7 found
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  1.  17
    Can a robot be an expert? The social meaning of skill and its expression through the prospect of autonomous AgTech.Katharine Legun, Karly Ann Burch & Laurens Klerkx - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 40 (2):501-517.
    Artificial intelligence and robotics have increasingly been adopted in agri-food systems—from milking robots to self-driving tractors. New projects extend these technologies in an effort to automate skilled work that has previously been considered dependent on human expertise due to its complexity. In this paper, we draw on qualitative research carried out with farm managers on apple orchards and winegrape vineyards in Aotearoa New Zealand. We investigate how agricultural managers’ perceptions of future agricultural automation relates to their approach to expertise, or (...)
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  2.  10
    Intellectual property meets transdisciplinary co-design: prioritizing responsiveness in the production of new AgTech through located response-ability.Karly Ann Burch, Dawn Nafus, Katharine Legun & Laurens Klerkx - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 40 (2):455-474.
    This paper explores the complex relationship between intellectual property (IP) and the transdisciplinary collaborative design (co-design) of new digital technologies for agriculture (AgTech). More specifically, it explores how prioritizing the capturing of IP as a central researcher responsibility can cause disruptions to research relationships and project outcomes. We argue that boundary-making processes associated with IP create a particular context through which responsibility can, and must, be located and cultivated by researchers working within transdisciplinary collaborations. We draw from interview data and (...)
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  3.  11
    Cultivating intellectual community in academia: reflections from the Science and Technology Studies Food and Agriculture Network (STSFAN).Karly Burch, Mascha Gugganig, Julie Guthman, Emily Reisman, Matt Comi, Samara Brock, Barkha Kagliwal, Susanne Freidberg, Patrick Baur, Cornelius Heimstädt, Sarah Ruth Sippel, Kelsey Speakman, Sarah Marquis, Lucía Argüelles, Charlotte Biltekoff, Garrett Broad, Kelly Bronson, Hilary Faxon, Xaq Frohlich, Ritwick Ghosh, Saul Halfon, Katharine Legun & Sarah J. Martin - 2023 - Agriculture and Human Values 40 (3):951-959.
    Scholarship flourishes in inclusive environments where open deliberations and generative feedback expand both individual and collective thinking. Many researchers, however, have limited access to such settings, and most conventional academic conferences fall short of promises to provide them. We have written this Field Report to share our methods for cultivating a vibrant intellectual community within the Science and Technology Studies Food and Agriculture Network (STSFAN). This is paired with insights from 21 network members on aspects that have allowed STSFAN to (...)
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  4.  8
    Social science – STEM collaborations in agriculture, food and beyond: an STSFAN manifesto.Karly Burch, Julie Guthman, Mascha Gugganig, Kelly Bronson, Matt Comi, Katharine Legun, Charlotte Biltekoff, Garrett Broad, Samara Brock, Susanne Freidberg, Patrick Baur & Diana Mincyte - 2023 - Agriculture and Human Values 40 (3):939-949.
    Interdisciplinary research needs innovation. As an action-oriented intervention, this Manifesto begins from the authors’ experiences as social scientists working within interdisciplinary science and technology collaborations in agriculture and food. We draw from these experiences to: 1) explain what social scientists contribute to interdisciplinary agri-food tech collaborations; (2) describe barriers to substantive and meaningful collaboration; and (3) propose ways to overcome these barriers. We encourage funding bodies to develop mechanisms that ensure funded projects respect the integrity of social science expertise and (...)
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  5.  31
    Performance versus Values in Sustainability Transformation of Food Systems.Hugo F. Alrøe, Marion Sautier, Katharine Legun, Jay Whitehead, Egon Noe, Henrik Moller & Jon Manhire - 2017 - Sustainability 9 (3):332.
    Questions have been raised on what role the knowledge provided by sustainability science actually plays in the transition to sustainability and what role it may play in the future. In this paper we investigate different approaches to sustainability transformation of food systems by analyzing the rationale behind transformative acts-the ground that the direct agents of change act upon- and how the type of rationale is connected to the role of research and how the agents of change are involved. To do (...)
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  6.  25
    Sustainability programs and deliberative processes: assembling sustainable winegrowing in New Zealand.Katharine Legun & Marion Sautier - 2018 - Agriculture and Human Values 35 (4):837-852.
    The term sustainability can be used so liberally within production industries that it becomes meaningless. There is also recognition that for sustainability to be a useful concept, it must be crafted for the context in which it is deployed. A paradox of sustainability, it seems, lies in the conflict between the practical adoptability and context specificity of programs paired with the need for significant change. One response for those grappling with this sustainability challenge has been to adopt flexible approaches to (...)
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  7.  11
    (Un)intended lock-in: Chile’s organic agriculture law and the possibility of transformation towards more sustainable food systems.Maria Contesse, Jessica Duncan, Katharine Legun & Laurens Klerkx - 2023 - Agriculture and Human Values 41 (1):167-187.
    Food systems transformations require coherent policies and improved understandings of the drivers and institutional dynamics that shape (un)sustainable food systems outcomes. In this paper, we introduce the Chilean National Organic Agriculture Law as a case of a policy process seeking to institutionalize a recognized pathway towards more sustainable food systems. Drawing from institutional theory we make visible multiple, and at times competing, logics (i.e., values, assumptions and practices) of different actors implicated in organic agriculture in Chile. More specifically, our findings (...)
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