17 found
Order:
  1.  23
    Judgments About Fact and Fiction by Children From Religious and Nonreligious Backgrounds.Kathleen H. Corriveau, Eva E. Chen & Paul L. Harris - 2015 - Cognitive Science 39 (2):353-382.
    In two studies, 5- and 6-year-old children were questioned about the status of the protagonist embedded in three different types of stories. In realistic stories that only included ordinary events, all children, irrespective of family background and schooling, claimed that the protagonist was a real person. In religious stories that included ordinarily impossible events brought about by divine intervention, claims about the status of the protagonist varied sharply with exposure to religion. Children who went to church or were enrolled in (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  2.  5
    Epistemic justifications for belief in the unobservable: The impact of minority status.Telli Davoodi, Yixin Kelly Cui, Jennifer M. Clegg, Fang E. Yan, Ayse Payir, Paul L. Harris & Kathleen H. Corriveau - 2020 - Cognition 200 (C):104273.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  3.  17
    Young Children’s Deference to a Consensus Varies by Culture and Judgment Setting.Kathleen H. Corriveau, Elizabeth Kim, Ge Song & Paul L. Harris - 2013 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 13 (3-4):367-381.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  4.  6
    Investigating Science Together: Inquiry-Based Training Promotes Scientific Conversations in Parent-Child Interactions.Ian L. Chandler-Campbell, Kathryn A. Leech & Kathleen H. Corriveau - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  5.  23
    Cognitive Mechanisms Associated with Children’s Selective Teaching.Kathleen H. Corriveau, Samuel Ronfard & Yixin Kelly Cui - 2018 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 9 (4):831-848.
    Whereas a large body of research has focused on the development of children as learners, relatively little research has focused on the development of children as teachers. Moreover, even less research has focused on the potential cognitive mechanisms associated with high-quality teaching. Here, we review evidence that children’s selective teaching is associated with at least three cognitive skills: the ability to represent mental states, the ability to infer mental states in real-time, as well as executive function skills. We note potential (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  6.  40
    Abraham Lincoln and Harry Potter: Children’s differentiation between historical and fantasy characters.Kathleen H. Corriveau, Angie L. Kim, Courtney E. Schwalen & Paul L. Harris - 2009 - Cognition 113 (2):213-225.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  7.  2
    Embedding Scientific Explanations Into Storybooks Impacts Children’s Scientific Discourse and Learning.Kathryn A. Leech, Amanda S. Haber, Youmna Jalkh & Kathleen H. Corriveau - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  8.  13
    The Theoretical and Methodological Opportunities Afforded by Guided Play With Young Children.Yue Yu, Patrick Shafto, Elizabeth Bonawitz, Scott C.-H. Yang, Roberta M. Golinkoff, Kathleen H. Corriveau, Kathy Hirsh-Pasek & Fei Xu - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  9.  9
    Children begin with the same start-up software, but their software updates are cultural.Jennifer M. Clegg & Kathleen H. Corriveau - 2017 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 40.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  10.  53
    Credulity and the development of selective trust in early childhood.Paul L. Harris, Kathleen H. Corriveau, Elisabeth S. Pasquini, Melissa Koenig, Maria Fusaro & Fabrice Clément - 2012 - In Michael Beran, Johannes Brandl, Josef Perner & Joëlle Proust (eds.), The Foundations of Metacognition. Oxford University Press. pp. 193.
  11.  5
    Learning about teaching requires thinking about the learner.Kathleen H. Corriveau - 2015 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 38.
    Kline argues for an expanded taxonomy of teaching focusing on the adaptive behaviors needed to solve learning problems. Absent from her analysis is an explicit definition of learning, or a discussion of the iterative nature of the relationship between teaching and learning. Including the learner in the discussion may help to distinguish among the adaptive values of different teaching behaviors.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  12. Parents’ Beliefs about Their Influence on Children’s Scientific and Religious Views: Perspectives from Iran, China and the United States.Niamh McLoughlin, Telli Davoodi, Yixin Kelly Cui, Jennifer M. Clegg, Paul L. Harris & Kathleen H. Corriveau - 2021 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 21 (1-2):49-75.
    Parents in Iran, China and the United States were asked 1) about their potential influence on their children’s religious and scientific views and 2) to consider a situation in which their children expressed dissent. Iranian and US parents endorsed their influence on the children’s beliefs in the two domains. By contrast, Chinese parents claimed more influence in the domain of science than religion. Most parents spoke of influencing their children via Parent-only mechanisms in each domain, although US parents did spontaneously (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  5
    Children's Ideas About What Can Really Happen: The Impact of Age and Religious Background.Ayse Payir, Niamh Mcloughlin, Yixin Kelly Cui, Telli Davoodi, Jennifer M. Clegg, Paul L. Harris & Kathleen H. Corriveau - 2021 - Cognitive Science 45 (10):e13054.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  11
    But how does it develop? Adopting a sociocultural lens to the development of intergroup bias among children.Niamh McLoughlin & Kathleen H. Corriveau - 2019 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 42.
    We argue that adopting a sociocultural lens to the origins of intergroup bias is important for understanding the nature of attacking and defending behavior at a group level. We specifically propose that the potential divergence in the development of in-group affiliation and out-group derogation supports De Dreu and Gross's framework but does indicate that more emphasis on early sociocultural input is required.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  6
    Putting social cognitive mechanisms back into cumulative technological culture: Social interactions serve as a mechanism for children's early knowledge acquisition.Amanda S. Haber & Kathleen H. Corriveau - 2020 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 43.
    Osiurak and Reynaud offer a unified cognitive approach to cumulative technological culture, arguing that it begins with non-social cognitive skills that allow humans to learn and develop new technical information. Drawing on research focusing on how children acquire knowledge through interactions others, we argue that social learning is essential for humans to acquire technical information.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  7
    A developmental perspective on the cultural evolution of prosocial religious beliefs.Kathleen H. Corriveau & Eva E. Chen - 2016 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 39.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. Considering individual differences and variability is important in the development of the bifocal stance theory.Hannah Puttre & Kathleen H. Corriveau - 2022 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 45:e266.
    Jagiello and colleagues offer a bifocal stance theory of cultural evolution for understanding how individuals flexibly choose between instrumental and ritual stances in social learning. We argue that the role of culture, developmental age-related differences, and the intersectionality of these and other individual's identities need to be more fully considered in this theoretical framework.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark