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  1.  14
    Reciprocity in Quarantine: Observations from Wuhan’s COVID-19 Digital Landscapes.Yanping Ni, Morris Fabbri, Chi Zhang & Kearsley A. Stewart - 2020 - Asian Bioethics Review 12 (4):435-457.
    The 2003 SARS pandemic heralded the return of quarantine as a vital part of twenty-first century public health practice. Over the last two decades, MERS, Ebola, and other emerging infectious diseases each posed unique challenges for applying quarantine ethics lessons learned from the 2003 SARS-CoV-1 outbreak. In an increasingly interdependent and connected global world, the use of quarantine to contain the spread of SARS-CoV-2, or COVID-19, similarly poses new and unexpected ethical challenges. In this essay, we look beyond standard debates (...)
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  2.  14
    Teaching Corner: The Prospective Case Study: A Pedagogical Innovation for Teaching Global Health Ethics.Kearsley A. Stewart - 2015 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 12 (1):57-61.
    Over the past decade, global health has emerged as one of the fastest growing academic programs in the United States. Ethics training is cited widely as an essential feature of U.S. global health programs, but generally it is not deeply integrated into the global health teaching and training curricula. A discussion about the pedagogy of teaching global health ethics is long overdue; to date, only a few papers specifically engage with pedagogy rather than competencies or content. This paper explores the (...)
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  3.  16
    Can a human rights framework improve biomedical and social scientific HIV/AIDS research for African women?Kearsley A. Stewart - 2006 - Human Rights Review 7 (2):130-136.
    In most countries in Africa, the epidemiologic profile of HIV/AIDS is significantly different from that of the USA or Europe. Women in Africa are as likely to be HIV positive as men, while young women are significantly more likely to be HIV positive than young men. How can health research in Africa be made more responsive and relevant to women’s health needs? And how would a human rights perspective change the conduct of biomedical and social scientific research on gender and (...)
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