Results for 'Keren Shavit-Cohen'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  8
    The Dynamics of Attention Shifts Among Concurrent Speech in a Naturalistic Multi-speaker Virtual Environment.Keren Shavit-Cohen & Elana Zion Golumbic - 2019 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 13.
  2.  11
    Vaccinating without complete willingness against COVID‐19: Personal and social aspects of Israeli nursing students and faculty members.Linoy Biton, Rachel Shvartsur, Keren Grinberg, Ilya Kagan, Irena Linetsky, Ofra Halperin, Abed N. Azab & Odeya Cohen - forthcoming - Nursing Inquiry:e12601.
    Soon after the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID‐19) pandemic outbreak, it became clear that vaccination will be the most useful tool to combat the disease. Despite the apparent safety and efficacy of the developed anti‐COVID‐19 vaccines, relatively high percentages of the population worldwide refused to get vaccinated, including many health workers and health students. The present cross‐sectional study examined the motives, attitudes, and personal characteristics of those who did not get vaccinated against COVID‐19 or vaccinated without complete willingness among nursing students (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Aesthetic Agency.Keren Gorodeisky - forthcoming - In Luca Ferrero (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Agency. pp. 456-466.
    Until very recently, there has been no discussion of aesthetic agency. This is likely because aesthetics has traditionally focused not on action, but on appreciation, while the standard approach identifies ‘agency’ with the will, and, more specifically, with the capacity for intentional action. In this paper, I argue, first, that this identification is unfortunate since it fails to do justice to the fact that we standardly attribute beliefs, emotions, desires, and other conative and affective attitudes that aren’t formed ‘at will,’ (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  4.  26
    A Micro-ethnographic Study of Big Data-Based Innovation in the Financial Services Sector: Governance, Ethics and Organisational Practices.Keren Naa Abeka Arthur & Richard Owen - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 160 (2):363-375.
    Our study considers the governance, ethics and operational challenges associated with the acquisition, manipulation and commodification of ‘big data’ in the financial services sector. To the best of our knowledge, there are no published studies describing empirical research undertaken within companies in this sector to understand how they are responding to such challenges: our field-based research is a significant initial contribution in this respect. We describe the results of a micro-ethnographic study undertaken in a small-to-medium-sized company developing disruptive, technology-related platforms (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  5. Shifting values partly explain the debate over group selection.Ayelet Shavit - 2004 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 35 (4):697-720.
    I argue that images of the notion of group, in correspondence with their social and political values, shape the debate over the evolution of altruism by group selection. Important aspects of this debate are empirical, and criteria can decide among a variety of selection processes. However, leading researchers undermine or reinterpret such tests, explaining the evolution of altruism on the basis of a single extreme metaphor of ‘group’ and a single inclusive selection process. I shall argue that the extreme images (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  6.  45
    Should Lack of Social Support Prevent Access to Organ Transplantation?Keren Ladin, Norman Daniels & Kelsey N. Berry - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (11):13-24.
    Transplantation programs commonly rely on clinicians’ judgments about patients’ social support (care from friends or family) when deciding whether to list them for organ transplantation. We examine whether using social support to make listing decisions for adults seeking transplantation is morally legitimate, drawing on recent data about the evidence-base, implementation, and potential impacts of the criterion on underserved and diverse populations. We demonstrate that the rationale for the social support criterion, based in the principle of utility, is undermined by its (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  7.  27
    The Myth of the Absent Self: Disinterest, the Self, and Evaluative Self-Consciousness.Keren Gorodeisky - 2023 - In Larissa Berger (ed.), Disinterested Pleasure and Beauty: Perspectives from Kantian and Contemporary Aesthetics. Boston: De Gruyter. pp. 135-166.
    A notorious concept in the history of aesthetics, “disinterest,” has begotten a host of myths. This paper explores and challenges “The Myth of the Absent Self ” [MAS], according to which in disinterested experience, “the subject need not do anything other than dispassionately stare at the object, bringing nothing of herself to the table other than awareness” (Riggle 2016, p. 4). I argue that the criticism of disinterest experience grounded in MAS is skewed by two false assumptions: about the nature (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  19
    Adaptive learning in human–android interactions: an anthropological analysis of play and ritual.Keren Mazuz & Ryuji Yamazaki - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-11.
    Using anthropological theory, this paper examines human–android interactions (HAI) as an emerging aspect of android science. These interactions are described in terms of adaptive learning (which is largely subconscious). This article is based on the observations reported and supplementary data from two studies that took place in Japan with a teleoperated android robot called Telenoid in the socialization of school children and older adults. We argue that interacting with androids brings about a special context, an interval, and a space/time for (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  37
    The Liberative Role of Jhānic Joy and Pleasure in the Early Buddhist Path to Awakening.Keren Arbel - 2016 - Buddhist Studies Review 32 (2):179-206.
    This paper challenges the traditional Buddhist positioning of the four jhànas under the category of `concentration meditation' and the premise regarding their secondary and superfluous role in the path of liberation. It seeks to show that the common interpretation of the jhànas as absorption-concentration, attainments that have no liberative value, is incompatible with the teachings of the Pàli Nikàyas. The paper argues few things: First, that one attains the jhànas, not by fixating the mind or being absorbed into a meditation (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  26
    Reduced Orbitofrontal Gray Matter Concentration as a Marker of Premorbid Childhood Trauma in Cocaine Use Disorder.Keren Bachi, Muhammad A. Parvaz, Scott J. Moeller, Gabriela Gan, Anna Zilverstand, Rita Z. Goldstein & Nelly Alia-Klein - 2018 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 12.
  11. Le devenir-juif du poème.Danielle Cohen-Levinas - 2015 - Les Presses de l’Université de Montréal.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  69
    Equine-facilitated psychotherapy: The gap between practice and knowledge.Keren Bachi - 2012 - Society and Animals 20 (4):364-380.
    Equine-Facilitated Psychotherapy is widely used, and the uses to which it can be put are still being developed. However, existing knowledge about this field is insufficient, and most of the research suffers from methodological problems that compromise its rigor. This review will explore research into the linked fields of Animal-Assisted Therapy and Equine-Assisted Activities/Therapies related to physical health. Existing knowledge of mental, emotional, and social applications of EAA/T is presented. Evaluation studies in the subfield suggest that people benefit from interventions (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  13.  33
    How important is social support in determining patients’ suitability for transplantation? Results from a National Survey of Transplant Clinicians.Keren Ladin, Joanna Emerson, Zeeshan Butt, Elisa J. Gordon, Douglas W. Hanto, Jennifer Perloff, Norman Daniels & Tara A. Lavelle - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (10):666-674.
    BackgroundNational guidelines require programmes use subjective assessments of social support when determining transplant suitability, despite limited evidence linking it to outcomes. We examined how transplant providers weigh the importance of social support for kidney transplantation compared with other factors, and variation by clinical role and personal beliefs.MethodsThe National survey of the American Society of Transplant Surgeons and the Society of Transplant Social Work in 2016. Using a discrete choice approach, respondents compared two hypothetical patient profiles and selected one for transplantation. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  14. Kant on the Ethics of Belief.Alix Cohen - 2014 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 114 (3pt3):317-334.
    In this paper, I explore the possibility of developing a Kantian account of the ethics of belief by deploying the tools provided by Kant's ethics. To do so, I reconstruct epistemic concepts and arguments on the model of their ethical counterparts, focusing on the notions of epistemic principle, epistemic maxim and epistemic universalizability test. On this basis, I suggest that there is an analogy between our position as moral agents and as cognizers: our actions and our thoughts are subject to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  15. Aesthetic Rationality.Keren Gorodeisky & Eric Marcus - 2018 - Journal of Philosophy 115 (3):113-140.
    We argue that the aesthetic domain falls inside the scope of rationality, but does so in its own way. Aesthetic judgment is a stance neither on whether a proposition is to be believed nor on whether an action is to be done, but on whether an object is to be appreciated. Aesthetic judgment is simply appreciation. Correlatively, reasons supporting theoretical, practical and aesthetic judgments operate in fundamentally different ways. The irreducibility of the aesthetic domain is due to the fact that (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   48 citations  
  16. The authority of pleasure.Keren Gorodeisky - 2021 - Noûs 55 (1):199-220.
    The aim of the paper is to reassess the prospects of a widely neglected affective conception of the aesthetic evaluation and appreciation of art. On the proposed picture, the aesthetic evaluation and appreciation of art are non-contingently constituted by a particular kind of pleasure. Artworks that are valuable qua artworks merit, deserve, and call for a certain pleasure, the same pleasure that reveals (or at least purports to reveal) them to be valuable in the way that they are, and constitutes (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  17. On Liking Aesthetic Value.Keren Gorodeisky - 2019 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 102 (2):261-280.
    According to tradition, aesthetic value is non-contingently connected to a certain feeling of liking or pleasure. Is that true? Two answers are on offer in the field of aesthetics today: 1. The Hedonist answers: Yes, aesthetic value is non-contingently connected to pleasure insofar as this value is constituted and explained by the power of its possessors to please (under standard conditions). 2. The Non-Affectivist answers: No. At best, pleasure is contingently related to aesthetic value. The aim of this paper is (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   36 citations  
  18.  30
    The Notion of 'Group' and Tests of Group Selection.Ayelet Shavit - 2005 - Philosophy of Science 72 (5):1052-1063.
    This paper examines the empirical aspect of the debates over group selection. I argue that specific narrow readings of the notion of ‘group’ result in a deficient experimentation of the group selection process. Criteria for empirical testability are presented and used to reexamine two well-known experiments of group selection. I argue that the former holds a narrow image of ‘group’ that does not distinguish group selection from selection at other levels; while the latter holds a multifaceted image of ‘group’ that (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  19. The Public Understanding of What? Laypersons' Epistemic Needs, the Division of Cognitive Labor, and the Demarcation of Science.Arnon Keren - 2018 - Philosophy of Science 85 (5):781-792.
    What must laypersons understand about science to allow them to make sound decisions on science-related issues? Relying on recent developments in social epistemology, this paper argues that scientific education should have the goal not of bringing laypersons' understanding of science closer to that of expert insiders, but rather of cultivating the kind of competence characteristic of “competent outsiders” (Feinstein 2011). Moreover, it argues that philosophers of science have an important role to play in attempts to promote this kind of understanding, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  20.  82
    Mindblindness: An Essay on Autism and Theory of Mind.Simon Baron-Cohen - 1997 - MIT Press.
    In Mindblindness, Simon Baron-Cohen presents a model of the evolution and development of "mindreading." He argues that we mindread all the time, effortlessly, automatically, and mostly unconsciously. It is the natural way in which we interpret, predict, and participate in social behavior and communication. We ascribe mental states to people: states such as thoughts, desires, knowledge, and intentions. Building on many years of research, Baron-Cohen concludes that children with autism, suffer from "mindblindness" as a result of a selective (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   468 citations  
  21.  22
    A multimodal approach for the ecological investigation of sustained attention: A pilot study.Keren Avirame, Noga Gshur, Reut Komemi & Lena Lipskaya-Velikovsky - 2022 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 16:971314.
    Natural fluctuations in sustained attention can lead to attentional failures in everyday tasks and even dangerous incidences. These fluctuations depend on personal factors, as well as task characteristics. So far, our understanding of sustained attention is partly due to the common usage of laboratory setups and tasks, and the complex interplay between behavior and brain activity. The focus of the current study was thus to test the feasibility of applying a single-channel wireless EEG to monitor patterns of sustained attention during (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. The systemizing quotient: an investigation of adults with Asperger syndrome or high-functioning autism and normal sex differences.Baron-Cohen, Richler, Bisarya & Gurunathan & Wheelwright - 2004 - In Uta Frith & Elisabeth Hill (eds.), Autism: Mind and Brain. Oxford University Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   100 citations  
  23. The function of structure preservation: Derived environments.Keren Rice - 1987 - In Joyce McDunough & Bernadette Plunkett (eds.), Proceedings of the North East Linguistic Society. pp. 17--501.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24.  22
    Courts and Diversity: Normative Justifications and Their Empirical Implications.Keren Weinshall - 2021 - The Law and Ethics of Human Rights 15 (2):187-220.
    The study distinguishes between three normative approaches that view diversity in the judiciary as a desirable ideal, outlines their expected empirical implications for judicial decision-making, and tests the implications against data from the Israeli Supreme Court. The “reflecting” approach suggests that diversifying the courts is important mainly as a means of strengthening the public’s confidence in them and does not impact judicial decisions. The “representing” approach asserts that judges serve as representatives of their social sectors. Thus, they tend to rule (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. Zagzebski on Authority and Preemption in the Domain of Belief.Arnon Keren - 2014 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 6 (4):61-76.
    The paper discusses Linda Zagzebski's account of epistemic authority. Building on Joseph Raz's account of political authority, Zagzebski argues that the basic contours of epistemic authority match those Raz ascribes to political authority. This, it is argued, is a mistake. Zagzebski is correct in identifying the pre-emptive nature of reasons provided by an authority as central to our understanding of epistemic authority. However, Zagzebski ignores important differences between practical and epistemic authority. As a result, her attempt to explain the rationality (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  26.  90
    Aristotle on Non-substantial Particulars, Fundamentality, and Change.Keren Wilson Shatalov - forthcoming - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie.
    There is a debate about whether particular properties are for Aristotle non-recurrent and trope-like individuals or recurrent universals. I argue that Physics I.7 provides evidence that he took non-substantial particulars to be neither; they are instead non-recurrent modes. Physics I.7 also helps show why this matters. Particular properties must be individual modes in order for Aristotle to preserve three key philosophical commitments: that objects of ordinary experience are primary substances, that primary substances undergo genuine change, and that primary substances are (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. Aesthetic knowledge.Keren Gorodeisky & Eric Marcus - 2022 - Philosophical Studies 179 (8):2507-2535.
    What is the source of aesthetic knowledge? Empirical knowledge, it is generally held, bottoms out in perception. Such knowledge can be transmitted to others through testimony, preserved by memory, and amplified via inference. But perception is where the rubber hits the road. What about aesthetic knowledge? Does it too bottom out in perception? Most say “yes”. But this is wrong. When it comes to aesthetic knowledge, it is appreciation, not perception, where the rubber hits the road. The ultimate source of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  28.  38
    Trust, Preemption, and Knowledge.Arnon Keren - 2019 - In Katherine Dormandy (ed.), Trust in Epistemology.
    This chapter gives an account of epistemic trust. It argues that trust in general is a matter of declining to take precautions against the trustee’s failing to come through, and that this amounts in the epistemic case to declining to rely on evidence for the testified proposition, instead relying solely on the testifier. But if this is so, how can trust play a positive role in securing knowledge? The key, it is argued, lies in recognizing that trust is preemptive: Trusting (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  29. Philosophy, politics, democracy: selected essays.Joshua Cohen - 2009 - Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press.
    Deliberation and democratic legitimacy -- Moral pluralism and political consensus -- Associations and democracy (with Joel Rogers) -- Freedom of expression -- Procedure and substance in deliberative democracy -- Directly-deliberative polyarchy (with Charles Sabel) -- Democracy and liberty -- Money, politics, political equality -- Privacy, pluralism, and democracy -- Reflections on deliberative democracy -- Truth and public reason.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  30.  37
    Attention and interpretation processes and trait anger experience, expression, and control.Keren Maoz, Amy B. Adler, Paul D. Bliese, Maurice L. Sipos, Phillip J. Quartana & Yair Bar-Haim - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (7):1453-1464.
    This study explored attention and interpretation biases in processing facial expressions as correlates of theoretically distinct self-reported anger experience, expression, and control. Non-selected undergraduate students completed cognitive tasks measuring attention bias, interpretation bias, and Spielberger’s State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory. Attention bias toward angry faces was associated with higher trait anger and anger expression and with lower anger control-in and anger control-out. The propensity to quickly interpret ambiguous faces as angry was associated with greater anger expression and its subcomponent of anger (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31.  99
    “MySpace” or Yours? The Ethical Dilemma of Graduate Students' Personal Lives on the Internet.Keren Lehavot - 2009 - Ethics and Behavior 19 (2):129 – 141.
    The booming popularity of the Internet, and particularly increasing use of personal Web sites, social networking sites, and blogging, raises questions regarding the ethical use of psychology graduate students' personal online information for academic purposes. Given rising controversies such as use of such information to screen applicants, I refer to the principles and standards of the Ethics Code of the American Psychological Association (2002) to examine ethical concerns associated with graduate students' personal information on the Internet, namely, the protection of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  32.  38
    Continuity and Mathematical Ontology in Aristotle.Keren Wilson Shatalov - 2020 - Journal of Ancient Philosophy 14 (1):30-61.
    In this paper I argue that Aristotle's understanding of mathematical continuity constrains the mathematical ontology he can consistently hold. On my reading, Aristotle can only be a mathematical abstractionist of a certain sort. To show this, I first present an analysis of Aristotle's notion of continuity by bringing together texts from his Metaphysica and Physica, to show that continuity is, for Aristotle, a certain kind of per se unity, and that upon this rests his distinction between continuity and contiguity. Next (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  33. Hypokeimenon vs. Substance.Keren Shatalov - 2020 - Review of Metaphysics 74 (294):227-250.
    Aristotle’s concept of subject, or hypokeimenon, has been understudied in scholarship, in part because, since Aristotle associates it with his concept of ousia or substance, discussion of hypokeimenon is often eclipsed by that of substance. It is often thought that Aristotle introduces hypokeimenon as the criterion for being a substance in his Categories. In this essay I argue that he does not, thus calling into question some entrenched views about Aristotelian substance. Divorcing hypokeimenon from substance in this way emphasizes the (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  34. Delibration and democratic legitimacy.Joshua Cohen - 1989 - In Derek Matravers & Jonathan Pike (eds.), Debates in Contemporary Political Philosophy: An Anthology. Routledge, in Association with the Open University.
  35.  49
    ‘Illocutions and Perlocutions.Ted Cohen - 1973 - Foundations of Language 9 (4):492-503.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  36. Do illocutionary forces exist?L. Jonathan Cohen - 1964 - Philosophical Quarterly 14 (55):118-137.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  37. A new look at Kant's view of aesthetic testimony.Keren Gorodeisky - 2010 - British Journal of Aesthetics 50 (1):53-70.
    In this paper I explore the following threefold question: first, is there a genuine problem of grounding aesthetic judgement in testimony? Second, if there is such a problem, what exactly is its nature? And lastly, can Kant help us get clearer on the problem? Following Kant, I argue that the problem with aesthetic testimony is explained by norms that govern what it takes to judge a beautiful object aesthetically, rather than theoretically or practically, not by norms that govern what it (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   38 citations  
  38. Must Reasons be Either Theoretical or Practical? Aesthetic Criticism and Appreciative Reasons.Keren Gorodeisky - 2021 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 100 (2):313-329.
    A long debate in aesthetics concerns the reasoned nature of criticism. The main questions in the debate are whether criticism is based on (normative) reasons, whether critics communicate reasons for their audience’s responses, and if so, how to understand these critical reasons. I argue that a great obstacle to making any progress in this debate is the deeply engrained assumption, shared by all sides of the debate, that reasons can only be either theoretical reasons (i.e., those that explain what to (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  39. There and back again, or the problem of locality in biodiversity surveys.Ayelet Shavit & James Griesemer - 2009 - Philosophy of Science 76 (3):273-294.
    We argue that ‘locality’, perhaps the most mundane term in ecology, holds a basic ambiguity: two concepts of space—nomothetic and idiographic—which are both necessary for a rigorous resurvey to “the same” locality in the field, are committed to different practices with no common measurement. A case study unfolds the failure of the standard assumption that an exogenous grid of longitude and latitude, as fine‐grained as one wishes, suffices for revisiting a species locality. We briefly suggest a scale‐dependent “resolution” for this (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  40. Trust and belief: a preemptive reasons account.Arnon Keren - 2014 - Synthese 191 (12):2593-2615.
    According to doxastic accounts of trust, trusting a person to \(\varPhi \) involves, among other things, holding a belief about the trusted person: either the belief that the trusted person is trustworthy or the belief that she actually will \(\varPhi \) . In recent years, several philosophers have argued against doxastic accounts of trust. They have claimed that the phenomenology of trust suggests that rather than such a belief, trust involves some kind of non-doxastic mental attitude towards the trusted person, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   46 citations  
  41.  12
    The use of AI in legal systems: determining independent contractor vs. employee status.Maxime C. Cohen, Samuel Dahan, Warut Khern-Am-Nuai, Hajime Shimao & Jonathan Touboul - forthcoming - Artificial Intelligence and Law:1-30.
    The use of artificial intelligence (AI) to aid legal decision making has become prominent. This paper investigates the use of AI in a critical issue in employment law, the determination of a worker’s status—employee vs. independent contractor—in two common law countries (the U.S. and Canada). This legal question has been a contentious labor issue insofar as independent contractors are not eligible for the same benefits as employees. It has become an important societal issue due to the ubiquity of the gig (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  42.  21
    Hypokeimenon versus Substance.Keren Wilson Shatalov - 2020 - Review of Metaphysics 74 (2):227-250.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  43. Does the autistic child have a “theory of mind”?Simon Baron-Cohen, Alan M. Leslie & Uta Frith - 1985 - Cognition 21 (1):37-46.
    We use a new model of metarepresentational development to predict a cognitive deficit which could explain a crucial component of the social impairment in childhood autism. One of the manifestations of a basic metarepresentational capacity is a ‘ theory of mind ’. We have reason to believe that autistic children lack such a ‘ theory ’. If this were so, then they would be unable to impute beliefs to others and to predict their behaviour. This hypothesis was tested using Wimmer (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   646 citations  
  44. Mindblindness. An essay on autism and theory of mind, Cambridge, Mass, MITPTCSS, tradiit. Dautismo e la lettura della mente, Roma.S. Baron-Cohen - forthcoming - Astrolabio.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   156 citations  
  45.  32
    Understanding Other Minds: Perspectives From Autism.Simon Baron-Cohen, Helen Tager-Flusberg & Donald J. Cohen - 1993 - Oxford University Press.
    An examination of the controversial "theory of mind" hypothesis, which states that children with autism are unable to comprehend other people's mental states. The theory relates to the most fundamental questions of normal development as well as to autism i.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   104 citations  
  46.  39
    Making Sense of Infant Familiarity and Novelty Responses to Words at Lexical Onset.Rory A. DePaolis, Tamar Keren-Portnoy & Marilyn Vihman - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  47. Disagreement, progress, and the goal of philosophy.Arnon Keren - 2023 - Synthese 201 (2):1-22.
    Modest pessimism about philosophical progress is the view that while philosophy may sometimes make some progress, philosophy has made, and can be expected to make, only very little progress (where the extent of philosophical progress is typically judged against progress in the hard sciences). The paper argues against recent attempts to defend this view on the basis of the pervasiveness of disagreement within philosophy. The argument from disagreement for modest pessimism assumes a teleological conception of progress, according to which the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  48.  7
    Evolution of social attentional cues: Evidence from the archerfish.Keren Leadner, Liora Sekely, Raymond M. Klein & Shai Gabay - 2021 - Cognition 207 (C):104511.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49.  59
    The Psychology of Social Networking: the Challenges of Social Networking for Fame-Valuing Teens’ Body Image.Keren Eyal & Tali Te’eni-Harari - 2017 - Philosophia 45 (3):947-956.
    The article argues that youth’s exposure to thin-idealizing content posted by their adored celebrities on interactive and highly engaging social networking sites poses potential challenges for these young people. Celebrity SNS presence responds to youth’s desire for social connectedness, public approval, and fame, which are highlighted at the time of their identity search and establishment. SNS content likely interacts with teens’ unique developmental characteristics, personal background, and interests to propel processes such as identification and social comparison with famous personae leading (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50.  19
    The Inclusive Behavioral Immune System.Keren Shakhar - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
1 — 50 / 1000