Results for 'Kristen Hewett'

522 found
Order:
  1.  34
    Do proposed facial expressions of contempt, shame, embarrassment, and compassion communicate the predicted emotion?Sherri C. Widen, Anita M. Christy, Kristen Hewett & James A. Russell - 2011 - Cognition and Emotion 25 (5):898-906.
  2. Are there limits to scientists' obligations to seek and engage dissenters?Kristen Intemann & Inmaculada de Melo-Martín - 2014 - Synthese 191 (12):2751-2765.
    Dissent is thought to play a valuable role in science, so that scientific communities ought to create opportunities for receiving critical feedback and take dissenting views seriously. There is concern, however, that some dissent does more harm than good. Dissent on climate change and evolutionary theory, for example, has confused the public, created doubt about existing consensus, derailed public policy, and forced scientists to devote resources to respond. Are there limits to the extent to which scientific communities have obligations to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  3. The brain basis of emotion: A meta-analytic review.Kristen A. Lindquist, Tor D. Wager, Hedy Kober, Eliza Bliss-Moreau & Lisa Feldman Barrett - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (3):121-143.
    Researchers have wondered how the brain creates emotions since the early days of psychological science. With a surge of studies in affective neuroscience in recent decades, scientists are poised to answer this question. In this target article, we present a meta-analytic summary of the neuroimaging literature on human emotion. We compare the locationist approach (i.e., the hypothesis that discrete emotion categories consistently and specifically correspond to distinct brain regions) with the psychological constructionist approach (i.e., the hypothesis that discrete emotion categories (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   176 citations  
  4. Distinguishing between legitimate and illegitimate values in climate modeling.Kristen Intemann - 2015 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 5 (2):217-232.
    While it is widely acknowledged that science is not “free” of non-epistemic values, there is disagreement about the roles that values can appropriately play. Several have argued that non-epistemic values can play important roles in modeling decisions, particularly in addressing uncertainties ; Risbey 2007; Biddle and Winsberg 2010; Winsberg : 111-137, 2012); van der Sluijs 359-389, 2012). On the other hand, such values can lead to bias ; Bray ; Oreskes and Conway 2010). Thus, it is important to identify when (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   75 citations  
  5.  16
    Feminist Human Rights: A Political Approach.Kristen Hessler - 2023 - Lanham: Lexington Books.
    Kristen Hessler argues that philosophy can best contribute to understanding human rights by exploring the full range of their use in practice. Her approach emphasizes how human rights activism and adjudication can both reveal and dismantle unjust social hierarchies. The result is an innovative vision of interdisciplinary human rights scholarship.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  6. Generating new theory for online writing instruction.Beth L. Hewett - 2001 - Kairos: A Journal of Rhetoric, Technology, and Pedagogy 6 (2).
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Live-tweeting: the rise of real-time reporting.Jonathan Hewett - 2015 - In Lawrie Zion & David Craig (eds.), Ethics for digital journalists: emerging best practices. London: Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Years of Feminist Empiricism and Standpoint Theory: Where Are We Now?Kristen Intemann - 2010 - Hypatia 25 (4):778-796.
    Over the past twenty-five years, numerous articles in Hypatia have clarified, revised, and defended increasingly more nuanced views of both feminist empiricism and standpoint feminism. Feminist empiricists have argued that scientific knowledge is contextual and socially situated (Longino 1990; Nelson 1990; Anderson 1995), and standpoint feminists have begun to endorse virtues of theory choice that have been traditionally empiricist (Wylie 2003). In fact, it is unclear whether substantive differences remain. I demonstrate that current versions of feminist empiricism and standpoint feminism (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   82 citations  
  9.  45
    A construct divided: prosocial behavior as helping, sharing, and comforting subtypes.Kristen A. Dunfield - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  10.  84
    What’s in a Word? Language Constructs Emotion Perception.Kristen A. Lindquist & Maria Gendron - 2013 - Emotion Review 5 (1):66-71.
    In this review, we highlight evidence suggesting that concepts represented in language are used to create a perception of emotion from the constant ebb and flow of other people’s facial muscle movements. In this “construction hypothesis,” (cf. Gendron, Lindquist, Barsalou, & Barrett, 2012) (see also Barrett, 2006b; Barrett, Lindquist, & Gendron, 2007; Barrett, Mesquita, & Gendron, 2011), language plays a constitutive role in emotion perception because words ground the otherwise highly variable instances of an emotion category. We demonstrate that language (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   31 citations  
  11.  36
    “They Hate on Me!” Black Teachers Interrupting Their White Colleagues’ Racism.Kristen E. Duncan - 2019 - Educational Studies 55 (2):197-213.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  12.  36
    Primate Sociality to Human Cooperation.Kristen Hawkes - 2014 - Human Nature 25 (1):28-48.
    Developmental psychologists identify propensities for social engagement in human infants that are less evident in other apes; Sarah Hrdy links these social propensities to novel features of human childrearing. Unlike other ape mothers, humans can bear a new baby before the previous child is independent because they have help. This help alters maternal trade-offs and so imposes new selection pressures on infants and young children to actively engage their caretakers’ attention and commitment. Such distinctive childrearing is part of our grandmothering (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  13.  32
    Moral Development in Business Ethics: An Examination and Critique.Kristen Bell DeTienne, Carol Frogley Ellertson, Marc-Charles Ingerson & William R. Dudley - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (3):429-448.
    The field of behavioral ethics has seen considerable growth over the last few decades. One of the most significant concerns facing this interdisciplinary field of research is the moral judgment-action gap. The moral judgment-action gap is the inconsistency people display when they know what is right but do what they know is wrong. Much of the research in the field of behavioral ethics is based on early work in moral psychology and American psychologist Lawrence Kohlberg’s foundational cognitive model of moral (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  14. A functional architecture of the human brain: emerging insights from the science of emotion.Kristen A. Lindquist & Lisa Feldman Barrett - 2012 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 16 (11):533-540.
  15.  15
    Borrowing Privilege: Status Maneuvering among Marginalized Men.Kristen Barber & Sharon S. Oselin - 2019 - Gender and Society 33 (2):201-223.
    Research shows people confront social marginalization through work, yet this scholarship largely ignores people working in illicit markets. We address this gap by investigating how and to what end men in street prostitution “borrow” privilege from their more structurally advantaged clients. Drawing from interviews with men of color in street sex work, we show how they “status maneuver” to offset stigmatized identities tied to prostitution and to construct a masculinity that offers a greater sense of social worth within constrained circumstances. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. How do you ground your training? Sharing the principles and processes of preparing educators for online writing instruction.Beth L. Hewett & Christa Ehmann Powers - 2005 - Kairos: A Journal of Rhetoric, Technology, and Pedagogy 10.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  9
    Books in Review.Kristen Renwick Monroe - 1997 - Political Theory 25 (2):289-295.
  18.  28
    QR Out of a Tensed Clause: Evidence from Antecedent‐Contained Deletion.Kristen Syrett - 2015 - Ratio 28 (4):395-421.
    This paper presents an argument based on evidence from experiments featuring Antecedent-Contained Deletion sentences situated in carefully-manipulated discourse contexts, that covert movement is not grammatically constrained by tense. ACD is a form of Verb Phrase Ellipsis in which ellipsis is embedded in its antecedent. Under an account appealing to Quantifier Raising, the quantificational phrase containing the ellipsis site raises to a VP-external position, allowing the VP to become the antecedent. When ACD is embedded in a non-finite clause, such sentences are (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19.  14
    Forms of Artistry.Kristen S. Yee - 1999 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 42 (4):581-589.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20.  83
    Emotions Emerge from More Basic Psychological Ingredients: A Modern Psychological Constructionist Model.Kristen A. Lindquist - 2013 - Emotion Review 5 (4):356-368.
    Over a century ago, William James outlined the first psychological constructionist model of emotion, arguing that emotions are phenomena constructed of more basic psychological parts. In this article, I outline a modern psychological constructionist model of emotion. I first explore the history of psychological construction to demonstrate that psychological constructionist models have historically emerged in an attempt to explain variability in emotion that cannot be accounted for by other approaches. I next discuss the modern psychological constructionist model of emotion that (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   28 citations  
  21.  6
    Theology, Political Theory, and Pluralism: Beyond Tolerance and Difference.Kristen Deede Johnson - 2007 - Cambridge University Press.
    How can we live together in the midst of our differences? This is one of the most pressing questions of our time. Tolerance has been the bedrock of political liberalism, while proponents of agonistic political thought and radical democracy have sought an answer that allows a deeper celebration of difference. Kristen Deede Johnson describes the move from tolerance to difference, and the accompanying move from epistemology to ontology, within political theory. Building on this 'ontological turn', in search of a (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  22. Feminism, Underdetermination, and Values in Science.Kristen Intemann - 2005 - Philosophy of Science 72 (5):1001-1012.
    Several feminist philosophers of science have tried to open up the possibility that feminist ethical or political commitments could play a positive role in good science by appealing to the Duhem-Quine thesis and underdetermination of theories by observation. I examine several different interpretations of the claim that feminist values could play a legitimate role in theory justification and show that none of them follow from a logical gap between theory and observation. Finally, I sketch an alternative approach for defending the (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   44 citations  
  23.  96
    Understanding the Problem of “Hype”: Exaggeration, Values, and Trust in Science.Kristen Intemann - 2022 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 52 (3):279-294.
    Several science studies scholars report instances of scientific “hype,” or sensationalized exaggeration, in journal articles, institutional press releases, and science journalism in a variety of fields (e.g., Caulfield and Condit 2012). Yet, how “hype” is being conceived varies. I will argue that hype is best understood as a particular kind of exaggeration, one that explicitly or implicitly exaggerates various positive aspects of science in ways that undermine the goals of science communication in a particular context. This account also makes clear (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  24. Social values and scientific evidence: The case of the HPV vaccines.Kristen Intemann & Inmaculada de Melo-Martín - 2010 - Biology and Philosophy 25 (2):203-213.
    Several have argued that the aims of scientific research are not always independent of social and ethical values. Yet this is often assumed only to have implications for decisions about what is studied, or which research projects are funded, and not for methodological decisions or standards of evidence. Using the case of the recently developed HPV vaccines, we argue that the social aims of research can also play important roles in justifying decisions about (1) how research problems are defined in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   24 citations  
  25.  48
    The Pragmatic and Ethical Barriers to Corporate Social Responsibility Disclosure: The Nike Case.Kristen Bell DeTienne & Lee W. Lewis - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 60 (4):359-376.
    Numerous studies have documented the demand for information regarding corporations’ relationships to society. Much recent research has demonstrated why stakeholders need this information, and how it benefits both companies and the public. These studies suggest numerous methods by which companies can effectively disclose corporate social responsibility (CSR) information to the public, but in practice, reporting this type of information is fraught with legal and ethical uncertainty often unexplored in most literature. This article represents a fresh analysis of the numerous pragmatic (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  26.  67
    Autonomy rights and abortion after the point of viability.Kristen Hine - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (8):787-792.
    It has been argued that Thomson's defense of abortion, if successful, implies that abortion is permissible only until the point of viability. After that point, if one wanted to end a pregnancy, one must do so by birthing the fetus through induction or cesarean. In this paper, I argue that Thomson's defense of abortion does, in fact, imply that abortion after the point of viability is sometimes permissible. To show this, I point out that the process of birthing a fetus (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  27.  22
    Science and Values: Are Value Judgments Always Irrelevant to the Justification of Scientific Claims?Kristen Intemann - 2001 - Philosophy of Science 68 (S3):S506-S518.
    Several feminist theorists have claimed that feminist values ought to influence theory choice. Susan Haack has argued that this is implausible because normative claims about what ought to be the case can never provide justification for descriptive claims. I argue against one of the premises of Haack's argument. Furthermore, I attempt to show that the most promising defense of this premise would cast doubt on a second premise of Haack's argument. My aim is to open up the possibility that value (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  28.  35
    On the parity of structural persistence in language production and comprehension.Kristen M. Tooley & Kathryn Bock - 2014 - Cognition 132 (2):101-136.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  29. Regulating scientific research: should scientists be left alone?Kristen Intemann & Inmaculada de Melo-Martin - 2008 - FASEB Journal 22 (3):654-58.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  30.  13
    Nietzsche and Embodiment: Discerning Bodies and Non-dualism.Kristen Brown - 2012 - SUNY Press.
    In Nietzsche and Embodiment Kristen Brown reveals the smartness of bodies, challenging the traditional view in the West that bodies are separate from and morally inferior to minds. Drawing inspiration from Nietzsche, Brown vividly describes why the interdependence of mind and body matters, both in Nietzsche's writings and for contemporary debates (non-dualism theory, Merleau-Ponty criticism, and metaphor studies), activities (spinal cord research and fasting), and specific human experiences (menses, trauma, and guilt). Brown's theories about the dynamic relationship between body (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31.  22
    The role of language in emotion: predictions from psychological constructionism.Kristen A. Lindquist, Jennifer K. MacCormack & Holly Shablack - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
  32. Man and the state.Edgar L. Hewett - 1944 - Albuquerque,: The University of New Mexico press.
  33.  17
    Music: healing the rift.Ivan Hewett - 2003 - New York: Continuum.
    Given this bewildering abundance, how we can speak of a single thing called "music"? This book argues that we can.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34.  7
    Semantics in language acquisition.Kristen Surett & Sudha Arunachalam (eds.) - 2018 - Philadelphia: John Benjamins.
    This volume presents the state of the art of recent research on the acquisition of semantics. Covering topics ranging from infants' initial acquisition of word meaning to the more sophisticated mapping between structure and meaning in the syntax-semantics interface, and the relation between logical content and inferences on language meaning (semantics and pragmatics), the papers in this volume introduce the reader to the variety of ways in which children come to realize that semantic content is encoded in word meaning (for (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35.  1
    Is undisciplined behavior antithetical to cooperation, or is it part and parcel of it?Kristen L. Syme - 2023 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 46:e315.
    This commentary raises three points in response to the target article. First, what appear to be victimless behaviors in highly individualistic, post-industrial societies might have a direct impact on group members in small-scale societies. Second, many societies show marked tolerance or ambivalence toward intemperate behavior. Third, undisciplined behavior is not antithetical to cooperation but can be used to cooperative ends.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36.  4
    The Perils of Interpreting Comparatives with Pronouns for Children and Adults.Kristen Syrett & Vera Gor - 2019 - In Daniel Altshuler & Jessica Rett (eds.), The Semantics of Plurals, Focus, Degrees, and Times: Essays in Honor of Roger Schwarzschild. Cham: Springer Verlag. pp. 185-216.
    We present the results of three experiments investigating the interpretation of comparative constructions involving pronominal reference in which binding Principle C is violated. We show that both children and adults retrieve interpretations that are not predicted. On the one hand, children appear to represent elided pronominal material functionally instead of in a strict identity relation with a pronoun on the surface, generating interpretations that are entirely unexpected from the perspective of the adult grammar. On the other, adult participants often appear (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37.  21
    Ethical Reasoning in Action: Validity Evidence for the Ethical Reasoning Identification Test.Kristen Smith, Keston Fulcher & Elizabeth Hawk Sanchez - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 144 (2):417-436.
    Professionals in business and law, healthcare providers, educators, policymakers, consumers, and higher education practitioners value ethical reasoning skills. Because of this, we concentrated campus-wide reaccreditation efforts to help students actively engage in ER. In doing so, we re-conceptualized the ER process, implemented campus-wide ER interventions designed to be experienced by all undergraduate students, and created the ethical reasoning identification test to measure students’ ability to engage in a foundational step in the ER process. Using factor analysis, we demonstrated internal validity (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  38.  18
    Comment: Constructionism is a Multilevel Framework for Affective Science.Kristen A. Lindquist & Jennifer K. MacCormack - 2014 - Emotion Review 6 (2):134-135.
    We point out that constructionist models from experimental psychology account for the sociocultural, psychological, and neural levels of analysis in emotion. Individual constructionist models form a “metamodel” that integrates the levels of analysis important to a science of emotion. By clarifying the multilevel nature of constructionism, we hope to help lay a strong foundation for future cross-disciplinary collaborations.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  39.  14
    Forms liberate: reclaiming the jurisprudence of Lon L Fuller.Kristen Rundle - 2012 - Portland, Or.: Hart.
    Reclaiming Fuller -- Before the debate -- The 1958 debate -- The morality of law -- The reply to critics -- Resituating Fuller I : Raz -- Resituating Fuller II : Dworkin -- Three conversations.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  40. On masks and masking: epistemic harms and science communication.Kristen Intemann & Inmaculada de Melo-Martín - 2023 - Synthese 202 (3):1-17.
    During emerging public health crises, both policymakers and members of the public are looking to scientific experts to provide guidance. Even in cases where there are significant uncertainties, there is pressure for experts to “speak with one voice” to avoid confusion, allow officials to make evidence-based decisions rapidly, and encourage public support for such decisions. This can lead experts to engage in masking of information about the state of the science or regarding assumptions involved in policy recommendations. Although experts might (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  41. Doing Gender, Determining Gender: Transgender People, Gender Panics, and the Maintenance of the Sex/gender/sexuality System.Kristen Schilt & Laurel Westbrook - 2014 - Gender and Society 28 (1):32-57.
    This article explores “determining gender,” the umbrella term for social practices of placing others in gender categories. We draw on three case studies showcasing moments of conflict over who counts as a man and who counts as a woman: public debates over the expansion of transgender employment rights, policies determining eligibility of transgender people for competitive sports, and proposals to remove the genital surgery requirement for a change of sex marker on birth certificates. We show that criteria for determining gender (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  42. Stone of Hope.Kristen Bell - 2019 - Harvard Civil Rights Civil Liberties Law Review 54:455-548.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  43.  79
    Why Diversity Matters: Understanding and Applying the Diversity Component of the National Science Foundation’s Broader Impacts Criterion.Kristen Intemann - 2009 - Social Epistemology 23 (3):249-266.
    Despite the National Science Foundation's recent clarification of the Broader Impacts Criterion used in grant evaluation, it is not clear that this criterion is being understood or applied consistently by grant writers or reviewers. In particular, there is still confusion about how to interpret the requirement for broadening the participation of under-represented groups in science and scepticism about the value of doing so. Much of this stems from uncertainty about why the participation of under-represented groups is desirable or beneficial in (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  44.  6
    Untangling the knot: A response to Nanette Funk.Kristen Ghodsee - 2015 - European Journal of Women's Studies 22 (2):248-252.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  45.  18
    Bumbling idiots or evil masterminds? Challenging cold war stereotypes about women, sexuality and state socialism.Kristen Ghodsee & Kateřina Lisková - 2016 - Filozofija I Društvo 27 (3):489-503.
    In academic writing, facts about the past generally require the citation of relevant sources unless the fact or idea is considered?common knowledge:? bits of information or dates upon which there is a wide scholarly consensus. This brief article reflects on the use of?common knowledge? claims in contemporary scholarship about women, families, and sexuality as experienced during 20th century, East European, state socialist regimes. We focus on several key stereotypes about the communist state and the situation of women that are often (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  46.  50
    Extensionality in natural language quantification: the case of many and few.Kristen A. Greer - 2014 - Linguistics and Philosophy 37 (4):315-351.
    This paper presents an extensional account of manyand few that explains data that have previously motivated intensional analyses of these quantifiers :599–620, 2000). The key insight is that their semantic arguments are themselves set intersections: the restrictor is the intersection of the predicates denoted by the N’ or the V’ and the restricted universe, U, and the scope is the intersection of the N’ and V’. Following Cohen, I assume that the universe consists of the union of alternatives to the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  47.  97
    Altruism and the theory of rational action: Rescuers of jews in nazi europe.Kristen R. Monroe, Michael C. Barton & Ute Klingemann - 1990 - Ethics 101 (1):103-122.
  48.  25
    Public Conversation: Aline Kominsky-Crumb and Kristen Schilt.Aline Kominsky-Crumb & Kristen Schilt - 2014 - Critical Inquiry 40 (3):118-131.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49.  11
    Nanotechnology: From “Wow” to “Yuck”?Kristen Kulinowski - 2004 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 24 (1):13-20.
    Nanotechnology is science and engineering resulting from the manipulation of matter’s most basic building blocks: atoms and molecules. As such, nanotechnology promises unprecedented control over both the materials we use and the means of their production. Such control could revolutionize nearly every sector of our economy, including medicine, defense, and energy. Despite the relatively recent emergence of this field, it already enjoys generous federal funding and enthusiastic media coverage. The tenor of discourse on nanotechnology is changing, however, as the voices (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  50. Science and values: Are value judgments always irrelevant to the justification of scientific claims?Kristen Intemann - 2001 - Proceedings of the Philosophy of Science Association 2001 (3):S506-.
    Several feminist theorists have claimed that feminist values ought to influence theory choice. Susan Haack has argued that this is implausible because normative claims about what ought to be the case can never provide justification for descriptive claims. I argue against one of the premises of Haack's argument. Furthermore, I attempt to show that the most promising defense of this premise would cast doubt on a second premise of Haack's argument. My aim is to open up the possibility that value (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
1 — 50 / 522