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Ken McRae [17]Kenneth D. McRae [2]
  1.  18
    Prediction‐Based Learning and Processing of Event Knowledge.Ken McRae, Kevin S. Brown & Jeffrey L. Elman - 2021 - Topics in Cognitive Science 13 (1):206-223.
    McRae, Brown and Elman argue against the view that events are structured as frequently‐occurring sequences of world stimuli. They underline the importance of temporal structure defining event types and advance a more complex temporal structure, which allows for some variance in the component elements.
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  2.  52
    On the nature and scope of featural representations of word meaning.Ken McRae, Virginia R. de Sa & Mark S. Seidenberg - 1997 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 126 (2):99-130.
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  3.  48
    Spatial representations activated during real‐time comprehension of verbs.Daniel C. Richardson, Michael J. Spivey, Lawrence W. Barsalou & Ken McRae - 2003 - Cognitive Science 27 (5):767-780.
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  4.  33
    Activating event knowledge.Mary Hare, Michael Jones, Caroline Thomson, Sarah Kelly & Ken McRae - 2009 - Cognition 111 (2):151-167.
  5.  20
    An Attractor Model of Lexical Conceptual Processing: Simulating Semantic Priming.George S. Cree, Ken McRae & Chris McNorgan - 1999 - Cognitive Science 23 (3):371-414.
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  6.  20
    A model of event knowledge.Jeffrey L. Elman & Ken McRae - 2019 - Psychological Review 126 (2):252-291.
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  7.  29
    Abstract Concepts and Pictures of Real‐World Situations Activate One Another.Ken McRae, Daniel Nedjadrasul, Raymond Pau, Bethany Pui-Hei Lo & Lisa King - 2018 - Topics in Cognitive Science 10 (3):518-532.
    concepts typically are defined in terms of lacking physical or perceptual referents. We argue instead that they are not devoid of perceptual information because knowledge of real-world situations is an important component of learning and using many abstract concepts. Although the relationship between perceptual information and abstract concepts is less straightforward than for concrete concepts, situation-based perceptual knowledge is part of many abstract concepts. In Experiment 1, participants made lexical decisions to abstract words that were preceded by related and unrelated (...)
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  8.  26
    Simulating the N400 ERP component as semantic network error: Insights from a feature-based connectionist attractor model of word meaning.Milena Rabovsky & Ken McRae - 2014 - Cognition 132 (1):68-89.
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  9.  23
    Analyzing the factors underlying the structure and computation of the meaning of< em> chipmunk,< em> cherry,< em> chisel,< em> cheese, and< em> cello(and many other such concrete nouns).George S. Cree & Ken McRae - 2003 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 132 (2):163.
  10.  28
    Conceptual Hierarchies in a Flat Attractor Network: Dynamics of Learning and Computations.Christopher M. O’Connor, George S. Cree & Ken McRae - 2009 - Cognitive Science 33 (4):665-708.
    The structure of people’s conceptual knowledge of concrete nouns has traditionally been viewed as hierarchical (Collins & Quillian, 1969). For example, superordinate concepts (vegetable) are assumed to reside at a higher level than basic‐level concepts (carrot). A feature‐based attractor network with a single layer of semantic features developed representations of both basic‐level and superordinate concepts. No hierarchical structure was built into the network. In Experiment and Simulation 1, the graded structure of categories (typicality ratings) is accounted for by the flat (...)
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  11.  33
    The Wind Chilled the Spectators, but the Wine Just Chilled: Sense, Structure, and Sentence Comprehension.Mary Hare, Jeffrey L. Elman, Tracy Tabaczynski & Ken McRae - 2009 - Cognitive Science 33 (4):610-628.
    Anticipation plays a role in language comprehension. In this article, we explore the extent to which verb sense influences expectations about upcoming structure. We focus on change of state verbs like shatter, which have different senses that are expressed in either transitive or intransitive structures, depending on the sense that is used. In two experiments we influence the interpretation of verb sense by manipulating the thematic fit of the grammatical subject as cause or affected entity for the verb, and test (...)
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  12.  26
    Online expectations for verbal arguments conditional on event knowledge.Klinton Bicknell, Jeffrey L. Elman, Mary Hare, Ken McRae & Marta Kutas - 2008 - In B. C. Love, K. McRae & V. M. Sloutsky (eds.), Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society.
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  13.  11
    Integrating conceptual knowledge within and across representational modalities.Chris McNorgan, Jackie Reid & Ken McRae - 2011 - Cognition 118 (2):211-233.
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  14.  4
    Investigating the Extent to which Distributional Semantic Models Capture a Broad Range of Semantic Relations.Kevin S. Brown, Eiling Yee, Gitte Joergensen, Melissa Troyer, Elliot Saltzman, Jay Rueckl, James S. Magnuson & Ken McRae - 2023 - Cognitive Science 47 (5):e13291.
    Distributional semantic models (DSMs) are a primary method for distilling semantic information from corpora. However, a key question remains: What types of semantic relations among words do DSMs detect? Prior work typically has addressed this question using limited human data that are restricted to semantic similarity and/or general semantic relatedness. We tested eight DSMs that are popular in current cognitive and psycholinguistic research (positive pointwise mutual information; global vectors; and three variations each of Skip-gram and continuous bag of words (CBOW) (...)
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  15.  18
    A Postscript on Bodin's Connections with Ramism.Kenneth D. McRae - 1963 - Journal of the History of Ideas 24 (4):569.
  16.  15
    Beyond the sensory/functional dichotomy.George S. Cree & Ken McRae - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (3):480-481.
    Most current theories of category-specific semantic deficits appeal to the role of sensory and functional knowledge types in explaining patients' impairments. We discuss why this binary classification is inadequate, point to a more detailed knowledge type taxonomy, and suggest how it may provide insight into the relationships between category-specific semantic deficits and impairments of specific aspects of knowledge.
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  17.  6
    Postscript: Rejoinder to McKoon and Ratcliff (2005).Ken McRae, Mary Hare & Michael K. Tanenhaus - 2005 - Psychological Review 112 (4):1031-1031.
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  18.  5
    Ramist Tendencies in the Thought of Jean Bodin.Kenneth D. McRae - 1955 - Journal of the History of Ideas 16 (1/4):306.
  19.  6
    Meaning through syntax is insufficient to explain comprehension of sentences with reduced relative clauses: Comment on McKoon and Ratcliff (2003).Ken McRae, Mary Hare & Michael K. Tanenhaus - 2005 - Psychological Review 112 (4):1022-1031.