7 found
Order:
  1.  26
    Sword-Fighting in the Iliad: A Note on eλaϒnω.K. B. Saunders - 2006 - Classical Quarterly 56 (1):279-284.
  2. The Wounds inIliad13–16.K. B. Saunders - 1999 - Classical Quarterly 49 (2):345-363.
    The wounds inflicted by Homer's warriors fascinate readers, since they are vividly described and often curious or even grotesque. Commentators have struggled to explain some of them since commentaries began: some of the explanations are more curious than the wounds. Not surprisingly, the commentaries have not usually been graced by a high standard of anatomical or, especially, physiological background knowledge, and are often misleading in these respects. When such knowledge is applied, some wounds which have appeared problematic become realistic, but (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  8
    Sword-Fighting In The Iliad: A NOTE ON EΛAϒNΩ.K. B. Saunders - 2006 - Classical Quarterly 56 (1):279-284.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  15
    Sword-Fighting in the Iliad : A Note on Eλaυnω.K. B. Saunders - 2006 - Classical Quarterly 56 (01):279-.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  11
    Frölich’s Table of Homeric Wounds.K. B. Saunders - 2004 - Classical Quarterly 54 (1):1-17.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  6.  28
    The Wounds in Iliad 13–16.K. B. Saunders - 1999 - Classical Quarterly 49 (02):345-.
    The wounds inflicted by Homer's warriors fascinate readers, since they are vividly described and often curious or even grotesque. Commentators have struggled to explain some of them since commentaries began: some of the explanations are more curious than the wounds. Not surprisingly, the commentaries have not usually been graced by a high standard of anatomical or, especially, physiological background knowledge, and are often misleading in these respects. When such knowledge is applied, some wounds which have appeared problematic become realistic, but (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  7.  4
    The Wounds in Iliad 13–16.K. B. Saunders - 1999 - Classical Quarterly 49 (2):345-363.
    The wounds inflicted by Homer's warriors fascinate readers, since they are vividly described and often curious or even grotesque. Commentators have struggled to explain some of them since commentaries began: some of the explanations are more curious than the wounds. Not surprisingly, the commentaries have not usually been graced by a high standard of anatomical or, especially, physiological background knowledge, and are often misleading in these respects. When such knowledge is applied, some wounds which have appeared problematic become realistic, but (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark