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  1.  77
    Risk Management Principles for Nanotechnology.Gary E. Marchant, Douglas J. Sylvester & Kenneth W. Abbott - 2008 - NanoEthics 2 (1):43-60.
    Risk management of nanotechnology is challenged by the enormous uncertainties about the risks, benefits, properties, and future direction of nanotechnology applications. Because of these uncertainties, traditional risk management principles such as acceptable risk, cost–benefit analysis, and feasibility are unworkable, as is the newest risk management principle, the precautionary principle. Yet, simply waiting for these uncertainties to be resolved before undertaking risk management efforts would not be prudent, in part because of the growing public concerns about nanotechnology driven by risk perception (...)
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    What Does the History of Technology Regulation Teach Us About Nano Oversight?Gary E. Marchant, Douglas J. Sylvester & Kenneth W. Abbott - 2009 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 37 (4):724-731.
    As policy makers struggle to develop regulatory oversight models for nanotechnologies, there are important lessons that can be drawn from previous attempts to govern other emerging technologies. Five such lessons are the following: public confidence and trust in a technology and its regulatory oversight is probably the most important factor for the commercial success of a technology; regulation should avoid discriminating against particular technologies unless there is a scientifically based rationale for the disparate treatment; regulatory systems need to be flexible (...)
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    What Does the History of Technology Regulation Teach Us About Nano Oversight?Gary E. Marchant, Douglas J. Sylvester & Kenneth W. Abbott - 2009 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 37 (4):724-731.
    Nanotechnology is the latest in a growing list of emerging technologies that includes nuclear technologies, genetics, reproductive biology, biotechnology, information technology, robotics, communication technologies, surveillance technologies, synthetic biology, and neuroscience. As was the case for many of the technologies that came before, a key question facing nanotechnology is what type of regulatory oversight is appropriate for this emerging technology. As two of us wrote several years ago, the question facing nanotechnology is not whether it will be regulated, but when and (...)
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