Serving Behavior.Laura J. Noval & Morela Hernandez - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 157 (3):699-713.
    In this article, we demonstrate that individuals use motivated reasoning to convince themselves that their self-serving behavior is justified, which in turn affects the distribution of resources in business situations. Specifically, we explore how ambiguous contextual cues and individual beliefs can jointly form motivated reasoning. Across two experimental studies, we find that whereas individual ideologies that endorse status hierarchies can strengthen the relationship between contextual ambiguity and motivated reasoning, individual beliefs rooted in fairness and equality can weaken it. Our findings (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  2.  32
    Accounting for Proscriptive and Prescriptive Morality in the Workplace: The Double-Edged Sword Effect of Mood on Managerial Ethical Decision Making.Laura J. Noval & Günter K. Stahl - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 142 (3):589-602.
    This article provides a conceptual framework for studying the influence of mood on managerial ethical decision making. We draw on mood-congruency theory and the affect infusion model to propose that mood influences managerial ethical decision making through deliberate and conscious assessments of the moral intensity of an ethical issue. By accounting for proscriptive and prescriptive morality—i.e., harmful and prosocial behavior, respectively—we demonstrate that positive and negative mood may have asymmetrical and paradoxical effects on ethical decision making. Specifically, our analysis suggests (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  3.  14
    The Sadder but Nicer Effect: How Incidental Sadness Reduces Morally Questionable Behavior.Laura J. Noval, Günter K. Stahl & Chen-Bo Zhong - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-18.
    This article explores the influence of sadness in ethical decision-making and behavior. In three laboratory studies, we found that an incidental state of sadness reduced individuals’ propensity to engage in morally questionable behavior, including both unethical and selfish acts (Studies 1 to 3). We found this effect to be mediated by the role of sadness in prompting people to pay more attention to the negative consequences of morally questionable acts and perceive those consequences as more problematic (Studies 2 and 3). (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  6
    Publisher Correction to: The Sadder but Nicer Effect: How Incidental Sadness Reduces Morally Questionable Behavior.Laura J. Noval, Günter K. Stahl & Chen-Bo Zhong - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-1.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark