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  1.  24
    Mobility and Navigation among the Yucatec Maya.Elizabeth Cashdan, Karen L. Kramer, Helen E. Davis, Lace Padilla & Russell D. Greaves - 2016 - Human Nature 27 (1):35-50.
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  2.  3
    Childhood Teaching and Learning among Savanna Pumé Hunter-Gatherers.Karen L. Kramer - 2021 - Human Nature 32 (1):87-114.
    Research in nonindustrial small-scale societies challenges the common perception that human childhood is universally characterized by a long period of intensive adult investment and dedicated instruction. Using return rate and time allocation data for the Savanna Pumé, a group of South American hunter-gatherers, age patterns in how children learn to become productive foragers and from whom they learn are observed across the transition from childhood to adolescence. Results show that Savanna Pumé children care for their siblings, are important economic contributors, (...)
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  3.  14
    Variation in juvenile dependence.Karen L. Kramer - 2002 - Human Nature 13 (2):299-325.
    Notable in cross-cultural comparisons is the variable span of time between when children become economically self-sufficient and when they initiate their own reproductive careers. That variation is of interest because it shapes the age range of children reliant on others for support and the age range of children available to help out, which in turn affects the competing demands on parents to support multiple dependents of different ages. The age at positive net production is used as a proxy to estimate (...)
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  4.  28
    Juvenile Subsistence Effort, Activity Levels, and Growth Patterns.Karen L. Kramer & Russell D. Greaves - 2011 - Human Nature 22 (3):303-326.
    Attention has been given to cross-cultural differences in adolescent growth, but far less is known about developmental variability during juvenility (ages 3–10). Previous research among the Pumé, a group of South American foragers, found that girls achieve a greater proportion of their adult stature during juvenility compared with normative growth expectations. To explain rapid juvenile growth, in this paper we consider girls’ activity levels and energy expended in subsistence effort. Results show that Pumé girls spend far less time in subsistence (...)
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  5.  11
    Why What Juveniles Do Matters in the Evolution of Cooperative Breeding.Karen L. Kramer - 2014 - Human Nature 25 (1):49-65.
  6.  49
    Postmarital Residence and Bilateral Kin Associations among Hunter-Gatherers.Karen L. Kramer & Russell D. Greaves - 2011 - Human Nature 22 (1-2):41-63.
    Dispersal of individuals from their natal communities at sexual maturity is an important determinant of kin association. In this paper we compare postmarital residence patterns among Pumé foragers of Venezuela to investigate the prevalence of sex-biased vs. bilateral residence. This study complements cross-cultural overviews by examining postmarital kin association in relation to individual, longitudinal data on residence within a forager society. Based on cultural norms, the Pumé have been characterized as matrilocal. Analysis of Pumé marriages over a 25-year period finds (...)
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  7. A case study in variability in juvenile dependence: The benefits of Maya children's work to parents.Karen L. Kramer - 2002 - Human Nature 13 (2):299-325.
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  8.  17
    Intergenerational transfers and the cost of allomothering in traditional societies.Karen L. Kramer - 2010 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (1):30-31.
    The question of why helpers help is debated in the cooperative breeding literature. Recent reevaluations of inclusive fitness theory have important implications for traditional populations in which the provisioning of young occurs in the context of intergenerational transfers. These transfers link older and younger generations in an economic relationship that both minimizes the demand for help and the cost of helping.
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  9.  17
    How maya women respond to changing technology.Karen L. Kramer & Garnett P. McMillan - 1998 - Human Nature 9 (2):205-223.
    In the mid 1970s labor-saving technology was introduced into a Maya subsistence agricultural community that markedly increased the efficiency with which maize could be ground and water collected. This increased efficiency introduces a possible savings in the time that women allocate to work, which can be reapportioned to child care, food production, domestic work, or leisure. An earlier study suggested that this labor-saving technology had a positive effect in decreasing the age at which these Maya women begin their reproductive careers. (...)
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