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  1.  54
    Infant Crying in Context.Rami Nader, Elizabeth A. Job, Melanie Badali & Kenneth D. Craig - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (4):469-470.
    Our focus has been on the role of early cry as a commanding source of information about infant pain and distress that requires interpretation by an adult caregiver. Its inherent ambiguity may offer an adaptive advantage, as resolution requires adult presence and scrutiny of other behavioral, physical, and contextual factors.
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  2.  7
    Pain: Psychological Perspectives.Thomas Hadjistavropoulos & Kenneth D. Craig (eds.) - 2004 - Psychology Press.
    This invaluable resource presents a state-of-the-art account of the psychology of pain from leading researchers. It features contributions from clinical, social, and biopsychological perspectives, the latest theories of pain, as well as basic processes and applied issues. The book opens with an introduction to the history of pain theory and the epidemiology of pain. It then explores theoretical work, including the gate control theory/neuromatrix model, as well as biopsychosocial, cognitive/behavioral, and psychodynamic perspectives. Issues, such as the link between psychophysiological processes (...)
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  3.  19
    Youth and Parent Appraisals of Participation in a Study of Spontaneous and Induced Pediatric Clinical Pain.Kara Hawley, Jeannie S. Huang, Matthew Goodwin, Damaris Diaz, Virginia R. de Sa, Kathryn A. Birnie, Christine T. Chambers & Kenneth D. Craig - 2019 - Ethics and Behavior 29 (4):259-273.
    The current study examined youths’ and their parents’ perceptions concerning participation in an investigation of spontaneous and induced pain during recovery from laparoscopic appendectomy. Youth and their parents independently completed surveys about their study participation. On a scale from 0 to 10, both parents and youth rated their experience as positive. Among youth, experience ratings did not differ by pain severity and survey responses did not differ by age. Most youth reported that they would tell another youth to participate. Ethical (...)
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  4.  21
    Pain in the Social Animal.Kenneth D. Craig & Melanie A. Badali - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (4):456-457.
    Human pain experience and expression evolved to serve a range of social functions, including warning others, eliciting care, and influencing interpersonal relationships, as well as to protect from physical danger. Study of the relatively specific, involuntary, and salient facial display of pain permits examination of these roles, extending our appreciation of pain beyond the prevalent narrow focus on somatosensory mechanisms.
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  5. Social Influences and the Communication of Pain.Thomas Hadjistavropoulos, Kenneth D. Craig & Shannon Fuchs-Lacelle - 2004 - In Thomas Hadjistavropoulos & Kenneth D. Craig (eds.), Pain: Psychological Perspectives. pp. 87--112.
     
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