Results for 'Kyle T. Kassman'

986 found
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  1.  58
    Stepping out of history: Mindfulness improves insight problem solving.Brian D. Ostafin & Kyle T. Kassman - 2012 - Consciousness and Cognition 21 (2):1031-1036.
    Insight problem solving is hindered by automated verbal–conceptual processes. Because mindfulness meditation training aims at “nonconceptual awareness” which involves a reduced influence of habitual verbal–conceptual processes on the interpretation of ongoing experience, mindfulness may facilitate insight problem solving. This hypothesis was examined across two studies . Participants in both studies completed a measure of trait mindfulness and a series of insight and noninsight problems. Further, participants in Study 2 completed measures of positive affect and a mindfulness or control training. The (...)
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  2.  25
    Conflict of interest in online point-of-care clinical support websites: Table 1.Kyle T. Amber, Gaurav Dhiman & Kenneth W. Goodman - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (8):578-580.
    Point-of-care evidence-based medicine websites allow physicians to answer clinical queries using recent evidence at the bedside. Despite significant research into the function, usability and effectiveness of these programmes, little attention has been paid to their ethical issues. As many of these sites summarise the literature and provide recommendations, we sought to assess the role of conflicts of interest in two widely used websites: UpToDate and Dynamed. We recorded all conflicts of interest for six articles detailing treatment for the following conditions: (...)
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  3.  18
    Sex Differences in Exploration Behavior and the Relationship to Harm Avoidance.Kyle T. Gagnon, Elizabeth A. Cashdan, Jeanine K. Stefanucci & Sarah H. Creem-Regehr - 2016 - Human Nature 27 (1):82-97.
    Venturing into novel terrain poses physical risks to a female and her offspring. Females have a greater tendency to avoid physical harm, while males tend to have larger range sizes and often outperform females in navigation-related tasks. Given this backdrop, we expected that females would explore a novel environment with more caution than males, and that more-cautious exploration would negatively affect navigation performance. Participants explored a novel, large-scale, virtual environment in search of five objects, pointed in the direction of each (...)
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  4.  18
    Not all those who wander are lost: Spatial exploration patterns and their relationship to gender and spatial memory.Kyle T. Gagnon, Brandon J. Thomas, Ascher Munion, Sarah H. Creem-Regehr, Elizabeth A. Cashdan & Jeanine K. Stefanucci - 2018 - Cognition 180:108-117.
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  5. God Loves Flags, But I Don't: Why the Pledge of Allegiance is an American Travesty.Kyle T. Morrison - 2013 - In Christian Hubert-Rodier (ed.), None. Hôtel des Bains Éditions.
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  6.  17
    Bridging the Consumer‐Medical Divide: How to Regulate Direct‐to‐Consumer Genetic Testing.Kyle T. Edwards & Caroline J. Huang - 2014 - Hastings Center Report 44 (3):17-19.
    While 23andMe aspires to be “the world's trusted source of personal genetic information,” the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) believes that the company's advertising practices have been anything but trustworthy. Last November, a harshly worded FDA “warning letter” demanded that the direct‐to‐consumer genetic testing company immediately discontinue marketing its unapproved “medical device.” The tussle between 23andMe and the FDA has attracted more attention than a typical disagreement between a company and a government agency. Larry Downes and Paul Nunes identify (...)
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  7.  19
    Pharmaceutical Ethics and Physician Liability in Side Effects.Gaurav J. Dhiman & Kyle T. Amber - 2013 - Journal of Medical Humanities 34 (4):497-503.
    We review Side Effects, a 2013 film involving bioethics, pharmaceuticals, and financial conspiracies. After the main character Emily unsuccessfully attempts suicide, she begins receiving care from a psychiatrist, Dr. Banks. Following numerous events, she is placed on a fictional antidepressant, Ablixa, which leads her to suffer from sleepwalking. During an episode of sleepwalking she commits a serious crime. The film poses an interesting dilemma: How responsible would the physician be in this instance? We analyze this question by applying numerous ethical (...)
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  8.  44
    Physiological Noise in Brainstem fMRI.Jonathan C. W. Brooks, Olivia K. Faull, Kyle T. S. Pattinson & Mark Jenkinson - 2013 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
  9.  13
    Relating spatial perspective taking to the perception of other's affordances: providing a foundation for predicting the future behavior of others.Sarah H. Creem-Regehr, Kyle T. Gagnon, Michael N. Geuss & Jeanine K. Stefanucci - 2013 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
  10.  28
    The Self-Pleasantness Judgment Modulates the Encoding Performance and the Default Mode Network Activity.Marcela Perrone-Bertolotti, Melanie Cerles, Kylee T. Ramdeen, Naila Boudiaf, Cedric Pichat, Pascal Hot & Monica Baciu - 2016 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 10.
  11.  65
    Info/information theory: Speakers choose shorter words in predictive contexts.Kyle Mahowald, Evelina Fedorenko, Steven T. Piantadosi & Edward Gibson - 2013 - Cognition 126 (2):313-318.
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  12.  39
    Word Forms Are Structured for Efficient Use.Kyle Mahowald, Isabelle Dautriche, Edward Gibson & Steven T. Piantadosi - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (8):3116-3134.
    Zipf famously stated that, if natural language lexicons are structured for efficient communication, the words that are used the most frequently should require the least effort. This observation explains the famous finding that the most frequent words in a language tend to be short. A related prediction is that, even within words of the same length, the most frequent word forms should be the ones that are easiest to produce and understand. Using orthographics as a proxy for phonetics, we test (...)
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  13.  32
    Effects of language experience on domain-general perceptual strategies.Kyle Jasmin, Hui Sun & Adam T. Tierney - 2021 - Cognition 206 (C):104481.
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  14.  37
    Wordform Similarity Increases With Semantic Similarity: An Analysis of 100 Languages.Isabelle Dautriche, Kyle Mahowald, Edward Gibson & Steven T. Piantadosi - 2017 - Cognitive Science:2149-2169.
    Although the mapping between form and meaning is often regarded as arbitrary, there are in fact well-known constraints on words which are the result of functional pressures associated with language use and its acquisition. In particular, languages have been shown to encode meaning distinctions in their sound properties, which may be important for language learning. Here, we investigate the relationship between semantic distance and phonological distance in the large-scale structure of the lexicon. We show evidence in 100 languages from a (...)
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  15.  16
    Genetic Contributions to Intergroup Responses: A Cautionary Perspective.Kyle G. Ratner & Jennifer T. Kubota - 2012 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.
  16.  3
    ¡Presente!: Nonviolent Politics and the Resurrection of the Dead.Kyle B. T. Lambelet - 2020 - Georgetown University Press.
    ¡Presente! develops a lived theology of nonviolence through an extended case study of the movement to close the School of the Americas (also known as the SOA or WHINSEC). Specifically,it analyzes how the presence of the dead—a presence proclaimed at the annual vigil of the School of the Americas Watch—shapes a distinctive, transnational, nonviolent movement. Kyle B.T. Lambelet argues that such a messianic affirmation need not devolve into violence or sectarianism and, in fact, generates practical reasoning. By developing a (...)
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  17.  10
    Mourning the Dead, Following the Living.Kyle B. T. Lambelet - 2019 - Journal of Religious Ethics 47 (3):583-600.
    In this paper I take up the ambivalence we rightly feel toward leaders by examining the relationship between charismatic authority and moral exemplarity. Drawing on the social theory of Max Weber, and in dialogue with a case study of an anti-militarism movement called the SOA (School of Americas) Watch, I demonstrate that through a “politics of sacrifice” leaders synchronize their own stories with those of communally recognized exemplars and act in ways that evidence a solidarity in the suffering of those (...)
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  18.  23
    Words cluster phonetically beyond phonotactic regularities.Isabelle Dautriche, Kyle Mahowald, Edward Gibson, Anne Christophe & Steven T. Piantadosi - 2017 - Cognition 163 (C):128-145.
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  19.  6
    The Lure of the Apocalypse: Ecology, Ethics, and the End of the World.Kyle B. T. Lambelet - 2021 - Studies in Christian Ethics 34 (4):482-497.
    What should we make of the apocalyptic tone taken up by politicians, journalists, scientists, and activists? Some environmental thinkers such as Michael Shellenberger contend that alarming rhetoric distracts us from the technological and governance challenges presented by climate change. In the article, it is argued that retrieving a practical apocalyptic political theology from the Christian tradition can both clarify conceptual contradictions within this discourse as well as offer a practical orientation toward living within ecological endings. Amid the cascade of environmental (...)
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  20.  23
    Dead Enough? NRP-cDCD and Remaining Questions for the Ethics of DCD Protocols.Patrick McCruden, Jason T. Eberl, Erica K. Salter & Kyle Karches - 2023 - American Journal of Bioethics 23 (2):41-43.
    In their article, Nielsen Busch and Mjaaland defend the moral permissibility of cDCD, suggesting that much of the controversy around this donation practice has been the result of a misinterpretatio...
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  21.  28
    The Pediatrician's Dilemma: Respecting Parental Autonomy Versus Protecting Vulnerable Children.Michael R. Gomez, Kyle J. Bielefeld, Michelle K. Escala, Ric T. Munoz & Mark D. Fox - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (1):22-23.
  22.  9
    Individuals, traditions, and the righteous.Craig T. Palmer & Kyle J. Clark - 2018 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 41.
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  23.  16
    Influence of Combined Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation and Motor Training on Corticospinal Excitability in Children With Unilateral Cerebral Palsy.Samuel T. Nemanich, Tonya L. Rich, Chao-Ying Chen, Jeremiah Menk, Kyle Rudser, Mo Chen, Gregg Meekins & Bernadette T. Gillick - 2019 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 13.
  24.  32
    Unregulated Health Research Using Mobile Devices: Ethical Considerations and Policy Recommendations.Mark A. Rothstein, John T. Wilbanks, Laura M. Beskow, Kathleen M. Brelsford, Kyle B. Brothers, Megan Doerr, Barbara J. Evans, Catherine M. Hammack-Aviran, Michelle L. McGowan & Stacey A. Tovino - 2020 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 48 (S1):196-226.
    Mobile devices with health apps, direct-to-consumer genetic testing, crowd-sourced information, and other data sources have enabled research by new classes of researchers. Independent researchers, citizen scientists, patient-directed researchers, self-experimenters, and others are not covered by federal research regulations because they are not recipients of federal financial assistance or conducting research in anticipation of a submission to the FDA for approval of a new drug or medical device. This article addresses the difficult policy challenge of promoting the welfare and interests of (...)
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  25. Attitudes, Presuppositions, and the Binding Theory.Kyle Blumberg - forthcoming - Journal of Semantics.
    In order to handle presuppositions in the scope of attitude verbs, the binding theory allows presuppositions triggered in a subject's beliefs to be bound at the matrix level; and it allows presuppositions triggered in non-doxastic attitudes to be bound in the subject's beliefs (Geurts, 1999; Maier, 2015). However, we argue that this leads to serious overgeneration, for example it predicts that the unacceptable `Sue will come to the party, but Bill is sure that she won't and that only Sue will (...)
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  26. Why Monogamy is Morally Permissible: A Defense of Some Common Justifications for Monogamy.Kyle York - 2020 - Journal of Value Inquiry 54 (4):539-552.
    Harry Chalmers argues that monogamy involves restricting one’s partner’s access to goods in a morally troubling way that is analogous to an agreement between partners to have no additional friends. Chalmers finds the traditional defenses of monogamy wanting, since they would also justify a friendship-restricting agreement. I show why three traditional defenses of monogamy hold up quite well and why they don’t, for the most part, also justify friendship-restricting agreements. In many cases, monogamy can be justified on grounds of practicality, (...)
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  27.  23
    Citizen Science on Your Smartphone: An ELSI Research Agenda: Currents in Contemporary Bioethics.Mark A. Rothstein, John T. Wilbanks & Kyle B. Brothers - 2015 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 43 (4):897-903.
    Beginning in the 20th century, scientific research came to be dominated by a growing class of credentialed, professional scientists who overwhelmingly displaced the learned amateurs of an earlier time. By the end of the century, however, the exclusive realm of professional scientists conducting research was joined, to a degree, by “citizen scientists.” The term originally encompassed non-professionals assisting professional scientists by contributing observations and measurements to ongoing research enterprises. These collaborations were especially common in the environmental sciences, where citizen scientists (...)
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  28. Wanting what’s not best.Kyle Blumberg & John Hawthorne - 2021 - Philosophical Studies 179 (4):1275-1296.
    In this paper, we propose a novel account of desire reports, i.e. sentences of the form 'S wants p'. Our theory is partly motivated by Phillips-Brown's (2021) observation that subjects can desire things even if those things aren't best by the subject's lights. That is, being best isn't necessary for being desired. We compare our proposal to existing theories, and show that it provides a neat account of the central phenomenon.
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  29. P, but you don’t know that P.Christopher Willard-Kyle - 2021 - Synthese 199 (5-6):14667-14690.
    Unlike first-person Moorean sentences, it’s not always awkward to assert, “p, but you don’t know that p.” This can seem puzzling: after all, one can never get one’s audience to know the asserted content by speaking thus. Nevertheless, such assertions can be conversationally useful, for instance, by helping speaker and addressee agree on where to disagree. I will argue that such assertions also make trouble for the growing family of views about the norm of assertion that what licenses proper assertion (...)
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  30.  8
    Q: A Rude, Interfering, Inconsiderate, Sadistic Pest—on a Quest for Justice?Kyle Alkema & Adam Barkman - 2016-03-14 - In Kevin S. Decker & Jason T. Eberl (eds.), The Ultimate Star Trek and Philosophy. Wiley. pp. 105–114.
    The nearly omnipotent character known only as “Q” dramatically enters the Star Trek universe when he puts all humanity in the person of Captain Jean‐Luc Picard, on trial in the first episode of TNG. Acting as self‐professed prosecutor, judge, and jury, Q promises Picard an “absolutely equitable” trial, only to coerce Picard into pleading “guilty” by threatening to kill his crew. Q could be like the “Leviathan” of Thomas Hobbes (1588‐1679), an absolute sovereign who has the power to keep people (...)
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  31. Against the Doctrine of Infallibility.Christopher Willard-Kyle - 2021 - Philosophical Quarterly 71 (4):pqaa082.
    According to the doctrine of infallibility, one is permitted to believe p if one knows that necessarily, one would be right if one believed that p. This plausible principle—made famous in Descartes’ cogito—is false. There are some self-fulfilling, higher-order propositions one can’t be wrong about but shouldn’t believe anyway: believing them would immediately make one's overall doxastic state worse.
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  32.  5
    The limits of politics: making the case for literature in political analysis.Kyle Scott - 2016 - Lanham, Maryland: Lexington Books.
    Don't pray for war -- Is democracy worth it? -- Taking speech seriously -- In recognition of limits -- The limits of politics.
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  33. Association of prenatal modifiable risk factors with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder outcomes at age 10 and 15 in an extremely low gestational age cohort. [REVIEW]David M. Cochran, Elizabeth T. Jensen, Jean A. Frazier, Isha Jalnapurkar, Sohye Kim, Kyle R. Roell, Robert M. Joseph, Stephen R. Hooper, Hudson P. Santos, Karl C. K. Kuban, Rebecca C. Fry & T. Michael O’Shea - 2022 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 16:911098.
    BackgroundThe increased risk of developing attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in extremely preterm infants is well-documented. Better understanding of perinatal risk factors, particularly those that are modifiable, can inform prevention efforts.MethodsWe examined data from the Extremely Low Gestational Age Newborns (ELGAN) Study. Participants were screened for ADHD at age 10 with the Child Symptom Inventory-4 (N = 734) and assessed at age 15 with a structured diagnostic interview (MINI-KID) to evaluate for the diagnosis of ADHD (N = 575). We studied associations (...)
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  34.  36
    Generative Assembly after Katrina.Kyle Parry - 2018 - Critical Inquiry 44 (3):554-581.
    Although Hurricane Katrina precipitated considerable reflection across various media, a practice crucial to our capacities to apprehend and interpret the disaster has not yet been analyzed as such. I call this practice generative assembly. I don’t mean the events of emergency and political gathering that took place in response to the massive storm and fatal, preventable levee failures—although I will propose connections between different forms of assembly. Instead I mean a kind of documentary practice. That practice, which can be undertaken (...)
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  35.  99
    Responsibility for Wrongdoing Without Blameworthiness: How it Makes Sense and How it Doesn't.Kyle G. Fritz - 2014 - Philosophical Quarterly 64 (257):569-589.
    Some writers, such as John Fischer and Michael McKenna, have recently claimed that an agent can be morally responsible for a wrong action and yet not be blameworthy for that action. A careful examination of the claim, however, suggests two readings. On one reading, there are further conditions on blameworthiness beyond freely and wittingly doing wrong. On another innocuous reading, there are no such further conditions. Despite Fischer and McKenna’s attempts to offer further conditions on blameworthiness in addition to responsibility (...)
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  36. Proof That Knowledge Entails Truth.Brent G. Kyle - forthcoming - Journal of Philosophy.
    Despite recent controversies surrounding the principle that knowledge entails truth (KT), this paper aims to prove that the principle is true. It offers a proof of (KT) in the following sense. It advances a deductively valid argument for (KT), whose premises are, by most lights, obviously true. Moreover, each premise is buttressed by at least two supporting arguments. And finally, all premises and supporting arguments can be rationally accepted by people who don’t already accept (KT).
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  37. Trust, trustworthiness, and obligation.Mona Simion & Christopher Willard-Kyle - 2024 - Philosophical Psychology 37 (1):87-101.
    Where does entitlement to trust come from? When we trust someone to φ, do we need to have reason to trust them to φ or do we start out entitled to trust them to φ by default? Reductivists think that entitlement to trust always “reduces to” or is explained by the reasons that agents have to trust others. In contrast, anti-reductivists think that, in a broad range of circumstances, we just have entitlement to trust. even if we don’t have positive (...)
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  38. What VP ellipsis can do, and what it can't, but not why.Kyle Johnson - 2001 - In Mark Baltin & Chris Collins (eds.), The Handbook of Contemporary Syntactic Theory. Blackwell. pp. 439--479.
  39.  1
    Don’t Look Up as Philosophy: Comets, Climate Change, and Why the Snacks Are Not Free.Chris Lay & David Kyle Johnson - 2022 - In David Kyle Johnson (ed.), The Palgrave Handbook of Popular Culture as Philosophy. Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 1373-1409.
    Don’t Look Up is a 2021 Netflix original film about two astronomers who discover a 9-kilometer “planet killer” comet on a collision course with Earth. The way humanity responds to this threat – which is less than ideal, given that the movie ends with humanity’s destruction – is supposed to be an allegory for how humanity is dealing with the real-world threat of climate change. Consequently, we argue, the movie is an argument that presents the viewer with a moral imperative: (...)
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  40.  21
    Non-augmented reality: why we shouldn’t look through technology.Kyle van Oosterum - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-2.
  41.  30
    Ethics, X-Phi, and the Expanded Methodological Toolbox: How the Think Aloud Method and Interview Reveal People’s Judgments on Issues in Ethics and Beyond.Kyle Thompson - 2019 - Dissertation, Claremont Graduate University
    Ethics isn’t a conversation exclusive to philosophers. There is value, then, in not only understanding how laypeople think about issues in ethics, but also bringing their judgments into dialogue with those of philosophers in order to make sense of agreement, disagreement, and the consequences of each. Experimental philosophers facilitate this dialogue uniquely by capturing laypeople’s judgments and analyzing them in light of philosophical theory. They have done so almost exclusively by using face valid quantitative surveys about philosophically interesting thought experiments. (...)
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  42. Gapping isn't (VP) ellipsis.Kyle Johnson - manuscript
    Pseudogapping is no misnomer. Despite the many tempting similarities, Gapping and Pseudogapping are distinct constructions. Pseudogapping is a special instance of VP Ellipsis, while Gapping, I will argue, is a special instance of across-the-board movement. Squeezing Gapping into across-the-board movement has its own discomforts, however, which I will suggest can be remedied by re-tailoring our syntax to include string-based output constraints. I give a sketch of one such alteration that involves apparent Left Branch Condition violations.
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  43. Explanation and Justification: Understanding the Functions of Fact-Insensitive Principles.Kyle Johannsen - 2016 - Socialist Studies 11 (1):174-86.
    In recent work, Andrew T. Forcehimes and Robert B. Talisse correctly note that G.A. Cohen’s fact-insensitivity thesis, properly understood, is explanatory. This observation raises an important concern. If fact-insensitive principles are explanatory, then what role can they play in normative deliberations? The purpose of my paper is, in part, to address this question. Following David Miller, I indicate that on a charitable understanding of Cohen’s thesis, an explanatory principle explains a justificatory fact by completing an otherwise logically incomplete inference. As (...)
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  44.  40
    The Palgrave Handbook of Popular Culture as Philosophy.David Kyle Johnson (ed.) - 2022 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Much philosophical work on pop culture apologises for its use; using popular culture is a necessary evil, something merely useful for reaching the masses with important philosophical arguments. But works of pop culture are important in their own right--they shape worldviews, inspire ideas, change minds. We wouldn't baulk at a book dedicated to examining the philosophy of The Great Gatsby or 1984--why aren't Star Trek and Superman fair game as well? After all, when produced, the former were considered pop culture (...)
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  45.  11
    Jon Stewart and the Fictional War on Christmas.Jason Holt & David Kyle Johnson - 2013 - In The Ultimate Daily Show and Philosophy. Oxford: Wiley. pp. 231–246.
    Every December we are told there is a war on Christmas. Jon Stewart, however, claims that this war is a farce. In 2005, Fox News correspondent John Gibson published The War on Christmas, and Bill O'Reilly complained about businesses such as Walmart saying “Happy Holidays” to their customers instead of “Merry Christmas.” Christmas celebrations were largely illegal in both England and the Americas during the 1600 s and 1700 s. Christmas made a cultural comeback in the early 1800 s, but (...)
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  46. The Eyes Don’t Have It: Fracturing the Scientific and Manifest Images.P. Kyle Stanford - 2012 - Humana Mente 5 (21):19-44.
    Wilfrid Sellars famously argued that we find ourselves simultaneously presented with the scientific and manifest images and that the primary aim of philosophy is to reconcile the competing conceptions of ourselves and our place in the world they offer. I first argue that Sellars’ own attempts at such a reconciliation must be judged a failure. I then go on to point out that Sellars has invited us to join him in idealizing and constructing the manifest and scientific images by conflating (...)
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  47.  20
    Introducing philosophy through pop culture: from Socrates to Star Wars and beyond.William Irwin & David Kyle Johnson (eds.) - 2022 - Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell.
    Though Trey Parker and Matt Stone haven't been killed for it (they did receive death threats after their 200th episode) the creators of South Park have faced accusations much like those that led to Socrates' execution: the corruption of youth and the teaching of vulgar, irreligious behavior. A closer examination, however, reveals that South Park is very much within the Platonic tradition, as Kyle and Stan engage in questioning and dialogue in order to "learn something today." Moreover, the mob (...)
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  48.  8
    Peer Review and Scholarly Originality: Let 1,000 Flowers Bloom, but Don’t Step on Any.David Strang & Kyle Siler - 2017 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 42 (1):29-61.
    We examine the criticisms and subsequent changes that arise in the course of peer review. Fifty-two scholars who had recently published in Administrative Science Quarterly were surveyed regarding their peer review experience and how their article changed from initial journal submission to eventual publication. Papers that challenged theoretical perspectives faced distinctively high levels of criticism and change, particularly with attention to methodology, while those that offered a new perspective or that extended or combined established perspectives were less criticized and changed. (...)
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  49.  5
    Following Jesus in a warming world: a Christian call to climate action.Kyle Meyaard-Schaap - 2023 - Downers Grove, Illinois: IVP, an imprint of InterVarsity Press.
    Many young Christians are waking up to the realities of climate change but just don't know how to help. Through stories from the field, theological and scriptural exploration, and practical advice, this field guide from Christian climate activist Kyle Meyaard-Schaap helps us take meaningful action grounded in the joy of caring for creation.
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  50. Inference to the Best Explanation and Rejecting the Resurrection.David Kyle Johnson - 2021 - Socio-Historical Examination of Religion and Ministry 3 (1):26-51.
    Christian apologists, like Willian Lane Craig and Stephen T. Davis, argue that belief in Jesus’ resurrection is reasonable because it provides the best explanation of the available evidence. In this article, I refute that thesis. To do so, I lay out how the logic of inference to the best explanation (IBE) operates, including what good explanations must be and do by definition, and then apply IBE to the issue at hand. Multiple explanations—including (what I will call) The Resurrection Hypothesis, The (...)
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