72 found
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  1.  98
    Justice Without Borders: Cosmopolitanism, Nationalism, and Patriotism.Kok-Chor Tan - 2004 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    The cosmopolitan idea of justice is commonly accused of not taking seriously the special ties and commitments of nationality and patriotism. This is because the ideal of impartial egalitarianism, which is central to the cosmopolitan view, seems to be directly opposed to the moral partiality inherent to nationalism and patriotism. In this book, Kok-Chor Tan argues that cosmopolitan justice, properly understood, can accommodate and appreciate nationalist and patriotic commitments, setting limits for these commitments without denying their moral significance. This book (...)
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  2. An ethical framework for global vaccine allocation.Ezekiel J. Emanuel, Govind Persad, Adam Kern, Allen E. Buchanan, Cecile Fabre, Daniel Halliday, Joseph Heath, Lisa M. Herzog, R. J. Leland, Ephrem T. Lemango, Florencia Luna, Matthew McCoy, Ole F. Norheim, Trygve Ottersen, G. Owen Schaefer, Kok-Chor Tan, Christopher Heath Wellman, Jonathan Wolff & Henry S. Richardson - 2020 - Science 1:DOI: 10.1126/science.abe2803.
    In this article, we propose the Fair Priority Model for COVID-19 vaccine distribution, and emphasize three fundamental values we believe should be considered when distributing a COVID-19 vaccine among countries: Benefiting people and limiting harm, prioritizing the disadvantaged, and equal moral concern for all individuals. The Priority Model addresses these values by focusing on mitigating three types of harms caused by COVID-19: death and permanent organ damage, indirect health consequences, such as health care system strain and stress, as well as (...)
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  3.  97
    Justice, Institutions, and Luck: The Site, Ground, and Scope of Equality.Kok-Chor Tan - 2012 - Oxford, GB: Oxford University Press.
    Kok-Chor Tan addresses three key questions in political philosophy: Where does distributive equality matter? Why does it matter? And among whom does it matter? He argues for an institutional site for egalitarian justice, a luck-egalitarian ideal of why equality matters, and a global scope for distributive justice.
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  4. A Defense of Luck Egalitarianism.Kok-Chor Tan - 2008 - Journal of Philosophy 105 (11):665-690.
  5. What are the obligations of pharmaceutical companies in a global health emergency?Ezekiel J. Emanuel, Allen Buchanan, Shuk Ying Chan, Cécile Fabre, Daniel Halliday, Joseph Heath, Lisa Herzog, R. J. Leland, Matthew S. McCoy, Ole F. Norheim, Carla Saenz, G. Owen Schaefer, Kok-Chor Tan, Christopher Heath Wellman, Jonathan Wolff & Govind Persad - 2021 - Lancet 398 (10304):1015.
    All parties involved in researching, developing, manufacturing, and distributing COVID-19 vaccines need guidance on their ethical obligations. We focus on pharmaceutical companies' obligations because their capacities to research, develop, manufacture, and distribute vaccines make them uniquely placed for stemming the pandemic. We argue that an ethical approach to COVID-19 vaccine production and distribution should satisfy four uncontroversial principles: optimising vaccine production, including development, testing, and manufacturing; fair distribution; sustainability; and accountability. All parties' obligations should be coordinated and mutually consistent. For (...)
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  6.  46
    On the Ethics of Vaccine Nationalism: The Case for the Fair Priority for Residents Framework.Ezekiel J. Emanuel, Allen Buchanan, Shuk Ying Chan, Cécile Fabre, Daniel Halliday, R. J. Leland, Florencia Luna, Matthew S. McCoy, Ole F. Norheim, G. Owen Schaefer, Kok-Chor Tan & Christopher Heath Wellman - 2021 - Ethics and International Affairs 35 (4):543-562.
    COVID-19 vaccines are likely to be scarce for years to come. Many countries, from India to the U.K., have demonstrated vaccine nationalism. What are the ethical limits to this vaccine nationalism? Neither extreme nationalism nor extreme cosmopolitanism is ethically justifiable. Instead, we propose the fair priority for residents framework, in which governments can retain COVID-19 vaccine doses for their residents only to the extent that they are needed to maintain a noncrisis level of mortality while they are implementing reasonable public (...)
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  7.  59
    Justice and Personal Pursuits.Kok-Chor Tan - 2004 - Journal of Philosophy 101 (7):331-362.
  8.  64
    Crisis Nationalism: To What Degree Is National Partiality Justifiable during a Global Pandemic?Eilidh Beaton, Mike Gadomski, Dylan Manson & Kok-Chor Tan - 2021 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 24 (1):285-300.
    Are countries especially entitled, if not obliged, to prioritize the interests or well-being of their own citizens during a global crisis, such as a global pandemic? We call this partiality for compatriots in times of crisis “crisis nationalism”. Vaccine nationalism is one vivid example of crisis nationalism during the COVID-19 pandemic; so is the case of the US government’s purchasing a 3-month supply of the global stock of the antiviral Remdesivir for domestic use. Is crisis nationalism justifiable at all, and, (...)
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  9.  38
    Toleration, Diversity, and Global Justice.Kok-Chor Tan - 2000 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    The "comprehensive liberalism" defended in this book offers an alternative to the narrower "political liberalism" associated with the writings of John Rawls. By arguing against making tolerance as fundamental a value as individual autonomy, and extending the reach of liberalism to global society, it opens the way for dealing more adequately with problems of human rights and economic inequality in a world of cultural pluralism.
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  10. The Duty to Protect.Kok-Chor Tan - 2005 - In Terry Nardin & Melissa S. Williams (eds.), Humanitarian Intervention: Nomos Xlvii. New York University Press.
    Debates on humanitarian intervention have focused on the permissibility question. In this paper, I ask whether intervention can be a moral duty, and if it is a moral duty, how this duty is to be distributed and assigned. With respect to the first question, I contemplate whether an intervention that has met the "permissibility" condition is also for this reason necessary and obligatory. If so, the gap between permission and obligation closes in the case of humanitarian intervention. On the second (...)
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  11. Colonialism, Reparations and Global Justice.Kok-Chor Tan - 2007 - In Jon Miller & Rahul Kumar (eds.), Reparations: interdisciplinary inquiries. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 280--306.
    This chapter examines two basic philosophical challenges for the idea of reparations for past injustices (using colonialism as the focal point). The first challenge is that requiring people today to make reparations for an injustice they themselves did not commit is unfair. The second is that if reparative claims are invoked because of lingering injustices, then recalling the past is in fact normatively redundant if lingering present injustices can be handled by forward-looking principles. In response to the first challenge, I (...)
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  12.  41
    Climate Reparations: Why the polluter pays principle is neither unfair nor unreasonable.Kok-Chor Tan - 2023 - WIREs Climate Change 14 (4).
    The polluter pays principle (PPP) has the form of a reparative principle. It holds that since some countries have historically contributed more to global warming than others, these countries have the follow-up responsibility now to do more to address climate change. Yet in the climate justice debate, PPP is often rejected for two reasons. First, so the objection goes, it wrongly burdens present-day individuals because the actions of their predecessors. This is the unfairness objection. The second objection is that early (...)
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  13. Liberal toleration in Rawls's law of peoples.Kok-Chor Tan - 1998 - Ethics 108 (2):276-295.
  14. Luck, Institutions, and Global Distributive Justice.Kok-Chor Tan - 2011 - European Journal of Political Theory 10 (3):394-421.
    Luck egalitarianism provides one powerful way of defending global egalitarianism. The basic luck egalitarian idea that persons ought not to be disadvantaged compared to others on account of his or her bad luck seems to extend naturally to the global arena, where random factors such as persons’ place of birth and the natural distribution of the world’s resources do affect differentially their life chances. Yet luck egalitarianism as an ideal, as well as its global application, has come under severe criticisms (...)
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  15. The Problem of Decent Peoples.Kok-Chor Tan - 2006 - In Rex Martin & David A. Reidy (eds.), Rawls's Law of Peoples: A Realistic Utopia? Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell.
     
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  16. Kantian Ethics and Global Justice.Kok-Chor Tan - 1997 - Social Theory and Practice 23 (1):53-73.
    Kant divides moral duties into duties of virtue and duties of justice. Duties of virtue are imperfect duties, the fulfillment of which is left to agent discretion and so cannot be externally demanded of one. Duties of justice, while perfect, seem to be restricted to negative duties (of nondeception and noncoercion). It may seem then that Kant's moral philosophy cannot meet the demands of global justice. I argue, however, that Kantian justice when applied to the social and historical realities of (...)
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  17. Liberal nationalism and cosmopolitan justice.Kok-Chor Tan - 2002 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 5 (4):431-461.
    Many liberals have argued that a cosmopolitan perspective on global justice follows from the basic liberal principles of justice. Yet, increasingly, it is also said that intrinsic to liberalism is a doctrine of nationalism. This raises a potential problem for the liberal defense of cosmopolitan justice as it is commonly believed that nationalism and cosmopolitanism are conflicting ideals. If this is correct, there appears to be a serious tension within liberal philosophy itself, between its cosmopolitan aspiration on the one hand, (...)
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  18.  11
    The Problem of Decent Peoples.Kok-Chor Tan - 2006-01-01 - In Rex Martin & David A. Reidy (eds.), Rawls's Law of Peoples. Blackwell. pp. 76–94.
    This chapter contains section titled: Decent Peoples The Idea of Toleration The Cosmopolitan Critique Intervention and Cosmopolitanism Acknowledgments Notes.
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  19. National responsibility, reparations and distributive justice.Kok-Chor Tan - 2008 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 11 (4):449-464.
    I argue that an account of national responsibility, as both collective and inheritable, that allows for making sense of holding nations responsible as an entity for past international injustices and to make reparations for these injustices is not at odds with the demands of global egalitarianism. A global distributive commitment does not deny this account of national responsibility; to the contrary, we can properly appreciate the scope of national responsibility only in light of what global justice truly demands. Thus while (...)
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  20. The demands of justice and national allegiances.Kok-Chor Tan - 2005 - In Gillian Brock & Harry Brighouse (eds.), The Political Philosophy of Cosmopolitanism. New York: Cambridge University Press.
     
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  21.  58
    Boundary making and equal concern.Kok-Chor Tan - 2005 - Metaphilosophy 36 (1‐2):50-67.
    Liberal nationalism is a boundary‐making project, and a feature of this boundary‐making enterprise is the belief that the compatriots have a certain priority over strangers. For this reason it is often thought that liberal nationalism cannot be compatible with the demands of global egalitarianism. In this essay, I examine the sense in which liberal nationalism privileges compatriots, and I argue that, properly understood, the idea of partiality for compatriots in the context of liberal nationalism is not at odds with global (...)
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  22.  20
    Kantian Ethics and Global Justice.Kok-Chor Tan - 1997 - Social Theory and Practice 23 (1):53-73.
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  23. Duties of Climate Justice under Non-ideal Conditions.Kok-Chor Tan - 2015 - In Jeremy Moss (ed.), Climate Change and Justice. Cambridge University Press. pp. 129-147.
    On what we may call the institutional approach to justice, the most important duty of justice that individuals have is the duty to establish just institutions when they are absent. How should we understand this institutional duty in relation to more personal moral actions, such as taking direct personal action to mitigate institutional failures? Is this institutional duty a necessary responsibility of justice? Is it sufficient? I will discuss this question in the context of climate change: what responsibilities of justice (...)
     
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  24. The Contours of Toleration: A Relational Account.Kok-Chor Tan - 2018 - In Manuel Knoll, Stephen Snyder & Nurdane Şimşek (eds.), New Perspectives on Distributive Justice: Deep Disagreements, Pluralism, and the Problem of Consensus. Berlin, Germany: De Gruyter. pp. 385-402.
    I outline what I call a relational account of toleration. This relational account helps explain the apparent paradox of toleration in that it involves two competing moral stances, of acceptance and disapproval, towards the tolerated. It also helps clarify the way toleration is a normative ideal, and not a position one is forced into out of the practical need to accommodate or accept. Specifically, toleration is recommended out of respect for that which the tolerant agent also disapproves of. This combination (...)
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  25. Rights, harm, and institutions.Kok-Chor Tan - 2010 - In Alison M. Jaggar (ed.), Thomas Pogge and His Critics. Malden, MA: Polity.
  26. The Boundary of Justice and The Justice of Boundaries.Kok-Chor Tan - 2006 - Canadian Journal of Law and Jurisprudence 29 (2):319-344.
    Two classes of arguments are often deployed by the anti-global egalitarians against attempts to universalize the demands of distributive equality. One are arguments attempting to show that global egalitarians have misconstrued the reasons for why equality matters domestically, and hence have wrongly extended these reasons to the global arena. These arguments hold that the boundary of distributive justice is effectively coextensive with the boundaries of state. The other are arguments that attempt to show that membership in political societies generates special (...)
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  27.  31
    Nationalisme libéral et internationalisme égalitaire.Kok-Chor Tan - 2007 - Philosophiques 34 (1):113-131.
  28. Obligations in a global health emergency - Authors’ reply.Ezekiel Emanuel, Cecile Fabre, Lisa M. Herzog, Ole F. Norheim, Govind Persad, G. Owen Schaefer & Kok-Chor Tan - 2021 - Lancet 398 (10316):2072.
    In response to commentators, we argue that whether waiving patent rights will meaningfully improve access to COVID-19 vaccines for low income and middle-income countries (LMICs), particularly in the short term, is an empirical matter. We also reject preferentially allocating vaccines to countries that hosted trials because doing so unethically favours those with research infrastructure, rather than those facing the worst burdens from COVID-19.
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  29. Critical Notice: John Rawls, The Law of Peoples.Kok-Chor Tan - 2001 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 31 (1):113-132.
    This review essay on John Rawls’s The Law of Peoples focuses on two of its more contentious claims. The first is that international economic justice is secured by a principle of assistance and that a principle of distributive justice will in fact have “unacceptable” results. The other is that certain non-liberal societies, or peoples, fall within the limits of international toleration. The essay evaluates and critiques these claims from a liberal cosmopolitan perspective.
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  30.  72
    Global Justice and the Problems of Humanity.Kok-Chor Tan - 2018 - Journal of Social Philosophy 49 (3):415-425.
    This paper proposes a problem-based approach to theorizing about global justice as opposed to what I call a paradigm-based approach. The latter confronts questions of global justice from an established ideal of justice normally constructed for the domestic context. The problem-based approach engages global justice issues without the presumption that that they must be accessible from an established (domestic) framework of justice. One advantage of the problem-based approach is that it does not foreclose engagement with practical matters (by defining some (...)
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  31. International Toleration: Rawlsian versus Cosmopolitan.Kok-Chor Tan - 2005 - Leiden Journal of International Law 18 (4):685-710.
    How should liberal societies respond to nonliberal ones? In this paper I examine John Rawls’s conception of international toleration against what is sometimes called a cosmopolitan one. Rawls holds that a just international order should recognize certain nonliberal societies, to which he refers as decent peoples, as equal members in good standing in a just society of peoples. It would be a violation of liberalism’s own principle of toleration to deny the international legitimacy of decent peoples who, among other things, (...)
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  32.  30
    What is This Thing Called Global Justice?Kok-Chor Tan - 2017 - Routledge.
    _What is this thing called Global Justice?_ explores the core topics covered on the increasingly popular undergraduate modules on global justice including: world poverty economic inequality nationalism human rights humanitarian intervention immigration global democracy and governance climate change international justice. Centered on real world problems, this textbook helps students to understand that global justice is not only a field of philosophical inquiry but also of practical importance. Each chapter concludes with a helpful summary of the main ideas discussed, study questions (...)
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  33. Patriotic Obligations.Kok-Chor Tan - 2003 - The Monist 86 (3):434-453.
    It is commonly believed that people have special obligations to their compatriots that are both distinct from and stronger than the general duties they owe to individuals at large. Thus, it is often thought that these special obligations may legitimately limit what global distributive justice can demand of people, including those from well-off countries. Henceforth by special obligations, I mean specifically special obligations to com- patriots, which I will also call patriotic obligations, or patriotism for short.
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  34.  46
    Equality and Special Concern.Kok-Chor Tan - 2010 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 40 (S1):73-98.
    IntroductionThe various special concerns and commitments that individuals ordinarily have, for example towards family members, friends, and possibly compatriots, present an interesting challenge for justice. Justice, after all, is said to be blind and imposes demands on persons that ought to be impartial, at least in some respects, to personal ties and relationships. Yet individual special concerns are obviously of moral importance and are deeply valued by participants in these relationships. Thus any conception of justice to be plausible has to (...)
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  35. Enforcing Cosmopolitan Justice: the problem of intervention.Kok-Chor Tan - 2010 - In Roland Pierik & Wouter Werner (eds.), Cosmopolitanism in Context: Perspectives from International Law and Political Theory. Cambridge University Press.
  36.  35
    Justice Between Sites of Justice.Kok-Chor Tan - 2016 - Law and Philosophy 35 (3):291-311.
    Michael Blake argues that states are the primary sites of justice for persons and that the function of international justice is to ensure that states interact with each other in ways that preserve the capacity of each to realize justice for their own members. This paper will argue that justice among states requires more of states than that they preserve and maintain each other's capacity as primary sites of justice. Justice among states will require some justification, as well, of the (...)
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  37. Humanitarian Intervention as a Duty.Kok-Chor Tan - 2015 - Global Responsibility to Protect 7 (2):121-141.
    Assuming an international commitment to intervene in severe and urgent humanitarian emergencies, as expressed by the doctrine ‘The Responsibility to Protect’, I discuss two objections that the duty to intervene is nonetheless a duty that is easily limited by other moral considerations. One objection is that this duty will exceed the reasonable limits of any obligation given the high personal cost of intervention. The other objection is that any duty to intervene will be an imperfect duty, and therefore not a (...)
     
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  38. Global Democracy: International, Not Cosmopolitan.Kok-Chor Tan - 2008 - In Deen Chatterjee (ed.), Democracy in a Global World. Rowman&Littlefield.
  39.  82
    Cosmopolitan Impartiality and Patriotic Partiality.Kok-Chor Tan - 2005 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 35 (sup1):165-192.
    Cosmopolitanism, as a moral idea, holds that individuals are the ultimate units of moral worth and are entitled to equal consideration, regardless of contingencies such as citizenship or nationality. In one common interpretation, cosmopolitan justice not only regards individuals as the basic subjects of moral concern, but it also requires distributive principles to transcend national affiliations and to apply equally to all persons of the world. As Simon Caney puts it, “persons’ entitlements should not be determined by factors such as (...)
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  40.  33
    Sufficiency, Equality and the Consequences of Global Coercion.Kok-Chor Tan - unknown
    In some discussions on global distributive justice, it is argued that the factthat the state exercises coercive authority over its own citizens explains whythe state has egalitarian distributive obligations to its own but not to otherindividuals in the world at large. Two recent works make the case that the globalorder is indeed coercive in a morally significant way for generating certainglobal distributive obligations. Nicole Hassoun argues that the coercivecharacter of the global order gives rise to global duties of humanitarian aid.Laura (...)
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  41.  97
    Why global justice matters.Kok-Chor Tan - 2014 - Journal of Global Ethics 10 (2):128-134.
    Why does global justice as a philosophical inquiry matter? We know that the world is plainly unjust in many ways and we know that something ought to be done about this without, it seems, the need of a theory of global justice. Accordingly, philosophical inquiry into global justice comes across to some as an intellectual luxury that seems disconnected from the real world. I want to suggest, however, that philosophical inquiry into global justice is necessary if we want to address (...)
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  42.  64
    Just conservation: The question of justice in global wildlife conservation.Kok-Chor Tan - 2021 - Philosophy Compass 16 (2):e12720.
    While there is a significant amount of discussion in philosophy on the ethics of wildlife conservation, there is relatively less discussion on the justice of conservation. By the “justice of conservation”, I mean the question of what we owe to fellow human beings with respect to conservation goals and practices. The goal of this paper is two-fold: first to highlight the justice-gap in the morality of wildlife conservation and, second, to frame and propose two dimensions of global conservational justice for (...)
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  43. A Reply to Halliday.Kok-Chor Tan - 2013 - Utilitas 25 (1):133-135.
    ExtractI must first thank Daniel Halliday for his incisive but fair review essay of my book. Regretfully, I can only consider, and only in outline at that, some of his well-taken questions.Send article to KindleTo send this article to your Kindle, first ensure [email protected] is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. (...)
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  44. Two Conceptions of Liberal Global Toleration.Kok-Chor Tan - 2011 - The Monist 94 (4):489-505.
    How should a liberal state respond to a nonliberal state that is however a decent society? By “decent,” I mean, adopting John Rawls’s terminology, that the so described state is nonaggressive and recognizes the independence and equality of other states and that it also honors basic human rights. Should a liberal state tolerate such a nonliberal state? We can identify two possible conceptions of global toleration in this regard. One conception holds that liberal states ought to tolerate nonliberal states; the (...)
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  45. Democracy in a Global World: Human Rights and Political Participation in the 21st Century.David A. Crocker, Carol C. Gould, James Nickel, David Reidy, Martha C. Nussbaum, Andrew Oldenquist, Kok-Chor Tan, William McBride & Frank Cunningham (eds.) - 2007 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    The chapters in this volume deal with timely issues regarding democracy in theory and in practice in today's globalized world. Authored by leading political philosophers of our time, they appear here for the first time. The essays challenge and defend assumptions about the role of democracy as a viable political and legal institution in response to globalization, keeping in focus the role of rights at the normative foundations of democracy in a pluralistic world.
     
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  46.  77
    Andrew Vincent, Nationalism and Particularity (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002), pp. vii + 292.Kok-Chor Tan - 2004 - Utilitas 16 (3):336-338.
  47.  61
    Priority for compatriots: Commentary on globalization and justice.Kok-Chor Tan - 2006 - Economics and Philosophy 22 (1):115-123.
    In his stimulating and provocative collection of essays, Globalization and Justice, Kai Nielsen defends a cosmopolitan account of global justice. On the cosmopolitan view, as Nielsen understands it, individuals are entitled to equal consideration regardless of citizenship or nationality and global institutions should be arranged in such a way that each person's interest is given equal consideration. Nielsen's defense of cosmopolitan justice in this collection will be of no surprise to readers familiar with his socialist egalitarian commitments. Indeed, the internationalism (...)
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  48.  47
    Introduction.Rahul Kumar & Kok-Chor Tan - 2006 - Journal of Social Philosophy 37 (3):323–329.
  49.  26
    A Brief Rejoinder to Valentini.Kok-Chor Tan - unknown
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  50. Cosmopolitanism and Patriotism.Kok-Chor Tan - 2012 - In Will Kymlicka & Kathryn Walker (eds.), Rooted Cosmopolitanism: Canada and the World. University of British Columbia Press.
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