Results for 'Kathleen Meghan Mcshane'

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  1. Reducing Implicit Racial Preferences: II. Intervention Effectiveness Across Time.Calvin K. Lai, Allison L. Skinner, Erin Cooley, Sohad Murrar, Markus Brauer, Thierry Devos, Jimmy Calanchini, Y. Jenny Xiao, Christina Pedram, Christopher K. Marshburn, Stefanie Simon, John C. Blanchar, Jennifer A. Joy-Gaba, John Conway, Liz Redford, Rick A. Klein, Gina Roussos, Fabian M. H. Schellhaas, Mason Burns, Xiaoqing Hu, Meghan C. McLean, Jordan R. Axt, Shaki Asgari, Kathleen Schmidt, Rachel Rubinstein, Maddalena Marini, Sandro Rubichi, Jiyun-Elizabeth L. Shin & Brian A. Nosek - 2016 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 145 (8):1001-1016.
  2. I—Kathleen Stock: Fictive Utterance and Imagining.Kathleen Stock - 2011 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 85 (1):145-161.
    A popular approach to defining fictive utterance says that, necessarily, it is intended to produce imagining. I shall argue that this is not falsified by the fact that some fictive utterances are intended to be believed, or are non-accidentally true. That this is so becomes apparent given a proper understanding of the relation of what one imagines to one's belief set. In light of this understanding, I shall then argue that being intended to produce imagining is sufficient for fictive utterance (...)
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  3.  25
    II–Kathleen Lennon.Kathleen Lennon - 1997 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 71 (1):37-54.
  4.  31
    More Brain Lesions: Kathleen V. Wilkes.Kathleen V. Wilkes - 1980 - Philosophy 55 (214):455-470.
    As philosophers of mind we seem to hold in common no very clear view about the relevance that work in psychology or the neurosciences may or may not have to our own favourite questions—even if we call the subject ‘philosophical psychology’. For example, in the literature we find articles on pain some of which do, some of which don't, rely more or less heavily on, for example, the work of Melzack and Wall; the puzzle cases used so extensively in discussions (...)
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  5.  76
    Feminist Epistemology as Local Epistemology: Kathleen Lennon.Kathleen Lennon - 1997 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 71 (1):37–54.
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  6.  21
    Feminist Epistemology as Local Epistemology: Kathleen Lennon.Kathleen Lennon - 1997 - Supplement to the Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 71 (1):37-54.
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  7.  24
    Why Agent-Caused Actions Are Not Lucky.Meghan Griffith - 2010 - American Philosophical Quarterly 47 (1):43-56.
    Philosophers like to worry about luck. And well they should. Luck poses potential difficulties for knowledge, moral appraisal, and freedom. The primary target of this paper will be the last of these concerns . Recent arguments from luck have been levied against libertarian accounts of free will, including agent-causal ones. One general goal of this paper will be to demonstrate the truth of an often overlooked claim about responsibility-undermining luck. Part of this task will include illustrating what is genuinely worrisome (...)
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  8.  33
    How Many Selves Make Me?1: Kathleen V. Wilkes.Kathleen V. Wilkes - 1991 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 29:235-243.
    The answer to the title question which I want to defend in this paper is ‘none’. That is: I doubt strongly that the notion of ‘a self’ has any use whatsoever as part of an explanans for the explanandum ‘person’.Put another way: I shall argue that the question itself is misguided, pointing the inquirer in quite the wrong direction by suggesting that the term ‘self’ points to something which can sustain a philosophically interesting or important degree of reification.
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  9.  7
    Time Biases: A Theory of Rational Planning and Personal Persistence.Meghan Sullivan - 2018 - Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
    Should you care less about your distant future? What about events in your life that have already happened? How should the passage of time affect your planning and assessment of your life? Most of us think it is irrational to ignore the future but harmless to dismiss the past. But this book argues that rationality requires temporal neutrality.
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  10. Transparency in Complex Computational Systems.Kathleen A. Creel - 2020 - Philosophy of Science 87 (4):568-589.
    Scientists depend on complex computational systems that are often ineliminably opaque, to the detriment of our ability to give scientific explanations and detect artifacts. Some philosophers have s...
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  11.  44
    The Problem of Denizenship: A Non-Domination Framework.Meghan Benton - 2014 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 17 (1):49-69.
  12. Anthropocentrism in Climate Ethics and Policy.Katie McShane - 2016 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 40 (1):189-204.
    Most ethicists agree that at least some nonhumans have interests that are of direct moral importance. Yet with very few exceptions, both climate ethics and climate policy have operated as though only human interests should be considered in formulating and evaluating climate policy. In this paper I argue that the anthropocentrism of current climate ethics and policy cannot be justified. I first describe the ethical claims upon which my analysis rests, arguing that they are no longer controversial within contemporary ethics. (...)
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  13. Problems for Temporary Existence in Tense Logic.Meghan Sullivan - 2012 - Philosophy Compass 7 (1):43-57.
    A‐theorists of time postulate a deep distinction between the present, past and future. Settling on an appropriate logic for such a view is no easy matter. This Philosophy Compass article describes one of the most vexing formal problems facing A‐theorists. It is commonly thought that A‐theories can only be formally expressed in a tense logic: a logic with operators like P and F . And it seems natural to think that we live in a world where objects come to exist (...)
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  14. Empathy and Its Role in Morality.Meghan Masto - 2015 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 53 (1):74-96.
    In this paper, I will argue, contra Prinz, that empathy is a crucial component of our moral lives. In particular, I argue that empathy is sometimes epistemologically necessary for identifying the right action; that empathy is sometimes psychologically necessary for motivating the agent to perform the right action; and that empathy is sometimes necessary for the agent to be most morally praiseworthy for an action. I begin by explaining what I take empathy to be. I then discuss some alleged problems (...)
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  15.  28
    Values and Harms in Loss and Damage.Katie McShane - 2017 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 20 (2):129-142.
    This paper explores what is meant by ‘loss and damage’ within the area of climate policy focused on loss and damage. I present two possible understandings of loss and damage, one of which connects it to harm and one of which connects it to value. In both cases, I argue that the best contemporary philosophical understandings of these concepts suggest a much broader range of losses and damages than is currently being considered within the usual discussions in this area. I (...)
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  16.  12
    Safety Culture in Financial Trading: An Analysis of Trading Misconduct Investigations.Meghan P. Leaver & Tom W. Reader - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 154 (2):461-481.
    High-profile failures in financial trading have led to interest in how the culture of the industry produces risky and unethical behaviours among traders. Yet, there is no established theoretical framework for studying this: we apply safety culture theory to examine ten recent high-profile trading mishaps investigated by the UK financial regulator. The results show that the dimensions of safety culture used to understand organisational accidents in domains such as aviation also explain failures in Risk Management within financial trading organisations. This (...)
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  17. Questions, Answers, and Knowledge- Wh.Meghan Masto - 2010 - Philosophical Studies 147 (3):395-413.
    Various authors have attempted to understand knowledge-wh—or knowledge ascriptions that include an interrogative complement. I present and explain some of the analyses offered so far and argue that each view faces some problems. I then present and explain a newanalysis of knowledge-wh that avoids these problems and that offers several other advantages. Finally I raise some problems for invariantism about knowledge-wh and I argue thatcontextualism about knowledge-wh fits nicely with a very natural understanding of the nature of questions.
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  18. The Minimal A-Theory.Meghan Sullivan - 2012 - Philosophical Studies 158 (2):149-174.
    Timothy Williamson thinks that every object is a necessary, eternal existent. In defense of his view, Williamson appeals primarily to considerations from modal and tense logic. While I am uncertain about his modal claims, I think there are good metaphysical reasons to believe permanentism: the principle that everything always exists. B-theorists of time and change have long denied that objects change with respect to unqualified existence. But aside from Williamson, nearly all A-theorists defend temporaryism: the principle that there are temporary (...)
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  19. Change We Can Believe In (and Assert).Meghan Sullivan - 2014 - Noûs 48 (3):474-495.
  20.  44
    Reply by Kathleen Stock.Kathleen Stock - 2019 - British Journal of Aesthetics 59 (2):219-225.
    I am extremely grateful to all commentators for such patient, generous, and stimulating contributions. What follows are some thoughts to enrich the conversation, but these are by no means intended to be definitive answers to the worries they have raised.
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  21. Does Free Will Remain a Mystery? A Response to Van Inwagen.Meghan Elizabeth Griffith - 2005 - Philosophical Studies 124 (3):261-269.
    In this paper, I argue against Peter van Inwagen’s claim (in “Free Will Remains a Mystery”), that agent-causal views of free will could do nothing to solve the problem of free will (specifically, the problem of chanciness). After explaining van Inwagen’s argument, I argue that he does not consider all possible manifestations of the agent-causal position. More importantly, I claim that, in any case, van Inwagen appears to have mischaracterized the problem in some crucial ways. Once we are clear on (...)
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  22.  65
    The Tyranny of the Enfranchised Majority? The Accountability of States to Their Non-Citizen Population.Meghan Benton - 2010 - Res Publica 16 (4):397-413.
    The debate between legal constitutionalists and critics of constitutional rights and judicial review is an old and lively one. While the protection of minorities is a pivotal aspect of this debate, the protection of disenfranchised minorities has received little attention. Policy-focused discussion—of the merits of the Human Rights Act in Britain for example—often cites protection of non-citizen migrants, but the philosophical debate does not. Non-citizen residents or ‘denizens’ therefore provide an interesting test case for the theory of rights as trumps (...)
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  23.  18
    Reason, Truth and History.Kathleen Okruhlik - 1984 - Philosophy of Science 51 (4):692-694.
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  24.  48
    The Role of Awe in Environmental Ethics.Katie Mcshane - 2018 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 76 (4):473-484.
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  25.  5
    Perception of Speech Reflects Optimal Use of Probabilistic Speech Cues.Meghan Clayards, Michael K. Tanenhaus, Richard N. Aslin & Robert A. Jacobs - 2008 - Cognition 108 (3):804-809.
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  26. Environmental Ethics: An Overview.Katie McShane - 2009 - Philosophy Compass 4 (3):407-420.
    This essay provides an overview of the field of environmental ethics. I sketch the major debates in the field from its inception in the 1970s to today, explaining both the central tenets of the schools of thought within the field and the arguments that have been given for and against them. I describe the main trends within the field as a whole and review some of the criticisms that have been offered of prevailing views.
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  27. Is Consciousness Important?Kathleen V. Wilkes - 1984 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 35 (September):223-43.
    The paper discusses the utility of the notion of consciousness for the behavioural and brain sciences. It describes four distinctively different senses of 'conscious', and argues that to cope with the heterogeneous phenomena loosely indicated thereby, these sciences not only do not but should not discuss them in terms of 'consciousness'. It is thus suggested that 'the problem' allegedly posed to scientists by consciousness is unreal; one need neither adopt a realist stance with respect to it, nor include the term (...)
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  28.  48
    Personal Volatility.Meghan Sullivan - 2017 - Philosophical Issues 27 (1):343-363.
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  29.  79
    An A-Theory Without Tense Operators.Meghan Sullivan - 2016 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 46 (4-5):735-758.
    A-theorists think there is a fundamental difference between the present and other times. This concern shows up in what kinds of properties they take to be instantiated, what objects they think exist and how they formalize their views. Nearly every contemporary A-theorist assumes that her metaphysics requires a tense logic – a logic with operators like and. In this paper, I show that there is at least one viable A-theory that does not require a logic with tense operators. And I (...)
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  30.  18
    Perception of Speech Reflects Optimal Use of Probabilistic Speech Cues.Robert A. Jacobs Meghan Clayards, Michael K. Tanenhaus, Richard N. Aslin - 2008 - Cognition 108 (3):804.
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  31.  99
    Neurophilosophy: Toward a Unified Theory of the Mind/Brain.Kathleen A. Akins - 1990 - Journal of Philosophy 87 (2):93-102.
  32.  20
    Consciousness and Commissurotomy: Kathleen V. Wilkes.Kathleen V. Wilkes - 1978 - Philosophy 53 (204):185-199.
    Commissurotomy surgery has lately attracted considerable philosophical attention. It has seemed to some that the surgical scalpel that bisects the brain bisects consciousness and the mind as well; and that the ordinary concept of a person is thereby most seriously threatened. I shall assess the extent of the threat, arguing that it is overestimated. The argument begins with section III; section II, which describes the operation and its effects, should be omitted by those already familiar with these facts.
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  33. Anthropocentrism Vs. Nonanthropocentrism: Why Should We Care?Mcshane Katie - 2007 - Environmental Values 16 (May):169-186.
    Many recent critical discussions of anthropocentrism have focused on Bryan Norton's 'convergence hypothesis': the claim that both anthropocentric and nonanthropocentric ethics will recommend the same environmentally responsible behaviours and policies. I argue that even if we grant the truth of Norton's convergence hypothesis, there are still good reasons to worry about anthropocentric ethics. Ethics legitimately raises questions about how to feel, not just about which actions to take or which policies to adopt. From the point of view of norms for (...)
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  34.  29
    McShane's Puzzles: Apologia for Those Who Flunk Them.Frederick E. Crowe - 2003 - Journal of Macrodynamic Analysis 3:186-193.
    Philip McShane has had as one of his leisure specialties the provision of tantalising puzzles which are meant to provide samples of insight but sometimes, instead of promoting insight, reduce his readers to angry frustration. I will take as point of departure for my reflections a single puzzle Philip once presented on his own to some learned society – I forget which. Those present were invited to find the meaning of the letters SMTWTFS; when it was clear they were (...)
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  35.  69
    Modal Logic as Methodology.Meghan Sullivan - 2014 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 88 (3):734-743.
  36.  5
    Randomness, Statistics and Emergence.Philip Mcshane - 1973 - Philosophy of Science 40 (3):468-469.
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  37.  10
    The Bodily Nature of Consciousness: Sartre and Contemporary Philosophy of Mind.Kathleen V. Wider - 2018 - Cornell University Press.
    In this work, Kathleen V. Wider discusses Jean-Paul Sartre's analysis of consciousness in Being and Nothingness in light of recent work by analytic philosophers, psychologists, and neuroscientists. She brings together phenomenological and scientific understandings of the nature of consciousness and argues that the two approaches can strengthen and suppport each other. Work on consciousness from two very different philosophical traditions—the continental and analytic—contributes to her explanation of the deep-seated intuition that all consciousness is self-consciousness.
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  38.  19
    Simulating Other People Changes the Self.Meghan L. Meyer, Zidong Zhao & Diana I. Tamir - forthcoming - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General.
  39.  1
    Gurdjieff. Seeker of the Truth. By Kathleen Riordan Speeth, Ira Friedlander. Bibliogr.Kathleen Riordan Speeth - 1980 - Wildwood House.
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  40.  23
    Social Working Memory: Neurocognitive Networks and Directions for Future Research.Meghan L. Meyer & Matthew D. Lieberman - 2012 - Frontiers in Psychology 3.
  41.  56
    Only Imagine: Fiction, Interpretation and Imagination.Kathleen Stock - 2017 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    In the first half of this book, I offer a theory of fictional content or, as it is sometimes known, ‘fictional truth’.The theory of fictional content I argue for is ‘extreme intentionalism’. The basic idea – very roughly, in ways which are made precise in the book - is that the fictional content of a particular text is equivalent to exactly what the author of the text intended the reader to imagine. The second half of the book is concerned with (...)
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  42.  14
    Incidental Regulation of Attraction: The Neural Basis of the Derogation of Attractive Alternatives in Romantic Relationships.Meghan L. Meyer, Elliot T. Berkman, Johan C. Karremans & Matthew D. Lieberman - 2011 - Cognition and Emotion 25 (3):490-505.
  43.  15
    The Joint Effects of Justice Climate, Group Moral Identity, and Corporate Social Responsibility on the Prosocial and Deviant Behaviors of Groups.Meghan A. Thornton & Deborah E. Rupp - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 137 (4):677-697.
    Pulling from theories of social exchange, deonance, and fairness heuristics, this study focuses on the relationship between overall justice climate and both the prosocial and deviant behaviors of groups. Specifically, it considers two contextual boundary conditions on this effect—corporate social responsibility and group moral identity. Results from a laboratory experiment are presented, which show a significant effect for overall justice climate and a two-way interaction between overall justice climate and CSR on group-level prosocial and deviant behaviors, and a marginally significant (...)
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  44. The Unfinished Revolution:How a New Generation is Reshaping Family, Work, and Gender in America: How a New Generation is Reshaping Family, Work, and Gender in America.Kathleen Gerson - 2009 - Oup Usa.
    The vast changes in family life-the rise of single, same-sex, and two-paycheck parents-have often been blamed for declining morality and unhappy children. Drawing upon pioneering research with the children of the gender revolution, Kathleen Gerson reveals that it is not a lack of family values, but rigid social and economic forces that make it difficult to live out those values. The Unfinished Revolution makes clear recommendations for a new flexibility at work and at home that benefits families, encourages a (...)
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  45.  15
    The Greek Aulos. By Kathleen Schlesinger. Pp. 1 + 577; Pl. 18. London: Methuen, 1939. £2 2s.R. P. Winnington-Ingram & Kathleen Schlesinger - 1939 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 59 (2):305-307.
  46. Freedom and Trying: Understanding Agent-Causal Exertions. [REVIEW]Meghan Griffith - 2007 - Acta Analytica 22 (1):16-28.
    In this paper, I argue that trying is the locus of freedom and moral responsibility. Thus, any plausible view of free and responsible action must accommodate and account for free tryings. I then consider a version of agent causation whereby the agent directly causes her tryings. On this view, the agent is afforded direct control over her efforts and there is no need to posit—as other agent-causal theorists do—an uncaused event. I discuss the potential advantages of this sort of view, (...)
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  47.  70
    Free Will: The Basics.Meghan Griffith - 2013 - Routledge.
    The question of whether humans are free to make their own decisions has long been debated and it continues to be a controversial topic today. In _Free Will: The Basics_ readers are provided with a clear and accessible introduction to this central but challenging philosophical problem. The questions which are discussed include: Does free will exist? Or is it illusory? Can we be free even if everything is determined by a chain of causes? If our actions are not determined, does (...)
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  48.  16
    Love of God and Neighbor: Living Charity in Aquinas’ Ethics.Meghan J. Clark - 2011 - New Blackfriars 92 (1040):415-430.
  49.  19
    Currents in Contemporary Ethics.Meghan K. Talbott - 2007 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35 (2):316-319.
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  50. XIV—Sexual Orientation: What Is It?Kathleen Stock - 2019 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 119 (3):295-319.
    I defend an account of sexual orientation, understood as a reflexive disposition to be sexually attracted to people of a particular biological Sex or Sexes. An orientation is identified in terms of two aspects: the Sex of the subject who has the disposition, and whether that Sex is the same as, or different to, the Sex to which the subject is disposed to be attracted. I explore this account in some detail and defend it from several challenges. In doing so, (...)
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