13 found
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  1.  75
    What comes to mind?Adam Bear, Samantha Bensinger, Julian Jara-Ettinger, Joshua Knobe & Fiery Cushman - 2020 - Cognition 194 (C):104057.
    When solving problems, like making predictions or choices, people often “sample” possibilities into mind. Here, we consider whether there is structure to the kinds of thoughts people sample by default—that is, without an explicit goal. Across three experiments we found that what comes to mind by default are samples from a probability distribution that combines what people think is likely and what they think is good. Experiment 1 found that the first quantities that come to mind for everyday behaviors and (...)
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  2.  24
    Children’s understanding of the costs and rewards underlying rational action.Julian Jara-Ettinger, Hyowon Gweon, Joshua B. Tenenbaum & Laura E. Schulz - 2015 - Cognition 140 (C):14-23.
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  3.  26
    Flexible Goals Require that Inflexible Perceptual Systems Produce Veridical Representations: Implications for Realism as Revealed by Evolutionary Simulations.Marlene D. Berke, Robert Walter-Terrill, Julian Jara-Ettinger & Brian J. Scholl - 2022 - Cognitive Science 46 (10):e13195.
    How veridical is perception? Rather than representing objects as they actually exist in the world, might perception instead represent objects only in terms of the utility they offer to an observer? Previous work employed evolutionary modeling to show that under certain assumptions, natural selection favors such “strict‐interface” perceptual systems. This view has fueled considerable debate, but we think that discussions so far have failed to consider the implications of two critical aspects of perception. First, while existing models have explored single (...)
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  4.  20
    The social basis of referential communication: Speakers construct physical reference based on listeners’ expected visual search.Julian Jara-Ettinger & Paula Rubio-Fernandez - 2022 - Psychological Review 129 (6):1394-1413.
  5.  18
    Communication efficiency of color naming across languages provides a new framework for the evolution of color terms.Bevil R. Conway, Sivalogeswaran Ratnasingam, Julian Jara-Ettinger, Richard Futrell & Edward Gibson - 2020 - Cognition 195 (C):104086.
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  6.  9
    Identifying social partners through indirect prosociality: A computational account.Isaac Davis, Ryan Carlson, Yarrow Dunham & Julian Jara-Ettinger - 2023 - Cognition 240 (C):105580.
  7.  12
    Preschoolers decide who is knowledgeable, who to inform, and who to trust via a causal understanding of how knowledge relates to action.Rosie Aboody, Holly Huey & Julian Jara-Ettinger - 2022 - Cognition 228 (C):105212.
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  8.  40
    People's thinking plans adapt to the problem they're trying to solve.Joan Danielle K. Ongchoco, Joshua Knobe & Julian Jara-Ettinger - 2024 - Cognition 243 (C):105669.
    Much of our thinking focuses on deciding what to do in situations where the space of possible options is too large to evaluate exhaustively. Previous work has found that people do this by learning the general value of different behaviors, and prioritizing thinking about high-value options in new situations. Is this good-action bias always the best strategy, or can thinking about low-value options sometimes become more beneficial? Can people adapt their thinking accordingly based on the situation? And how do we (...)
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  9.  3
    Children's understanding of the abstract logic of counting.Colin Jacobs, Madison Flowers & Julian Jara-Ettinger - 2021 - Cognition 214 (C):104790.
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  10.  7
    When Naïve Pedagogy Breaks Down: Adults Rationally Decide How to Teach, but Misrepresent Learners’ Beliefs.Rosie Aboody, Joey Velez-Ginorio, Laurie R. Santos & Julian Jara-Ettinger - 2023 - Cognitive Science 47 (3):e13257.
    From early in childhood, humans exhibit sophisticated intuitions about how to share knowledge efficiently in simple controlled studies. Yet, untrained adults often fail to teach effectively in real‐world situations. Here, we explored what causes adults to struggle in informal pedagogical exchanges. In Experiment 1, we first showed evidence of this effect, finding that adult participants failed to communicate their knowledge to naïve learners in a simple teaching task, despite reporting high confidence that they taught effectively. Using a computational model of (...)
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  11.  8
    Not just what you did, but how: Children see distributors that count as more fair than distributors who don't.Colin Jacobs, Madison Flowers, Rosie Aboody, Maria Maier & Julian Jara-Ettinger - 2022 - Cognition 225 (C):105128.
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  12.  30
    Sensitivity to the Sampling Process Emerges From the Principle of Efficiency.Julian Jara-Ettinger, Felix Sun, Laura Schulz & Joshua B. Tenenbaum - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (S1):270-286.
    Humans can seamlessly infer other people's preferences, based on what they do. Broadly, two types of accounts have been proposed to explain different aspects of this ability. The first account focuses on spatial information: Agents' efficient navigation in space reveals what they like. The second account focuses on statistical information: Uncommon choices reveal stronger preferences. Together, these two lines of research suggest that we have two distinct capacities for inferring preferences. Here we propose that this is not the case, and (...)
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  13.  2
    People can use the placement of objects to infer communicative goals.Michael Lopez-Brau & Julian Jara-Ettinger - 2023 - Cognition 239 (C):105524.
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