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Kit Rempala
Loyola University, Chicago
  1.  14
    From Knowing to Understanding: Revisiting Consent.Kit Rempala, Marley Hornewer, Joseph Vukov, Rohan Meda & Sarah Khan - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (5):33-35.
    Dickert et al. (2020) effectively address how factors such as time limitations, stress, and illness severity in acute conditions warrant a deeper evaluation of how current consent processes serve patients. While data suggests that patients “prefer to be asked for permission upfront rather than waiving consent” (2), consent forms themselves “are frequently long and technical, follow rigid templates, and contain language that appears to prioritize institutional protection” (1). Such findings elucidate patients’ valuation of personal agency over settling for the “benefit (...)
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  2.  5
    Holding On: A Community Approach to Autonomy in Dementia.Kit Rempala, Marley Hornewer, Joseph Vukov, Rohan Meda & Sarah Khan - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (8):107-109.
    Volume 20, Issue 8, August 2020, Page 107-109.
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  3.  48
    Philosophy Labs.Kit Rempala, Katrina Sifferd & Joseph Vukov - 2021 - Teaching Philosophy 44 (2):187-206.
    Conversation is a foundational aspect of philosophical pedagogy. Too often, however, philosophical research becomes disconnected from this dialogue, and is instead conducted as a solitary endeavor. We aim to bridge the disconnect between philosophical pedagogy and research by proposing a novel framework. Philosophy labs, we propose, can function as both a pedagogical tool and a model for conducting group research. Our review of collaborative learning literature suggests that philosophy labs, like traditional STEM labs, can harness group learning models such as (...)
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  4.  16
    Bioenhanced “Virtues” May Threaten Personal Identity.Gina Lebkuecher, Kit Rempala, Sydney Samoska, Marley Hornewer & Joseph Vukov - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 12 (2-3):117-119.
    Fabiano argues that virtue theory offers the best “safety framework” for mitigating the risks of moral enhancement (1). He advances five desiderata for an ideal safety framework and then explains how virtue theory satisfies each. Among these desiderata is the “preservation of identity” (1). Fabiano argues that moral enhancement can safely preserve personal identity when carried out within the framework of virtue theory. We suggest Fabiano's argument for this conclusion falls short, since contra Fabiano’s claim, enhancing virtues may not preserve—and (...)
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  5.  40
    Please Don't Call Us Jerks. [REVIEW]Marley Hornewer, Sarah Khan, Rohan Meda, Kit Rempala, Sydney Samoska & Joseph Vukov - 2020 - The Philosopher:115.
    A review of Eric Schwitzgebel's book "A Theory of Jerks and Other Philosophical Misadventures" (2020).
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  6.  7
    Harm Reduction Models: Roadmaps for Transformative Experiences.Kit Rempala, Marley Hornewer, Maya Roytman, Sydney Samoska, Rohan Meda & Joseph Vukov - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (7):63-65.
    Patients with severe and enduring anorexia nervosa have a relatively low chance of attaining the symptom-free recovery that traditional eating disorder treatment programs endorse (Bianchi, S...
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  7.  21
    Integrating Neuroethics and Neuroscience: A Framework.Joseph Vukov, Sarah Khan, Sydney Samoska, Marley Hornewer, Rohan Meda & Kit Rempala - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 11 (3):217-218.
    The BRAIN 2.0 Neuroethics Report reflects on the ways in which neuroscientific research may inform our understanding of concepts such as consciousness and empathy, and how advances in this understanding might in turn affect practices such as research on non-human animal primates. Generally, the Report calls for “the integration of neuroscience and neuroethics during the remaining years of the BRAIN initiative and beyond” (NIH 2019). In responding to the Report, the articles in this issue grapple with theoretical questions about what (...)
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  8.  9
    The Dark Side of Morality: Grayer Than You Think?Kit Rempala, Marley Hornewer & Sydney Samoska - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 11 (4):295-297.
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  9.  4
    BCI-Mediated Action, Blame, and Responsibility.Joseph Vukov & Kit Rempala - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics: Neuroscience 11.
    Rainey et al. (forthcoming) discuss the complications that arise with assigning responsibility for brain computer interface (BCI)-mediated actions. Because BCI-mediated actions can differ from non-BCI-mediated actions in terms of control and foreseeability, the authors suggest that our ethical and legal evaluation of these actions may differ in important ways. While we take no issue with the authors’ discussion or conclusion, we also recognize the difficulty of grappling with the relationship between control, foreseeability, and moral responsibility practices, even without the additional (...)
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  10.  4
    From Solo Decision Maker to Multi-Stakeholder Process: A Defense and Recommendations.David Ozar, Joseph Vukov, Kit Rempala & Rohan Meda - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (2):53-55.
    Berger (2019) argues effectively that “representativeness is more aptly understood as a variable that is multidimensional and continuous based on relational moral authority,” and also makes some useful suggestions about how taking this observation seriously might require changes in current patterns of practice regarding surrogates. But the essay raises additional important questions about how the Best Interest Standard (BIS) should be used among unrepresented patients and other patients as well because many surrogates besides those who “have no actionable knowledge of (...)
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  11.  4
    From Epistemic Trespassing to Transdisciplinary Cooperation: The Role of Expertise in the Identification of Usual Care.Joseph Michael Vukov, Kit Rempala, Molly Klug & Marley Hornewer - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (1):52-54.
    According to Macklin & Natanson (2019), one reason unusual practices can be misidentified as usual care is that “instead of using pertinent, accurate information describing usual care, investigators may rely on the opinion of ‘experts’ in the field, whose information may be out of date or otherwise inaccurate." We find Macklin & Natanson’s insights about misattributed expertise crucial, and suggest their discussion can be elucidated further by characterizing it in the context of Ballantyne (2018)’s recent exploration of what he calls (...)
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