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  1. Cow Care in Hindu Animal Ethics.Kenneth R. Valpey - 2019 - Springer Verlag.
    This Open Access book provides both a broad perspective and a focused examination of cow care as a subject of widespread ethical concern in India, and increasingly in other parts of the world. In the face of what has persisted as a highly charged political issue over cow protection in India, intellectual space must be made to bring the wealth of Indian traditional ethical discourse to bear on the realities of current human-animal relationships, particularly those of humans with cows. Dharma, (...)
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    The Bhagavata Purana: Sacred Text and Living Tradition.Ravi M. Gupta & Kenneth R. Valpey (eds.) - 2013 - Columbia University Press.
    A vibrant example of living literature, the Bhagavata Purana is a versatile Hindu sacred text written in Sanskrit verse. Finding its present form by the tenth century C.E., the work inspired several major north Indian devotional (bhakti) traditions as well as schools of dance and drama, and continues to permeate popular Hindu art and ritual in both India and the diaspora. Introducing the Bhagavata Purana's key themes while also examining its extensive influence on Hindu thought and practice, this collection conducts (...)
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    Introduction toJoural of Dharma Studiesissue on Ecology and Dharma.Kenneth R. Valpey & Christopher Fici - 2021 - Journal of Dharma Studies 4 (1):1-4.
    Here we introduce the theme of this issue of the Journal of Dharma Studies, namely, Dharma and Ecology, and give brief introductions to each article in the issue.
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    Igniting Hanuman's Tail: Hindu and Indian Secular Views on Animal Experimentation.Kenneth R. Valpey - 2016 - Journal of Animal Ethics 6 (2):213.
    Contemporary Indian identification with Hindu traditions (whether more narrowly or broadly conceived) among champions of animal protection often invokes the well-known concept of ahiṁṣā—nonviolence, as the moral basis for the position against violence toward non-human animals. To foster a more informed comprehension of this notion, this paper sets out the complex character of religious practice as presented in the Hindu scripture Bhagavad-gītā, to explore how its tenets might meaningfully apply to the practice of animal experimentation.
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