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  1.  7
    A Survey of Patient Perspectives on the Research Use of Health Information and Biospecimens.Stacey A. Page, Kiran Pohar Manhas & Daniel A. Muruve - 2016 - BMC Medical Ethics 17 (1):48.
    BackgroundPersonal health information and biospecimens are valuable research resources essential for the advancement of medicine and protected by national standards and provincial statutes. Research ethics and privacy standards attempt to balance individual interests with societal interests. However these standards may not reflect public opinion or preferences. The purpose of this study was to assess the opinions and preferences of patients with kidney disease about the use of their health information and biospecimens for medical research.MethodsA 45-item survey was distributed to a (...)
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  2.  19
    -Trust in Transitioning Ventilator-Dependent Children From Hospital to Homecare.Kiran Pohar Manhas & Ian Mitchell - 2015 - Nursing Ethics 22 (8):913-927.
    Background:Scholarly work is needed to develop the conceptual and theoretical understanding of trust to nursing practice. The transition from hospital care to complex pediatric homecare involves nurses in myriad roles, including management and care provision. Complex pediatric homecare transforms children, families, professionals, and communities, but its exact implications are unclear.Research objectives:To conduct an ethical inquiry into the role and responsibilities of nurses in the qualitative experience of adults involved in the hospital-to-home transition of young, ventilator-dependent children.Research design:We followed methods described (...)
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    The Ethics of Metaphor as a Research Tool.Kiran Pohar Manhas & Kathleen Oberle - 2015 - Research Ethics 11 (1):42-51.
    The interpretive and subjective nature of qualitative research has led to growing utilization of arts-based strategies for data collection, analysis and dissemination. The defining characteristic of all such strategies is that they are largely subjective and intended to invoke personal responses in the ‘audience.’ Following that direction, many qualitative researchers are using metaphor to capture themes emerging from their analysis. In this article, we explore ethical aspects of using metaphor in describing results of qualitative health research and illustrate some of (...)
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