Results for 'Kriste Kuczynski'

427 found
Order:
  1.  8
    A Paradigm of Investigator Duty to Multiple Stakeholder Participants.Megan Clarke Roberts, Kriste Kuczynski, Gail E. Henderson & Kimberly Foss - 2023 - American Journal of Bioethics 23 (8):58-60.
    In this target article by Morain and Largent (2023), the authors focus on an investigator’s duty to patient-subjects specifically regarding incidental or collateral findings within the context of e...
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  2.  20
    The Promise and Reality of Public Engagement in the Governance of Human Genome Editing Research.John M. Conley, R. Jean Cadigan, Arlene M. Davis, Eric T. Juengst, Kriste Kuczynski, Rami Major, Hayley Stancil, Julio Villa-Palomino, Margaret Waltz & Gail E. Henderson - 2023 - American Journal of Bioethics 23 (7):9-16.
    This paper analyses the activities of five organizations shaping the debate over the global governance of genome editing in order to assess current approaches to public engagement (PE). We compare the recommendations of each group with its own practices. All recommend broad engagement with the general public, but their practices vary from expert-driven models dominated by scientists, experts, and civil society groups to citizen deliberation-driven models that feature bidirectional consultation with local citizens, as well as hybrid models that combine elements (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  3. Cumulative cultural evolution and demography.Krist Vaesen - 2012 - PLoS ONE 7 (7):1-9.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  4. Intuitive physics in motor control and explicit judgment.H. Krist & F. Wilkening - 1989 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 27 (6):525-525.
  5.  50
    Does a Consumer’s Religion Really Matter in the Buyer–Seller Dyad? An Empirical Study Examining the Relationship Between Consumer Religious Commitment, Christian Conservatism and the Ethical Judgment of a Seller’s Controversial Business Decision.Krist R. Swimberghe, Dheeraj Sharma & Laura Willis Flurry - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 102 (4):581-598.
    Religion is an important cultural and individual difference variable. Yet, despite its obvious importance in consumers’ lives, religion in the United States has been under-researched. This study addresses that gap in the literature and investigates the influence of consumer religion in the buyer–seller dyad. Specifically, this study examines the influence of consumer religious commitment and a Christian consumer’s conservative beliefs in the United States on store loyalty when retailers make business decisions which are potentially reli- gious objectionable. This study uses (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  6. A Solution to the Paradox of Causation.John-Michael Kuczynski - 1997 - Philosophy in Science 8 (1):81-182.
    It is shown (i) that causation exists, since we couldn't even ask whether causation existed unless it did; (ii) that any given case of causation is a case of persistence; and (iii) that spatiotemporal relations supervene on causal relations. (ii) is subject to the qualification that we tend not to become aware of instances of causation as such except when two different causal lines---i.e. two different cases of persistence---intersect, resulting in a breakdown of some other case of persistence, this being (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. A Contemporary Defense of the Aristotelean Distinction Between Essential and Non-Essential Attributes.Kriste Taylor - 1982 - Dissertation, State University of New York at Stony Brook
    The distinction between the essential and non-essential attributes of material objects is one that can be traced back to Aristotle. It is the distinction between those attributes or things true of objects that need not be true of them in order for them to endure or persist and those attributes or things true of objects that must remain true of them as long as they can be said truly to exist. ;The claim that individuals themselves have essential and non-essential attributes (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Reference and truth: The case of sexist and racist utterances.Kriste Taylor - 1981 - In Mary Vetterling-Braggin (ed.), Sexist Language: A Modern Philosophical Analysis. Littlefield, Adams. pp. 307--17.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  9. The cognitive bases of human tool use.Krist Vaesen - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (4):203-262.
    This article has two goals. First, it synthesizes and critically assesses current scientific knowledge about the cognitive bases of human tool use. Second, it shows how the cognitive traits reviewed help to explain why technological accumulation evolved so markedly in humans, and so modestly in apes.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   45 citations  
  10. Cooperative feeding and breeding, and the evolution of executive control.Krist Vaesen - 2012 - Biology and Philosophy 27 (1):115-124.
    Dubreuil (Biol Phil 25:53–73, 2010b , this journal) argues that modern-like cognitive abilities for inhibitory control and goal maintenance most likely evolved in Homo heidelbergensis , much before the evolution of oft-cited modern traits, such as symbolism and art. Dubreuil’s argument proceeds in two steps. First, he identifies two behavioral traits that are supposed to be indicative of the presence of a capacity for inhibition and goal maintenance: cooperative feeding and cooperative breeding. Next, he tries to show that these behavioral (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  11. Formal operations and simulated thought.John-Michael Kuczynski - 2006 - Philosophical Explorations 9 (2):221-234.
    A series of representations must be semantics-driven if the members of that series are to combine into a single thought: where semantics is not operative, there is at most a series of disjoint representations that add up to nothing true or false, and therefore do not constitute a thought at all. A consequence is that there is necessarily a gulf between simulating thought, on the one hand, and actually thinking, on the other. A related point is that a popular doctrine (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  34
    Are any of our beliefs about ourselves non-inferential or infallible?John-Michael Kuczynski - 2001 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 21 (1):20-45.
    We are aware of truths (e.g. the truth that the shoes I'm now wearing are uncomfortably tight) and also of states of affairs (e.g. the uncomfortable tightness of said shoes). My awareness of the tightness of my shoes---not, be it emphasized, of the corresponding truth, but of the shoe-related mass-energy-distribution underlying that truth---is an instance, not of truth-awareness, but of fact-awareness or, as I prefer to put, object-awareness. The aforementioned truth-awareness corresponding to that object-awareness is the result of my conceptualizing (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  53
    Two objections to materialism.John-Michael Kuczynski - 2000 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 20 (2):122-139.
    This paper puts forth two reasons to hold that at least some mental entities are not physical entities. First argument: Some mental entities (namely, pains and other qualia) cannot possibly differ from how they seem to be, and since this cannot possibly be true of any non-mental entity, it follows that some mental entities are not physical. Second argument: It is necessarily on theoretical grounds, as opposed to strictly experiential grounds, that mental entities are identified with physical entities. Water is (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Die Rolle der Volksmassen in der Geschichte.Jürgen Kuczynski - 1984 - Berlin: Akademie Verlag.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Prolegomena zu einer Geschichte der Wissenschaft: [Vortr. gehalten anlässl. d. Karl-Marx-Vorlesung am 9. Mai 1974].Jürgen Kuczynski - 1974 - Berlin: Akademie Verlag.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  16.  7
    Worlds in collision.Kriste Taylor - 1983 - Philosophia 13 (3-4):289-297.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  17. Implicit comparatives and the Sorites.John-Michael Kuczynski - 2006 - History and Philosophy of Logic 27 (1):1-8.
    A person with one dollar is poor. If a person with n dollars is poor, then so is a person with n + 1 dollars. Therefore, a person with a billion dollars is poor. True premises, valid reasoning, a false a conclusion. This is an instance of the Sorites-paradox. (There are infinitely many such paradoxes. A man with an IQ of 1 is unintelligent. If a man with an IQ of n is unintelligent, so is a man with an IQ (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18.  1
    Die Praxis der Philosophie.Janusz Kuczyński - 1978 - Deutsche Zeitschrift für Philosophie 26 (10):1304.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19.  6
    Contrasting preschoolers’ verbal reasoning in an object-individuation task with young infants’ preverbal feats.Horst Krist, Karoline Karl & Markus Krüger - 2016 - Cognition 157 (C):205-218.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  20.  33
    The National Science Foundation and philosophy of science's withdrawal from social concerns.Krist Vaesen & Joel Katzav - 2019 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 78 (C):73-82.
    At some point during the 1950s, mainstream American philosophy of science began increasingly to avoid questions about the role of non-cognitive values in science and, accordingly, increasingly to avoid active engagement with social, political and moral concerns. Such questions and engagement eventually ceased to be part of the mainstream. Here we show that the eventual dominance of 'value-free' philosophy of science can be attributed, at least in part, to the policies of the U.S. National Science Foundation's "History and Philosophy of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  21. The Reliability of Armchair Intuitions.Krist Vaesen, Martin Peterson & Bart Van Bezooijen - 2013 - Metaphilosophy 44 (5):559-578.
    Armchair philosophers have questioned the significance of recent work in experimental philosophy by pointing out that experiments have been conducted on laypeople and undergraduate students. To challenge a practice that relies on expert intuitions, so the armchair objection goes, one needs to demonstrate that expert intuitions rather than those of ordinary people are sensitive to contingent facts such as cultural, linguistic, socio-economic, or educational background. This article does exactly that. Based on two empirical studies on populations of 573 and 203 (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  22.  31
    A Solution to the Paradox of Analysis.John-Michael Kuczynski - 1998 - Metaphilosophy 29 (4):313-330.
    This essay attempts to solve the so‐called paradox of analysis: if one is to have any questions about x, one must know x; but if one knows x, one has no questions about x. The obvious solution is this: one can inquire into x if one knows some, but not all, of x's parts. But this solution is erroneous. Let x′ be those parts of x with which one is acquainted, and let S be the percipient in question. As with (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  23.  5
    Nietzsche and War.Jan Krist - 2018 - E-Logos 25 (2):4-14.
    V obecném povědomí je Friedrich Nietzsche považován za jednoho z největších apologetů války v dějinách lidského myšlení. Avšak skutečnost je jiná, pokud chápeme fenomén války u Nietzscheho v celkovém kontextu jeho myšlení. Nietzsche válce rozumí ve třech rovinách. Prostřednictvím motivu vůle k moci chápe boj obecně jako metafysický princip; v motivu nadčlověka vystupuje válka jako boj se sebou samým, sebevytváření; teprve v motivu střetávání dvou typů morálek (panské a rabské) hovoří o válce jako důležitém prostředku - až zde ji Nietzsche (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24.  32
    The internalization of physical constraints from a developmental perspective.Horst Krist - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (4):681-682.
    Shepard's internalization concept is defended against Hecht's criticisms. By ignoring both Shepard's evolutionary perspective and the fact that internalization does not preclude modularization, Hecht advances inconclusive evidence. Developmental research supports Shepard's conclusion that kinematic geometry may be more deeply internalized than physical dynamics. This research also suggests that the internalization concept should be broadened to include representations acquired during ontogeny. [Hecht; Shepard].
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. The functional bias of the dual nature of technical artefacts program.Krist Vaesen - 2011 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 42 (1):190-197.
    In 2006, in a special issue of this journal, several authors explored what they called the dual nature of artefacts. The core idea is simple, but attractive: to make sense of an artefact, one needs to consider both its physical nature—its being a material object—and its intentional nature—its being an entity designed to further human ends and needs. The authors construe the intentional component quite narrowly, though: it just refers to the artefact’s function, its being a means to realize a (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  26. Giere's (In)Appropriation of Distributed Cognition.Krist Vaesen - 2011 - Social Epistemology 25 (4):379 - 391.
    Ronald Giere embraces the perspective of distributed cognition to think about cognition in the sciences. I argue that his conception of distributed cognition is flawed in that it bears all the marks of its predecessor; namely, individual cognition. I show what a proper (i.e. non-individual) distributed framework looks like, and highlight what it can and cannot do for the philosophy of science.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  27. Chapter 12 Introduction.Joel Katzav & Krist Vaesen - 2023 - In Joel Katzav, Dorothy Rogers & Krist Vaesen (eds.), Knowledge, Mind and Reality: An Introduction by Early Twentieth-Century American Women Philosophers. Cham: Springer. pp. 117-129.
    This chapter introduces the articles by Marie C. Swabey, Thelma Z. Lavine, Grace A. de Laguna and Dorothy Walsh on the objectivity of scientific knowledge. We will see Swabey placing herself outside the historicist traditions of (later) authors (e.g., Thomas Kuhn), and arguing that the rationality and objectivity of science are grounded in synthetic a priori justified logical principles. Lavine and de Laguna, by contrast, embrace socio-historical approaches to the study of science, thus anticipating later developments in philosophy of science. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  55
    Optimality vs. intent: Limitations of Dennett's artifact hermeneutics.Krist Vaesen & Melissa van Amerongen - 2008 - Philosophical Psychology 21 (6):779 – 797.
    Dennett has argued that when people interpret artifacts and other designed objects ( such as biological items ) they rely on optimality considerations , rather than on designer's intentions. On his view , we infer an item's function by finding out what it is best at; and such functional attribution is more reliable than when we depend on the intention it was developed with. This paper examines research in cognitive psychology and archaeology , and argues that Dennett's account is implausible. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  29.  29
    Consumer Religiosity: Consequences for Consumer Activism in the United States. [REVIEW]Krist Swimberghe, Laura A. Flurry & Janna M. Parker - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 103 (3):453-467.
    In recent times, organizations have experienced consumer backlash as a result of decisions to support controversial causes. To date, little research has attempted to explain consumers’ negative response as a function of religion. This study addresses that gap in the literature and examines consumer religious commitment and Christian consumers’ conservative beliefs in the United States as motivating factors for consumer activist behavior and boycott participation. Findings from a national sample of 531 consumers suggest that consumers evaluate seller’s actions and form (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  30. Robust! -- Handle with care.Wybo Houkes & Krist Vaesen - 2012 - Philosophy of Science 79 (3):1-20.
    Michael Weisberg has argued that robustness analysis is useful in evaluating both scientific models and their implications and that robustness analysis comes in three types that share their form and aim. We argue for three cautionary claims regarding Weisberg's reconstruction: robustness analysis may be of limited or no value in evaluating models and their implications; the unificatory reconstruction conceals that the three types of robustness differ in form and role; there is no confluence of types of robustness. We illustrate our (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  31.  33
    French Neopositivism and the Logic, Psychology, and Sociology of Scientific Discovery.Krist Vaesen - 2021 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 11 (1):183-200.
    This article is concerned with one of the notable but forgotten research strands that developed out of French nineteenth-century positivism, a strand that turned attention to the study of scientific discovery and was actively pursued by French epistemologists around the turn of the nineteenth century. I first sketch the context in which this research program emerged. I show that the program was a natural offshoot of French neopositivism; the latter was a current of twentieth-century thought that, even if implicitly, challenged (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  32.  43
    Dewey on extended cognition and epistemology.Krist Vaesen - 2014 - Philosophical Issues 24 (1):426-438.
    There is a surge of attempts to draw out the epistemological consequences of views according to which cognition is deeply embedded, embodied and/or extended. The principal machinery used for doing so is that of analytic epistemology. Here I argue that Dewey's pragmatic epistemology may be better fit to the task. I start by pointing out the profound similarities between Dewey's view on cognition and that emerging from literature of more recent date. Crucially, the benefit of looking at Dewey is that (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  33. On the emergence of American analytic philosophy.Joel Katzav & Krist Vaesen - 2017 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 25 (4):772-798.
    ABSTRACTThis paper is concerned with the reasons for the emergence and dominance of analytic philosophy in America. It closely examines the contents of, and changing editors at, The Philosophical Review, and provides a perspective on the contents of other leading philosophy journals. It suggests that analytic philosophy emerged prior to the 1950s in an environment characterized by a rich diversity of approaches to philosophy and that it came to dominate American philosophy at least in part due to its effective promotion (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  34. Risk and trust.Philip J. Nickel & Krist Vaesen - 2012 - In Sabine Roeser, Rafaela Hillerbrand, Martin Peterson & Per Sandin (eds.), Handbook of Risk Theory. Springer.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  35. The rise of logical empiricist philosophy of science and the fate of speculative philosophy of science.Joel Katzav & Krist Vaesen - 2022 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 12 (2):000-000.
    This paper contributes to explaining the rise of logical empiricism in mid-twentieth century (North) America and to a better understanding of American philosophy of science before the dominance of logical empiricism. We show that, contrary to a number of existing histories, philosophy of science was already a distinct subfield of philosophy, one with its own approaches and issues, even before logical empiricists arrived in America. It was a form of speculative philosophy with a concern for speculative metaphysics, normative issues relating (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  36.  12
    A new framework for teaching scientific reasoning to students from application-oriented sciences.Wybo Houkes & Krist Vaesen - 2021 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 11 (2):1-16.
    About three decades ago, the late Ronald Giere introduced a new framework for teaching scientific reasoning to science students. Giere’s framework presents a model-based alternative to the traditional statement approach—in which scientific inferences are reconstructed as explicit arguments, composed of (single-sentence) premises and a conclusion. Subsequent research in science education has shown that model-based approaches are particularly effective in teaching science students how to understand and evaluate scientific reasoning. One limitation of Giere’s framework, however, is that it covers only one (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  37.  28
    The Influence of Religiosity on Consumer Ethical Judgments and Responses Toward Sexual Appeals.Sanjay Putrevu & Krist Swimberghek - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 115 (2):351-365.
    This research explores the influence of religiosity on consumer perception of, and response toward, sexual appeals. The first study (survey, national sample; n = 423) examines the relationship between religiosity and consumer response toward sexual appeals using causal modeling. Study 1 finds that high intrinsic religiosity consumers exhibit more adverse ethical judgments toward the company’s use of sexual appeals and these judgments, in turn, result in inferior attitudes and purchase intent toward the advertised brand. To confirm and expand on these (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  38.  9
    World Congresses of Philosophy.Venant Cauchy & Janusz Kuczynski - 1985 - Philosophy Today 29 (1):28-36.
  39. MORAL STRUCTURE OF LEGAL OBLIGATION.Kuczynski John-Michael - 2006 - Dissertation, University of California, Santa Barbara
    What are laws, and do they necessarily have any basis in morality? The present work argues that laws are governmental assurances of protections of rights and that concepts of law and legal obligation must therefore be understood in moral terms. There are, of course, many immoral laws. But once certain basic truths are taken into account – in particular, that moral principles have a “dimension of weight”, to use an expression of Ronald Dworkin’s, and also that principled relations are not (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  43
    What exists in the environment that motivates the emergence, transmission, and sophistication of tool use?Tetsushi Nonaka & Krist Vaesen - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (4):233.
    In his attempt to find cognitive traits that set humans apart from nonhuman primates with respect to tool use, Vaesen overlooks the primacy of the environment toward the use of which behavior evolves. The occurrence of a particular behavior is a result of how that behavior has evolved in a complex and changing environment selected by a unique population.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. A letter to his holiness Pope John PaulL II.J. Szczepanski & J. Kuczynski - 2001 - Dialogue and Universalism 11 (9-10):5-6.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. Kuczynski’s Law of Economics: If It isn’t necessary, its non-existence is.John-Michael Kuczynski - 2018 - Madison, WI, USA:
    If It isn’t necessary, its non-existence is.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43. Knowledge without credit, exhibit 4: Extended cognition. [REVIEW]Krist Vaesen - 2011 - Synthese 181 (3):515-529.
    The Credit Theory of Knowledge (CTK)—as expressed by such figures as John Greco, Wayne Riggs, and Ernest Sosa—holds that knowing that p implies deserving epistemic credit for truly believing that p . Opponents have presented three sorts of counterexamples to CTK: S might know that p without deserving credit in cases of (1) innate knowledge (Lackey, Kvanvig); (2) testimonial knowledge (Lackey); or (3) perceptual knowledge (Pritchard). The arguments of Lackey, Kvanvig and Pritchard, however, are effective only in so far as (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   55 citations  
  44. Modelling the truth of scientific beliefs with cultural evolutionary theory.Krist Vaesen & Wybo Houkes - 2014 - Synthese 191 (1).
    Evolutionary anthropologists and archaeologists have been considerably successful in modelling the cumulative evolution of culture, of technological skills and knowledge in particular. Recently, one of these models has been introduced in the philosophy of science by De Cruz and De Smedt (Philos Stud 157:411–429, 2012), in an attempt to demonstrate that scientists may collectively come to hold more truth-approximating beliefs, despite the cognitive biases which they individually are known to be subject to. Here we identify a major shortcoming in that (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  45.  26
    Complexity and technological evolution: What everybody knows?Krist Vaesen & Wybo Houkes - 2017 - Biology and Philosophy 32 (6):1245-1268.
    The consensus among cultural evolutionists seems to be that human cultural evolution is cumulative, which is commonly understood in the specific sense that cultural traits, especially technological traits, increase in complexity over generations. Here we argue that there is insufficient credible evidence in favor of or against this technological complexity thesis. For one thing, the few datasets that are available hardly constitute a representative sample. For another, they substantiate very specific, and usually different versions of the complexity thesis or, even (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  46. How norms in technology ought to be interpreted.Krist Vaesen - 2006 - Techne 10 (1):117-133.
    This paper defends the claim that there are — at least — two kinds of normativity in technological practice. The first concerns what engineers ought to do and the second concerns normative statements about artifacts. The claim is controversial, since the standard approach to normativity, namely normative realism, actually denies artifacts any kind of normativity; according to the normative realist, normativity applies exclusively to human agents. In other words, normative realists hold that only “human agent normativity” is a genuine form (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  47.  10
    Demographic explanations of neanderthal extinction: a reply to Currie and Meneganzin.Krist Vaesen - 2023 - Biology and Philosophy 38 (2):1-6.
    In a recent paper, Currie and Meneganzin (Biol Phil, 2022, 37, 50) critically engage with a recent demographic explanation of the demise of Neanderthals (Vaesen et al. 2019). Currie and Meneganzin suggest that, contrary to how it is (supposedly) presented, Vaesen et al.’s explanation is not (and in fact, could never be) ‘stand-alone’, i.e., competition and environmental factors always interfere with demographic ones. Here I argue that Currie and Meneganzin misconstrue what the study in question does and does not purport (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48.  28
    From individual cognition to populational culture.Krist Vaesen - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (4):245-262.
    In my response to the commentaries from a collection of esteemed researchers, I reassess and eventually find largely intact my claim that human tool use evidences higher social and non-social cognitive ability. Nonetheless, I concede that my examination of individual-level cognitive traits does not offer a full explanation of cumulative culture yet. For that, one needs to incorporate them into population-dynamic models of cultural evolution. I briefly describe my current and future work on this.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  49.  3
    Janusz Kuczyński, Homo creator. Wstęp do dialektyki człowieka (Homo creator. An Introduction into the Dialectics of Man). [REVIEW]Janusz Kuczyński & Barbara Ochalska - 1977 - Dialectics and Humanism 4 (3):179-183.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50.  41
    Janusz Kuczyński, Homo creator. Wstęp do dialektyki człowieka (Homo creator. An Introduction into the Dialectics of Man). [REVIEW]Janusz Kuczyński - 1977 - Dialectics and Humanism 4 (3):179-183.
1 — 50 / 427