Results for 'Katherine S. Button'

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  1.  61
    Understanding emotion: Lessons from anxiety.Katherine S. Button, Glyn Lewis, Marcus R. Munafò, Kristen A. Lindquist, Tor D. Wager, Hedy Kober, Eliza Bliss-Moreau & Lisa Feldman Barrett - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (3):145.
    We agree that conceptualisation is key in understanding the brain basis of emotion. We argue that by conflating facial emotion recognition with subjective emotion experience, Lindquist et al. understate the importance of biological predisposition in emotion. We use examples from the anxiety disorders to illustrate the distinction between these two phenomena, emphasising the importance of both emotional hardware and contextual learning.
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  2.  11
    Academics and the ‘easy button’: lessons from pesticide resistance management.Katherine Dentzman - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (4):1179-1183.
    The siren call of easy solutions to socio-agricultural problems is often studied as a reflection of anthropocentric ideologies espousing faith in human ingenuity to overcome, often with technological innovations, any hurdles thrown at us. This theme has been reflected especially strongly in my own research on pesticide resistance, with farmers continually referring to the necessity of an ‘easy button’ or ‘silver bullet’ (usually in the form of a new chemical herbicide) that will solve the extremely complex and multi-dimensional problem (...)
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  3.  8
    Rapid Acquisition of Phonological Alternations by Infants.James L. Morgan Katherine S. White, Sharon Peperkamp, Cecilia Kirk - 2008 - Cognition 107 (1):238.
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  4.  24
    Rapid acquisition of phonological alternations by infants.Katherine S. White, Sharon Peperkamp, Cecilia Kirk & James L. Morgan - 2008 - Cognition 107 (1):238-265.
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  5.  13
    Feedback controls and G2 checkpoints: Fission yeast as a model system.Katherine S. Sheldrick & Antony M. Carr - 1993 - Bioessays 15 (12):775-782.
    Dependency relationships within the cell cycle allow cells to arrest the cycle reversibly in response to agents or conditions that interfere with specific aspects of its normal progression. In addition, overlapping pathways exist which also arrest the cell cycle in response to DNA damage. Collectively, these control mechanisms have become known as checkpoints. Analysis of checkpoints is facilitated by the fact that dependency relationships within the cell cycle, such as the dependency of mitosis on the completion of DNA synthesis, and (...)
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  6.  21
    Luce Irigary.Katherine S. Stephenson - 1988 - Semiotics:412-417.
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  7.  18
    Ethics and the Law.Katherine S. Moffeit - 1994 - Professional Ethics, a Multidisciplinary Journal 3 (1):47-70.
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  8.  48
    The discrimination of relative onset-time of the components of certain speech and nonspeech patterns.A. M. Liberman, Katherine S. Harris, Jo Ann Kinney & H. Lane - 1961 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 61 (5):379.
  9.  17
    Personality Disruption as Mental Torture: The CIA, Interrogational Abuse, and the U.S. Torture Act.David Luban & Katherine S. Newell - 2019 - Georgetown Law Journal 108 (2).
    This Article is a contribution to the torture debate. It argues that the abusive interrogation tactics used by the United States in what was then called the “global war on terrorism” are, unequivocally, torture under U.S. law. To some readers, this might sound like déjà vu all over again. Hasn’t this issue been picked over for nearly fifteen years? It has, but we think the legal analysis we offer has been mostly overlooked. We argue that the basic character of the (...)
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  10. Introducing the Oxford Vocal (OxVoc) Sounds database: a validated set of non-acted affective sounds from human infants, adults, and domestic animals.Christine E. Parsons, Katherine S. Young, Michelle G. Craske, Alan L. Stein & Morten L. Kringelbach - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
  11.  27
    Three Lectures on Modern ArtLayman's Guide to Modern Art: Painting for a Scientific Age.H. H., Katherine S. Dreier, James Johnson Sweeney, Naum Gabo, Mary Chalmers Rathbun & Bartlett H. Hayes - 1950 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 9 (2):148.
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  12.  20
    Can a few non‐coding mutations make a human brain?Lucía F. Franchini & Katherine S. Pollard - 2015 - Bioessays 37 (10):1054-1061.
    The recent finding that the human version of a neurodevelopmental enhancer of the Wnt receptor Frizzled 8 (FZD8) gene alters neural progenitor cell cycle timing and brain size is a step forward to understanding human brain evolution. The human brain is distinctive in terms of its cognitive abilities as well as its susceptibility to neurological disease. Identifying which of the millions of genomic changes that occurred during human evolution led to these and other uniquely human traits is extremely challenging. Recent (...)
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  13.  9
    And then I saw her race: Race-based expectations affect infants’ word processing.Drew Weatherhead & Katherine S. White - 2018 - Cognition 177 (C):87-97.
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  14.  16
    Wenceslaus Hollar, Delineator of His TimeTeoria de la Sensibilidad.M. Stokstad, Katherine S. van Eerde & Xavier Rubert de Ventos - 1971 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 29 (4):566.
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  15.  7
    Ethics and the Law.Steven M. Mintz & Katherine S. Moffeit - 1994 - Professional Ethics, a Multidisciplinary Journal 3 (1):47-70.
  16. Problems and alignments in African labor.Katherine S. Van Eerde - forthcoming - Social Research: An International Quarterly.
     
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  17. Socialism in Western Europe at Mid-Century.Katherine S. Van Eerde - forthcoming - Social Research: An International Quarterly.
  18. Predicting Students’ Intention to Plagiarize: an Ethical Theoretical Framework.S. K. Camara, Susanna Eng-Ziskin, Laura Wimberley, Katherine S. Dabbour & Carmen M. Lee - 2017 - Journal of Academic Ethics 15 (1):43-58.
    This article investigates whether acts of plagiarism are predictable. Through a deductive, quantitative method, this study examines 517 students and their motivation and intention to plagiarize. More specifically, this study uses an ethical theoretical framework called the Theory of Reasoned Action and Planned Behavior to proffer five hypotheses about cognitive, relational, and social processing relevant to ethical decision making. Data results indicate that although most respondents reported that plagiarism was wrong, students with strong intentions to plagiarize had a more positive (...)
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  19.  27
    Motor theory of speech perception: A reply to Lane's critical review.Michael Studdert-Kennedy, Alvin M. Liberman, Katherine S. Harris & Franklin S. Cooper - 1970 - Psychological Review 77 (3):234-249.
  20.  51
    Word-level information influences phonetic learning in adults and infants.Naomi H. Feldman, Emily B. Myers, Katherine S. White, Thomas L. Griffiths & James L. Morgan - 2013 - Cognition 127 (3):427-438.
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  21.  20
    Virtual Reality Reward Training for Anhedonia: A Pilot Study.Kelly Chen, Nora Barnes-Horowitz, Michael Treanor, Michael Sun, Katherine S. Young & Michelle G. Craske - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    Anhedonia is a risk factor for suicide and poor treatment response in depressed individuals. Most evidence-based psychological therapies target symptoms of heightened negative affect instead of deficits in positive affect and typically show little benefit for anhedonia. Viewing positive scenes through virtual reality has been shown to increase positive affect and holds great promise for addressing anhedonic symptoms. In this pilot study, six participants with clinically significant depression completed 13 sessions of exposure to positive scenes in a controlled VR environment. (...)
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  22.  9
    The Prevalence of Hyperpalatable Baby Foods and Exposure During Infancy: A Preliminary Investigation.Kai Ling Kong, Tera L. Fazzino, Kaitlyn M. Rohde & Katherine S. Morris - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    Objective:To characterize the prevalence of hyperpalatable foods (HPF) among baby foods in the U.S. and examine the prevalence of HPF exposure and consumption from both baby food and adult food sources among infants aged 9–15 months.Methods:A U.S. baby food database as well as baby foods from three 24-h dietary recalls of 147 infants were used to identify baby foods as HPF per previous publication. HPF exposure was defined as intake of any HPF during the 3-day measurement period. To determine the (...)
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  23.  15
    The Role of Decision-Making Capacity in Gathering Collateral Information.Daniel Moseley, Gary J. Gala & Katherine S. Dickson - 2023 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 34 (2):123-127.
    Psychiatric disorders usually do not have characteristic physical exam findings, imaging, or lab values. Psychiatrists therefore diagnose and treat patients largely based on reported or observed behavior, which makes collateral information from a patient’s close contacts especially pertinent to an accurate diagnosis. The American Psychiatric Association considers communication with patients’ supports a best practice when the patient provides informed consent or does not object to the communication. However, situations arise in which a patient’s objection to such communication is the product (...)
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  24.  65
    The price of international business morality: Twenty years under the foreign corrupt practices act. [REVIEW]Jack G. Kaikati, George M. Sullivan, John M. Virgo, T. R. Carr & Katherine S. Virgo - 2000 - Journal of Business Ethics 26 (3):213 - 222.
    Last year marked the 20th anniversary of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) of 1977. The FCPA is the first and only statute prohibiting bribery and other corrupt business practices by U.S. citizens and companies conducting business overseas. This paper provides an overview of the FCPA during the two decades of its existence. More specifically, the objectives of this paper are four-fold. First, the paper provides background information about the FCPA of 1977 and subsequent amendments in 1988. Second, the paper (...)
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  25.  32
    Do infants show social preferences for people differing in race?Katherine D. Kinzler & Elizabeth S. Spelke - 2011 - Cognition 119 (1):1-9.
  26.  13
    Children’s referent selection and word learning.Katherine E. Twomey, Anthony F. Morse, Angelo Cangelosi & Jessica S. Horst - forthcoming - Interaction Studies. Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies / Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies:101-127.
    It is well-established that toddlers can correctly select a novel referent from an ambiguous array in response to a novel label. There is also a growing consensus that robust word learning requires repeated label-object encounters. However, the effect of the context in which a novel object is encountered is less well-understood. We present two embodied neural network replications of recent empirical tasks, which demonstrated that the context in which a target object is encountered is fundamental to referent selection and word (...)
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  27.  9
    “Frequently Asked Questions” About Genetic Engineering in Farm Animals: A Frame Analysis.Katherine E. Koralesky, Heidi J. S. Tworek, Marina A. G. von Keyserlingk & Daniel M. Weary - 2024 - Food Ethics 9 (1):1-20.
    Calls for public engagement on emerging agricultural technologies, including genetic engineering of farm animals, have resulted in the development of information that people can interact and engage with online, including “Frequently Asked Questions” (FAQs) developed by organizations seeking to inform or influence the debate. We conducted a frame analysis of FAQs webpages about genetic engineering of farm animals developed by different organizations to describe how questions and answers are presented. We categorized FAQs as having a regulatory frame (emphasizing or challenging (...)
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  28.  23
    Children's referent selection and word learning: Insights from a developmental robotic system.Katherine E. Twomey, Anthony F. Morse, Angelo Cangelosi & Jessica S. Horst - 2016 - Interaction Studies 17 (1):101-127.
    This article is currently available as a free download on Ingenta Connect.
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  29.  18
    Children's referent selection and word learning.Katherine E. Twomey, Anthony F. Morse, Angelo Cangelosi & Jessica S. Horst - 2016 - Interaction Studies 17 (1):101-127.
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  30.  11
    Stimulation over primary motor cortex during action observation impairs effector recognition.Katherine R. Naish, Brittany Barnes & Sukhvinder S. Obhi - 2016 - Cognition 149 (C):84-94.
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  31. Ontological Innocence.Katherine Hawley - 2014 - In A. J. Cotnoir & Donald L. M. Baxter (eds.), Composition as Identity. Oxford University Press. pp. 70-89.
    In this chapter, I examine Lewis's ideas about ontological innocence, ontological commitment and double-counting, in his discussion of composition as identity in Parts of Classes. I attempt to understand these primarily as epistemic or methodological claims: how far can we get down this route without adopting radical metaphysical theses about composition as identity?
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  32.  81
    The discrimination of speech sounds within and across phoneme boundaries.Alvin M. Liberman, Katherine Safford Harris, Howard S. Hoffman & Belver C. Griffith - 1957 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 54 (5):358.
  33.  16
    Who Are You Going to Call? Primary Care Patients’ Disclosure Decisions Regarding Direct–to–Consumer Genetic Testing.Katherine Wasson, Sara Cherny, Tonya Nashay Sanders, Nancy S. Hogan & Kathy J. Helzlsouer - 2014 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 4 (1):53-68.
    Background: Direct–to–consumer genetic testing (DTCGT) offers risk estimates for a variety of complex diseases and conditions, yet little is known about its impact on actual users, including their decisions about sharing the information gleaned from testing. Ethical considerations include the impact of unsolicited genetic information with variable validity and clinical utility on relatives, and the possible burden to the health care system if revealed to physicians. Aims: The qualitative study explored primary care patients’ views, attitudes, and decision making considerations regarding (...)
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  34.  54
    Mapping the Conceptual Space of Jealousy.Katherine Hanson Sobraske, James S. Boster & Steven J. Gaulin - 2013 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 41 (3):249-270.
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  35. Core knowledge.Elizabeth S. Spelke & Katherine D. Kinzler - 2007 - Developmental Science 10 (1):89-96.
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  36.  7
    Water and Meadow Views Both Afford Perceived but Not Performance-Based Attention Restoration: Results From Two Experimental Studies.Katherine A. Johnson, Annabelle Pontvianne, Vi Ly, Rui Jin, Jonathan Haris Januar, Keitaro Machida, Leisa D. Sargent, Kate E. Lee, Nicholas S. G. Williams & Kathryn J. H. Williams - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    Attention Restoration Theory proposes that exposure to natural environments helps to restore attention. For sustained attention—the ongoing application of focus to a task, the effect appears to be modest, and the underlying mechanisms of attention restoration remain unclear. Exposure to nature may improve attention performance through many means: modulation of alertness and one’s connection to nature were investigated here, in two separate studies. In both studies, participants performed the Sustained Attention to Response Task before and immediately after viewing a meadow, (...)
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  37.  26
    Resting-State Neurophysiological Abnormalities in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: A Magnetoencephalography Study.Amy S. Badura-Brack, Elizabeth Heinrichs-Graham, Timothy J. McDermott, Katherine M. Becker, Tara J. Ryan, Maya M. Khanna & Tony W. Wilson - 2017 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 11.
  38.  16
    Prescribing safe supply: ethical considerations for clinicians.Katherine Duthie, Eric Mathison, Helgi Eyford & S. Monty Ghosh - 2023 - Journal of Medical Ethics 49 (6):377-382.
    The COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated the drug poisoning epidemic in a number of ways: individuals use alone more often, there is decreased access to harm reduction services and there has been an increase in the toxicity of the unregulated drug supply. In response to the crisis, clinicians, policy makers and people who use drugs have been seeking ways to prevent the worst harms of unregulated opioid use. One prominent idea is safe supply. One form of safe supply enlists clinicians to (...)
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  39. There's no time like the present.Tim Button - 2006 - Analysis 66 (2):130–135.
    No-futurists ('growing block theorists') hold that that the past and the present are real, but that the future is not. The present moment is therefore privileged: it is the last moment of time. Craig Bourne (2002) and David Braddon-Mitchell (2004) have argued that this position is unmotivated, since the privilege of presentness comes apart from the indexicality of 'this moment'. I respond that no-futurists should treat 'x is real-as-of y' as a nonsymmetric relation. Then different moments are real-as-of different times. (...)
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  40.  5
    Open to Encounter.Katherine Withy - 2023 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 44 (1):245-265.
    One of Martin Heidegger’s enduring philosophical legacies is his overall vision of what it is to be us. We—whoever that turns out to include—are cases of Dasein, and as such we are distinctively open to entities, including others and ourselves. In this essay, I paint a picture of that openness that aims to capture why Heidegger’s vision has so powerfully gripped so many. Drawing on Heidegger’s thought both early and late, I present a synoptic view of us as open to (...)
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  41.  43
    All about us, but never about us: The three-pronged potency of prejudice.S. Alexander Haslam & Katherine J. Reynolds - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (6):435-436.
    Three points that are implicit in Dixon et al.'s paradigm-challenging paper serve to make prejudice potent. First, prejudice reflects understandings of social identity usthem that are shared within particular groups. Second, these understandings are actively promoted by leaders who represent and advance in-group identity. Third, prejudice is identified in out-groups, not in-groups.
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  42. Realistic structuralism's identity crisis: A hybrid solution.Tim Button - 2006 - Analysis 66 (3):216–222.
    Keränen (2001) raises an argument against realistic (ante rem) structuralism: where a mathematical structure has a non-trivial automorphism, distinct indiscernible positions within the structure cannot be shown to be non-identical using only the properties and relations of that structure. Ladyman (2005) responds by allowing our identity criterion to include 'irreflexive two-place relations'. I note that this does not solve the problem for structures with indistinguishable positions, i.e. positions that have all the same properties as each other and exactly the same (...)
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  43.  24
    Do we “fear for the worst” or “Hope for the best” in thinking about the unexpected?: Factors affecting the valence of unexpected outcomes reported for everyday scenarios.Molly S. Quinn, Katherine Campbell & Mark T. Keane - 2021 - Cognition 208 (C):104520.
    Though we often “fear the worst”, worrying that unexpectedly bad things will happen, there are times when we “hope for the best”, imagining that unexpectedly good things will happen, too. The paper explores how the valence of the current situation influences people's imagining of unexpected future events when participants were instructed to think of “something unexpected”. In Experiment 1, participants (N = 127) were asked to report unexpected events to everyday scenarios under different instructional conditions (e.g., asked for “good” or (...)
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  44. Mathematical Internal Realism.Tim Button - 2022 - In Sanjit Chakraborty & James Ferguson Conant (eds.), Engaging Putnam. Berlin, Germany: De Gruyter. pp. 157-182.
    In “Models and Reality” (1980), Putnam sketched a version of his internal realism as it might arise in the philosophy of mathematics. Here, I will develop that sketch. By combining Putnam’s model-theoretic arguments with Dummett’s reflections on Gödelian incompleteness, we arrive at (what I call) the Skolem-Gödel Antinomy. In brief: our mathematical concepts are perfectly precise; however, these perfectly precise mathematical concepts are manifested and acquired via a formal theory, which is understood in terms of a computable system of proof, (...)
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  45.  14
    The Hopkins-Oxford Psychedelics Ethics (HOPE) Working Group Consensus Statement.Edward Jacobs, Brian D. Earp, Paul S. Appelbaum, Lori Bruce, Ksenia Cassidy, Yuria Celidwen, Katherine Cheung, Sean K. Clancy, Neşe Devenot, Jules Evans, Holly Fernandez Lynch, Phoebe Friesen, Albert Garcia Romeu, Neil Gehani, Molly Maloof, Olivia Marcus, Ole Martin Moen, Mayli Mertens, Sandeep M. Nayak, Tehseen Noorani, Kyle Patch, Sebastian Porsdam-Mann, Gokul Raj, Khaleel Rajwani, Keisha Ray, William Smith, Daniel Villiger, Neil Levy, Roger Crisp, Julian Savulescu, Ilina Singh & David B. Yaden - forthcoming - American Journal of Bioethics:1-7.
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  46.  84
    Vision and certitude in the age of Ockham: optics, epistemology, and the foundations of semantics, 1250-1345.Katherine H. Tachau - 1988 - New York: E.J. Brill.
  47.  11
    Time for Love.Leon S. Brenner & Katherine Everitt - 2023 - Res Pública. Revista de Historia de Las Ideas Políticas 26 (3):369-376.
    Alain Badiou offers a distinctive interpretation of time, anchored in his unique metaphysics and philosophy of the event. For Badiou, time is interventional, demarcating a disjunction between two incommensurable sequences of rupture in human history. The concept of disjunction occupies a pivotal role in Badiou’s philosophy of both love and time. This paper provides a comprehensive examination of the temporality of love within the context of Badiou's philosophy. We argue that, when viewed through Badiou’s philosophical lens, love provides an invaluable (...)
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  48.  2
    Vision and certitude in the age of Ockham: optics, epistemology, and the foundations of semantics, 1250-1345.Katherine H. Tachau - 1988 - New York: E.J. Brill.
    When William of Ockham lectured on Lombard's Sentences in 1317-1319, he articulated a new theory of knowledge. Its reception by fourteenth-century scholars was, however, largely negative, for it conflicted with technical accounts of vision and with their interprations of Duns Scotus. This study begins with Roger Bacon, a major source for later scholastics' efforts to tie a complex of semantic and optical explanations together into an account of concept formation, truth and the acquisition of certitude. After considering the challenges of (...)
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  49.  19
    An electroencephalographic examination of the autonomous sensory meridian response.Beverley Katherine Fredborg, Kevin Champagne-Jorgensen, Amy S. Desroches & Stephen D. Smith - 2021 - Consciousness and Cognition 87:103053.
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  50. The Limits of Realism.Tim Button - 2013 - Oxford: Oxford University Press UK.
    Tim Button explores the relationship between words and world; between semantics and scepticism. -/- A certain kind of philosopher – the external realist – worries that appearances might be radically deceptive. For example, she allows that we might all be brains in vats, stimulated by an infernal machine. But anyone who entertains the possibility of radical deception must also entertain a further worry: that all of our thoughts are totally contentless. That worry is just incoherent. -/- We cannot, then, (...)
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