24 found
Order:
Disambiguations
Keisha Ray [13]Keisha Shantel Ray [7]Keisha S. Ray [4]
  1.  39
    The Bioethics of Environmental Injustice: Ethical, Legal, and Clinical Implications of Unhealthy Environments.Keisha Ray & Jane Fallis Cooper - 2023 - American Journal of Bioethics 24 (3):9-17.
    Environmental health remains a niche topic in bioethics, despite being a prominent social determinant of health. In this paper we argue that if bioethicists are to take the project of health justice as a serious one, then we have to address environmental injustices and the threats they pose to our bioethics principles, health equity, and clinical care. To do this, we lay out three arguments supporting prioritizing environmental health in bioethics based on bioethics principles including a commitment to vulnerable populations (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  2.  32
    Bioethics Must Exemplify a Clear Path toward Justice: A Call to Action.Keisha Ray, Folasade C. Lapite, Shameka Poetry Thomas & Faith Fletcher - 2022 - American Journal of Bioethics 22 (1):14-16.
    Fabi and Goldberg raised important considerations regarding both research and funding priorities in the field of bioethics and, in particular, the field’s misalignment with social justice. W...
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  3.  42
    Addressing Anti‐Black Racism in Bioethics: Responding to the Call.Faith E. Fletcher, Keisha S. Ray, Virginia A. Brown & Patrick T. Smith - 2022 - Hastings Center Report 52 (S1):3-11.
    Hastings Center Report, Volume 52, Issue S1, Page S3-S11, March‐April 2022.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  4.  50
    It’s Time for a Black Bioethics.Keisha Shantel Ray - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (2):38-40.
    There are some long-standing social issues that imperil Black Americans’ relationship with health and healthcare. These issues include racial disparities in health outcomes, provider bi...
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  5.  59
    Not Just “Study Drugs” for the Rich: Stimulants as Moral Tools for Creating Opportunities for Socially Disadvantaged Students.Keisha Shantel Ray - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (6):29-38.
    An argument in the cognitive enhancement literature is that using stimulants in populations of healthy but socially disadvantaged individuals mistakenly attributes pathology to nonpathological individuals who experience social inequalities. As the argument goes, using stimulants as cognitive-enhancing drugs to solve the social problem of poorly educated students in inadequate schools misattributes the problem as an individual medical problem, when it is really a collective sociopolitical problem. I challenge this argument on the grounds that not all types of enhancement have to (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  6.  37
    The Hopkins-Oxford Psychedelics Ethics (HOPE) Working Group Consensus Statement.Edward Jacobs, Brian D. Earp, Paul S. Appelbaum, Lori Bruce, Ksenia Cassidy, Yuria Celidwen, Katherine Cheung, Sean K. Clancy, Neşe Devenot, Jules Evans, Holly Fernandez Lynch, Phoebe Friesen, Albert Garcia Romeu, Neil Gehani, Molly Maloof, Olivia Marcus, Ole Martin Moen, Mayli Mertens, Sandeep M. Nayak, Tehseen Noorani, Kyle Patch, Sebastian Porsdam-Mann, Gokul Raj, Khaleel Rajwani, Keisha Ray, William Smith, Daniel Villiger, Neil Levy, Roger Crisp, Julian Savulescu, Ilina Singh & David B. Yaden - 2024 - American Journal of Bioethics 24 (7):6-12.
    Volume 24, Issue 7, July 2024, Page 6-12.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  26
    Black Bioethics in the Age of Black Lives Matter.Keisha Ray, Faith E. Fletcher, Daphne O. Martschenko & Jennifer E. James - 2023 - Journal of Medical Humanities 44 (2):251-267.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  8.  39
    Racism in healthcare and bioethics.Agomoni Ganguli-Mitra, Arianne Shahvisi, Angela Ballantyne & Keisha Ray - 2022 - Bioethics 36 (3):233-234.
    Bioethics, Volume 36, Issue 3, Page 233-234, March 2022.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  9.  26
    In the Name of Racial Justice: Why Bioethics Should Care about Environmental Toxins.Keisha Ray - 2021 - Hastings Center Report 51 (3):23-26.
    Facilities that emit hazardous toxins, such as toxic landfills, oil refineries, and chemical plants, are disproportionately located in predominantly Black, Latinx, and Indigenous neighborhoods. Environmental injustices like these threaten just distribution of health itself, including access to health that is not dependent on having the right skin color, living in the right neighborhood, or making the right amount of money. Facilities that emit environmental toxins wrongly make people's race, ethnicity, income, and neighborhood essential to who is allowed to breathe clean (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  10.  29
    Going Beyond the Data: Using Testimonies to Humanize Pedagogy on Black Health.Keisha S. Ray - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (4):725-735.
    When health professions learners’ primary pedagogical experience of Black people and how they become patients is through statistics, it becomes very easy for learners to think of Black people as data points rather than as individuals whose health is often at the mercy of racist institutions. When the human dimension of Black people’s health is ignored, specifically the ways that poor health affects individual wellbeing, one of the barriers to proper health for Black patients is how to be seen and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  11.  78
    Moral Bioenhancement, Social Biases, and the Regulation of Empathy.Keisha Ray & Lori Gallegos de Castillo - 2019 - Topoi 38 (1):125-133.
    Some proponents of moral bioenhancement propose that people should utilize biomedical practices to enhance the faculties and traits that are associated with moral agency, such as empathy and a sense of justice. The hope is that doing so will improve our ability to meet the moral challenges that have emerged in our contemporary, globalized world. In this paper, we caution against this view by arguing that biomedically inducing more empathy may, in fact, diminish moral agency. We argue that this type (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  12.  18
    Correction to: Black Bioethics in the Age of Black Lives Matter.Keisha Ray, Faith E. Fletcher, Daphne O. Martschenko & Jennifer E. James - 2023 - Journal of Medical Humanities 44 (2):287-289.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  13.  32
    Holding Them Accountable: Organizational Commitments to Ending Systemic Anti‐Black Racism in Medicine and Public Health.Keisha S. Ray - 2022 - Hastings Center Report 52 (S1):46-49.
    Hastings Center Report, Volume 52, Issue S1, Page S46-S49, March‐April 2022.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  14.  15
    When People of Color Are Left out of Research, Science and the Public Loses.Keisha Shantel Ray - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 11 (4):238-240.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  15.  39
    We Are Not Okay: Moral Injury and a World on Fire.Keisha S. Ray - 2024 - American Journal of Bioethics 24 (4):11-12.
    After giving the name “burnout” to the experience of being overworked and undervalued and the physician and patient suffering that comes from it, many clinicians have sought to elucidate further wh...
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  37
    Intersectionality and Power Imbalances Clinicians of Color Face When Patients Request White Clinicians.Keisha Shantel Ray - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (2):25-26.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  17.  27
    When Black Health, Intersectionality, and Health Equity Meet a Pandemic.Keisha Ray - 2023 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 20 (4):585-590.
    Using the example of Black people’s inequitable COVID-19 outcomes and their health outcomes prior to the pandemic, I argue that the pandemic has forever changed how we should think about the conceptual and practical nature of health equity. From here on, we can no longer think of health equity without the concept of intersectionality. In particular, we must acknowledge that discrimination (e.g. sexism, ableism, racism, classism, etc.) within our social institutions intersect to withhold resources needed for health from people who (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Motivation's Pick-Me-Upper: Enhancing Performance Through Motivation-Enhancing Drugs.Keisha Shantel Ray - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 6 (1):50-51.
    Torben Kjærsgaard’s argues that the term “cognitive enhancement substances” is an inappropriate term considering that stimulants do not enhance cognition, but rather only enhance motivation. Therefore, he concludes that stimulants are best described as “performance maintenance” and not “performance enhancement.” I challenge his conclusion on the grounds that both life’s ordinary, daily activities and life’s extraordinary activities are types of performances necessary for living the kinds of lives that we want to live, which can be enhanced, not just maintained, with (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19.  20
    Narrating the Black Body in “Under the Skin” - Review of Linda Villarosa, 2022. Under the Skin: The Hidden Toll of Racism on American Lives and on the Health of Our Nation. Doubleday.Keisha Ray - 2024 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 33 (2):275-279.
    Poor health is not inherently a part of Black Americans’ bodies; poor health is not in our DNA. But as Linda Villarosa says in Under the Skin “something about being Black has led to the documented poor health of Black Americans.”1 Like many other scholars of Black health have said, Villarosa proposes, and evidence supports, that “the something is racism.”2 Villarosa attributes Black people’s generally inferior health outcomes in areas like pregnancy and birth, pain care, and cardiology to racism and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20.  19
    Black and Sleepless in a Nonideal World.Keisha Ray - 2021 - In Elizabeth Victor & Laura K. Guidry-Grimes (eds.), Applying Nonideal Theory to Bioethics: Living and Dying in a Nonideal World. New York: Springer. pp. 235-254.
    Black people experience lower quality and lesser quantity of sleep than white people. Researchers, however, do not believe that racial disparities in sleep sufficiency are caused by biological differences, but rather by various social differences, such as differences in sleeping environments and socioeconomic status. Racial disparities in sleep sufficiency are a matter of social justice because sleep is important to mental and physical health, meaning racial disparities in sleep sufficiency can contribute to unequal and unjust disparities in overall health. Racial (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21.  23
    Black Health: The Social, Political, and Cultural Determinants of Black People's Health.Keisha Ray - 2023 - New York, US: OUP Usa.
    Why do American Black people generally have worse health than American White people? To answer this question, “Black Health” dispels any notion that Black people have inferior bodies that are inherently susceptible to disease. This is simply false racial science that has been used to abuse Black people since our African ancestors were brought to America on slave ships. A genuine investigation into the status of Black people’s health requires us to acknowledge that race has always been a powerful social (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  27
    Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “Not Just ‘Study Drugs’ for The Rich: Stimulants as Moral Tools for Creating Opportunities for Socially Disadvantaged Students”.Keisha Shantel Ray - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (6):8-10.
    An argument in the cognitive enhancement literature is that using stimulants in populations of healthy but socially disadvantaged individuals mistakenly attributes pathology to nonpathological individuals who experience social inequalities. As the argument goes, using stimulants as cognitive-enhancing drugs to solve the social problem of poorly educated students in inadequate schools misattributes the problem as an individual medical problem, when it is really a collective sociopolitical problem. I challenge this argument on the grounds that not all types of enhancement have to (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23.  10
    The Case of Jahi McMath.Keisha Ray - 2014 - Voices in Bioethics 1.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24.  40
    Review of Jeffrey P. Spike and Rebecca Lunstroth, A Casebook in Interprofessional Ethics: A Succinct Introduction to Ethics for the Health Professions. [REVIEW]Keisha Shantel Ray - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (3):1-3.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark